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TOWN OF WILMINGTON 




ANNUAL REPORT 




for the year 1995 



INMEMORIAM 



LOUIS A. ABATE 
THOMAS G. BUCKLE 
THOMAS E. CASEY 
MARY L. DUCEY 
ELIZABETH R. FOSGATE 

C. NICKI JOHNSON 
CATHERINE P. LINDMARK 
ANN WASHBURN MELANSON 
ESTHER H. NICHOLS 
CARL A. OLSSON 



(front cover) 



On November 19, 1995, residents of the Town of Wilmington, once again proved that 
a community is a reflection of the hearts of the people who live in it. Approximately 
200 runners took part in a 5K road race and hundreds of others volunteered their 
services by conducting a myriad of fimd-raising activities to benefit one of their own. 
Wilmington thanks its employees, residents and citizens of other communities who 
rallied in support of Joe, a fine student athlete who suffered a serious spinal injury 
over the summer. 



'Joe Bamberg Day ' 




Title 



Page 



Accepted Streets 42 

ADA Advisory Committe 72 

Animal Control Officer 31 

Board of Appeals 73 

Board of Assessors 19 

Board of Health 49 

Board of Registrars 22 

Board of Selectmen 2 

Boards, Committees & Commissions 10 

Cable TV Advisory Task Force 48 

Carter Lecture Fund 60 

Constable 



22 
85 
89 
9 



Council for the Arts 

Department of Public Works 

Directory of Officials 

Disabilities, Commission on 71 

Elderly Services Commission 69 

Fire Department 23 

Historical Commission 59 

Housing Authority 53 

Housing Partnership 41 

Inspector of Buildings 32 

Library 66 

Meeting Dates and Times 177 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 87 

Middlesex Canal Commission 48 

Mission Statement 1 

Municipal Services Guide 14 

Officers & Department Heads 13 

Permanent Building Committee 22 

Planning/Conservation Department 33 

Police Department 27 

Public Buildings Department 60 

Recreation Commission 61 

Recycling Advisory Committee 88 

Redevelopment Authority 48 

Sealer of Weights and Measurers 72 

School Department 95 

Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational High School 110 

Telephone Directory by Department 178 

Town Accountant 153 

Town Clerk 20 

Town Collector/Treasurer 18 

Town Counsel 55 

Town Manager 5 

Town Meetings. . . . Annual Town Election - April 15, 1995 114 

Annual Town Meeting - April 22, 1995 115 

Special Town Meeting - December 4, 1995 145 

Veterans' Services 65 

Water & Sewer Department 92 




The "Mission Statement for the Town of Wilmington" is as follows: 

"The Town of Wilmington, as a municipal corporation, exists in 
order to deliver a wide range of municipal services to those who 
live, work or own property within the borders of Wilmington; and 
in order to make this community a good place to live, to work, and 
to raise and educate a family, those services must be responsive 
to the needs of the people. They must be effective and efficient. 
Principles of honesty, fairness, dependability and compassion must 
govern the actions of the officials and the employees of the Town. 
Those who work for the Town as employees or as members of boards, 
committees and commissions are recognized as its most important 
resource and the key to its success in serving the people of 
Wilmington. " 

Endorsed by the Board of Selectmen May 22, 1989. 



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9mc fSOS'J Ssd'-SSS^ 



During the past year the Board of Selectmen addressed many issues which affect 
the quality of life of our residents. 

The Boutwell School was reopened because of the increasing growth in the 
number of school age children. The reopening was accomplished without an 
override. The town's employees worked hard over the summer to get the 
facility ready for the Kindergarten children who would be using this facility. 
Recognizing the need to address future space needs, the town appropriated 
$40,000 at the Annual Town Meeting to undertake a study to address the issue. 



The long awaited construction of the new Burlington Avenue bridge was accepted 
by the Massachusetts Highway Department and scheduled for a spring 1996 bid 
opening. The construction sequencing will now allow traffic to proceed in 
both directions during the life of the project. Earlier plans called for all 
traffic to be rerouted through town, which would have been a major 
inconvenience for residents and public safety officials. The new bridge will 
have two lanes of traffic in each direction with major improvements to the 
intersection with new traffic signals, sidewalk improvements and landscaping. 



The Redevelopment Authority continued its plans for the reconstruction of the 
Route 38 corridor and received unanimous support from the Board of Selectmen 
to proceed with the final design to submit plans to the state for approval. 

The town began negotiations with the MBTA for a new rail station and parking 
facility in Wilmington Center. Conceptual plans were submitted which detailed 
a new platform and parking lot with handicap access. 



Economic development received a lot of attention with the formation of the 
Economic Development Commission (EDC) , whose goal is to increase our tax base 
and provide more jobs. The EDC, which consists of 15 members including 
representatives from town boards and local businesses, is currently in the 
process of preparing an inventory of the town' s resources. In August the town 
applied for a Ready Resource Grant sponsored by Massachusetts EOCD for small 
business loans and job training monies. After an initial meeting with EOCD, 
the town was invited to submit a grant application outlining its goals for the 
grant. The Planning Director, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, 
submitted the grant and the town was formally notified in November that it was 
the recipient of a $400,000 Grant. 



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Several committees became active during the year. The Cable TV Advisory 
Committee held two public hearings for input relative to the new contract 
which will become effective in 1997. Also active during the year was the 
Committee on Unaccepted Streets, which held several meetings to determine how 
the town can address this long standing problem. The town, through its 
Chairman and Town Manager were asked by the Town of North Reading to 
participate in a joint committee to study the re-use of the former John T. 
Berry Rehabilitation Center. The objective of the Committee is to formulate 
plans for another use of the closed facility, other than a prison. 

The Town Moderator met with the Board of Selectmen to discuss avenues to 
improve attendance at the Annual Town Meeting. It was decided to have the By- 
Law Study Committee look at various options including different times and 
dates for increasing participation. A report will be made to the Board in 
1996. 

The Board of Selectmen and the Planning Board met and agreed to form a 
committee to update the town's 25-year old Master Plan, which will be used as 
a tool for guiding us into the next century. The Boards agreed to advertise 
to recruit town residents who would like to participate in this study. The 
Committee will be appointed and begin work in 1996. 

To improve communications between town hall and the residents, a community 
newsletter was implemented. It provides the town with the opportunity to 
inform the residents on a regular basis about on-going issues and allows a 
forum for questions and answers about town government. The newsletter is 
mailed out with the tax bills on a quarterly basis. 

In the fall of 1995, the new 911 Emergency Response System was implemented in 
Wilmington. This system will help public safety in the community. It was 
implemented through the efforts of Police and Fire personnel. 

The Board worked with a neighborhood group and state legislators to ban train 
whistles at gated crossings. This improved the quality of life of residents 
living near these crossings. In addition, the town obtained funds for the 
installation of gates at the Kilmarnock Street railroad crossing and is 
currently pursuing additional funding for other ungated crossings throughout 
the town. 

At the 1995 Annual Town Meeting voters appropriated $5,000 to implement the 
Senior Citizen Tax Work-Off Program which allows seniors, who own property, to 
participate in a 100 hour part-time work program for the town. They can earn 
$500 to be used for their real estate taxes. This program will allow for ten 
seniors to participate. The town established a criteria of eligibility and 
received several responses from people wishing to participate. Because of the 
favorable response, the town will sponsor this prograun next year. 

The Board of Selectmen has denied the recommendation of the Reading Municipal 
Light Department (RMLD) to serve as its collection agent for Wilmington 
residents who are delinquent in the payment of their electric bills. This 
issue remains unresolved. 

The Board also recognized two significant milestones with two proclcunations . 
The 75th Anniversary of the League of Women Voters and 50th Anniversary of the 
Community Fund. The Board takes great pride in both of these organizations. 



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The Board would like to thank the many residents who donate their time and 
skills to serve on town boards and commissions. The Board also expresses its 
appreciation to our town employees and the Town Manager for their continued 
hard work and dedication. The efforts of all these people have made our town 
better place to live and raise a faultily. 



Diane M. Allan 
Chairman 




Left to right: Selectman Robert J. Cain, Selectman James J. Rooney, Chairman Diane M. Allan, Selectman Michael 
V. McCoy and Selectman Daniel C. Wandell. 



Town OP Wilmington 

121 GLEN ROAD 
WILMINGTON. MA 01887 

OFFICE OF THE '^^'^ 658-3334 

TOWN MANAGER 694-1417 
(508) 658 3311 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Wilmington, 

The challenge that confronts nearly every municipality including the Town of 
Wilmington, is how to best allocate limited resources aunong competing needs. 
In the calendar year 1995, town government was well-prepared to face this 
fundamental challenge. Several years of conservative financial management 
enabled the town to maximize its resources while expanding it's programs and 
services. The agenda for 1995 was cimbitious. In addition to the expansion of 
current services, the town established new programs, updated its capital 
equipment, maintained and improved its infrastructure and most importantly 
reopened the Boutwell School. 

An examination of town government operations during 1995 can best be 
accomplished by a review of the town's financial condition. In the late 
1980 's the town found itself in financial difficulties with problems of 
negative free cash, yearly operating deficits and hidden liabilities. For 
example, the town faced significant Appellate Tax Board cases to the extent 
that the town's liability exceeded its reserve for abatements by approximately 
$3 million. The town also faced the continuing problem of revenue sources 
being unable to sustain the town's operating budget. Over the past several 
years however, town government has managed to control the growth of its 
spending, thus enabling departments to meet the demands inherent to our 
growing population. As we begin the year 1996, the town's financial condition 
continues to improve. A positive free cash position is anticipated by the end 
of fiscal year 1996, despite the necessity of having to resolve years of 
outstanding tax liabilities. The town has not borrowed in anticipation of tax 
revenue for more than one year and anticipates no short term borrowing in the 
immediate future. The outstanding fixed debt is $3.5 million as compared to 
nearly $23 million in 1988. In addition, all existing debt will be paid by 
the year 2001. 

The town has also made giant strides in improving its financial reserve 
position. The town's operational reserve is more than twice the previous 
year's. The town has built reserves for future water and sewer projects, 
while stabilizing water rates and reducing sewer rates for the third year in a 
row. The town has $250,000 in its capital stabilization account, funds that 
can be used to meet long range facility improvements for public safety and 
school buildings. Sufficient reserves have been established for abatements 
greatly reducing outstanding Appellate Tax Board case liability. Moreover, 
the town has reserves in several special revenue and trust accounts which are 
not reflected by free cash but will offer savings to the taxpayer and the 
ratepayer as Wilmington prepares to embark on future important capital 
projects . 

Customer satisfaction is the mainstay of any successful business. Management 
guru, Peter Drucker, defines the quality in a service or product as "not what 
you put into it," but "what the client or customer gets out of it." The 
measure of citizen satisfaction is paramount to determining the value of 
government services. In 1995 several new initiatives were launched and 



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departments embarked on an effort to maximize what residents "get out of 
government." In an effort to improve communications with townspeople, the 
Board of Selectmen authorized the establishment of a municipal newsletter 
which is published quarterly by the Town Manager's office and distributed with 
the real estate tax mailings. The newsletter is designed to inform residents 
and business owners of local government activity. Town meeting members 
established a Senior Citizen Property Tax Work-Off Program. The program is 
designed to enable senior citizens, who are residential property owners, an 
opportunity to reduce their property taxes by working part-time for the town. 
Town meeting members also authorized the establishment of a Town of Wilmington 
Scholarship Program. Voluntary donations to this fund will assist worthy and 
deserving Wilmington residents to further their post-secondary school or 
college education. A committee has been established to organize and oversee 
the progrcun. 

The Police Department completed its first full year of implementation of the 
Community Police Program which saw the deployment of neighborhood police 
officers, the installation of bicycle patrols and the establishment of a 
citizens police academy. Enhanced 911, described as the most advanced and 
technically sophisticated emergency call system in the country, became 
operational in Wilmington this past October. Public Buildings personnel 
renovated the Police Department in order to accommodate this important public 
safety initiative. All fire fighters received advanced life safety training 
for EPI PEN and defibrillator certification. A children's health program was 
established by the Board of Health with Wilmington Pediatrics to provide free 
pediatric examinations to uninsured Wilmington youngsters. 

The Public Library was equipped with an electronic reading machine to assist 
the visually or reading impaired. Significant improvements were made to town 
property in order to meet the needs of the disabled. Rest rooms and water 
fountains were made handicapped accessible at the Town Hall, the West 
Intermediate School and the Library. Additionally, a handicapped accessible 
water fountain was installed at the town's common. These are cunong a few of 
the many activities that were launched in 1995 in an attempt to meet the 
diverse needs of the citizenry. 

The town continues to address it major infrastructure and capital equipment 
needs. Town meeting members authorized the purchase of five police cruisers, 
maintenance vehicles for the Department of Public Works and the Public 
Buildings Department as well as a new mini-van for the School Department. 
Important safety equipment was upgraded at the Fire Department including the 
purchase of a new Jaws of Life. Building renovations were made to the Town 
Treasurer's office and to the Department of Public Works offices. A major 
portion of the Library's roof was replaced. A diesel exhaust system was 
installed at the Fire Department and a new oil burner was installed at the 
West Intermediate School. A record number of residents took advantage of the 
town's household hazardous waste collection day ensuring the proper disposal 
of such waste and lessening the likelihood of conteunination to the 
environment. 

The Department of Public Works managed several major construction projects in 
the town during 1995. Perhaps the most significant was the construction of 
new sidewalks on Nichols Street extending from Fairmeadow Road to the 
Tewksbury line on the east side and on the west side from Fairmeadow Road to 
Flagstaff Road. These sidewalks have enabled the School Department to save 
considerable dollars in transportation costs and have provided all residents 
with a safe environment in which to walk. Department of Public Works' crews 
also reconstructed the intersection of North Street and Longview Road, thus 
improving traffic safety and traffic flow in a very busy neighborhood. Safety 
improvements to the Wildwood and Boutwell School parking and playground areas 
were made in time for the new school year. Traffic improvement projects which 
included the installation of new signals were completed at the intersection of 
Woburn and Concord Streets and the intersection of Route 125 and Ballardvale 
Street . 

At town meetings in April and December, voters provided the School Department 
with one and one-quarter million dollars more than its previous year's 
budgetary allotment. As a result, the Boutwell School reopened, staffing 
improved, collective bargaining agreements were honored without lay-offs and 



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the beginning phases of an improved professional development program emerged. 
The effort undertaken by the town to ready the Boutwell School for several 
hundred kindergarten and pre-kindergarten students, was nothing less than 
monumental. The total refurbishment of the school was accomplished during the 
summer under the auspices of the Public Building's Department with volunteer 
painting assistance from the inmates at the Billerica House of Correction. 

Government activity during 1995 was not just confined to meeting present 
needs. In fact, a number of initiatives are underway to meet the important 
future needs of the community. Town meeting voters authorized the expenditure 
of $40,000 from the capital stabilization fund for the purpose of conducting a 
comprehensive facilities study to assess the future building needs of the 
town, particularly as they relate to school and public safety. A feasibility 
study was completed to review the town's options for treating water from the 
Shawsheen Avenue wellfield. In addition, a townwide hydraulic analysis has 
been undertaken to develop a master plan for the water system which will 
ultimately recommend improvements to rectify problem areas in the town's water 
system. The town is also aggressively working to reduce the inflow and 
infiltration of groundwater into the sewer system in order to reduce 
unnecessary flows and thereby reduce the town's ^^WRA assessment. The Trustees 
of the Memorial Library established a Long Range Planning Committee which 
prepared and presented a five year plan that is now on file with the 
Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners and is designed to be a blueprint 
to meet the future needs associated with town library services. Finally, in 
recognition of the town's need to upgrade all of its streets, the Unaccepted 
Ways Committee continues to study methods in which to provide for future 
acceptance of substandard roadways. 

At year's end, the town received notification that it had been awarded a 
$400,000 Ready Resource Fund Grant from the Executive Office of Communities 
and Development. This grant, which will be administered by the Director of 
Planning and Conservation, will re-establish the employment assistance program 
that was initially funded through a Small Cities Grant and will establish a 
Revolving Small Business Loan Program for Wilmington businesses. Grants were 
also received by the Board of Health to continue its effective smoking 
cessation progrcun and by the Department of Elderly Services to maintain its 
respite care and outreach activities. 

The Town of Wilmington continues to attract businesses to the community. The 
town's focus on economic development is evidenced by its low industrial 
vacancy rate which currently hovers under 5%. At year's end, plans were 
unveiled to develop two major office parks. One company, PGA Realty Trust, 
has begun the development of Upton Technology Park, a 37 acre master planned 
corporate campus featuring three buildings totalling over 250,000 square feet. 
In August of 1995, town officials attended the dedication ceremony for the Ray 
Stata Technology Center on the site of Analog Devices. The two story, 108,000 
square foot building will serve as a state-of-the-art research and development 
center for product and technology development and clearly provides a major 
boost to the Wilmington economy. By the time this annual report is published, 
Osco Drug will have welcomed Wilmington officials to a ribbon cutting 
ceremony. These are just a few of the exaunples that highlight Wilmington's 
vitality in the area of commercial and business activity. 

Many wonderful acts of caring take place in Wilmington that truly capture the 
essence of our community. In 1995 there were three such activities which, in 
my judgment, best exemplify Wilmington and its people. In September, hundreds 
of volunteers came together for the second annual Wilmington Watershed Clean- 
up Day. Volunteers cleaned culverts and removed debris from areas throughout 
the town including Silver Lake, Rotary Park Pond and Glen Road. In October, 
Wilmington's spirit of generosity and its commitment to youth were clearly in 
evidence when the High School Gymnasium came alive to the sound of music. The 
British/American project, conceived and nurtured to success by music teacher 
Ward Dilmore, showcased the talents of youthful musicians and singers from 
Wilmington and from Holmfirth and West Yorkshire, England. The third such 
outpouring of good will, affection and generosity occurred in November and 
best captured the essence of Wilmington. There could have been no better 
demonstration of town spirit and camaraderie than the community's response to 
"Joe Bamberg" Day in the Town of Wilmington. Declared as such by the Board of 
Selectmen, townspeople rallied in support of a local student athlete who 

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suffered a serious spinal injury over the summer. Congratulations to the 
"Friends of Joe" committee, to the volunteers of the Wilmington Watershed 
Clean-up effort and to the parents and friends of Wilmington's aspiring 
musicians. All of these individuals and many others who comprise Wilmington's 
core group of caregivers and community leaders deserve a special thank-you for 
making Wilmington what it is. 

The Town of Wilmington can be proud of its many outstanding employees several 
of whom were honored this past year. Assistant Town Manager Jeff Hull was 
chosen by the Governor's selection committee as one of the 1995 award 
recipients of the Eugene H. Rooney, Jr., public service award. Inspector 
Michael Celata of the Wilmington Police Department received the law 
enforcement service award from the Massachusetts Association of Italian- 
American Police Officers. Lieutenant Detective Robert Spencer, a twenty-three 
year member of the Wilmington Police Department, received the 22nd Annual 
Roland Kinlock Award from the Massachusetts Juvenile Police Officers 
Association. Edward Downs of the Public Works Department was recognized as 
one of the top eight groundskeepers in the country by the National High School 
Baseball Coaches Association for the remarkable work he accomplishes on 
Wilmington's nationally recognized high school baseball field. DPW 
Superintendent Robert Palmer was nauned Wilmington's Recycler of the Year by 
the State's Executive Office of Environmental Affairs and Public Health 
Director Greg Erickson received the Massachusetts Health Officers Association 
President's Award for leadership in the area of Title V administration. The 
town is proud of all of its employees who labor everyday to make Wilmington a 
better place in which to live. 

Municipal government experienced several changes to its roster of employees 
and community officials. Daniel Paret replaced James Russo as the town's 
Building Inspector. Five employees, with nearly 140 years of service among 
them, retired in 1995. They included: Adult Services Librarian David Rush; 
Police Sergeant Joseph Duffy; Police Officer Arthur Lynch; Fire Fighter Donald 
Ahern and Jimmy Downs a forty-two year veteran of the Wilmington Public 
Buildings Department who retired as the high school's Head Custodian. Finance 
Committee member Anthony Capuano and Conservation Commission members John 
White and Gary Mercer also stepped down from their important positions. In 
addition, Lillian Brown retired from her long-time affiliation with the 
Elderly Services Commission, Larry Flaherty left after many years of service 
as a Library Trustee and Paul Bova stepped down as a member of the Wilmington 
Recreation Commission. 

William Jennings Bryan said, "Destiny is not a matter of chance, it is a 
matter of choice. It is not a thing to be waited for, it is a thing to be 
achieved." I believe Wilmington has made the right choices over the past 
several years. Thanks to the efforts of so many Wilmington residents, our 
community is well positioned to meet the important challenges that lie ahead 
and to achieve a quality of life that all of our feunilies deserve. 




Town Manager Michael A. Cairo. 



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DIRECTORY OF OFFICIALS - January 1, 1996 



Board of Selectmen 



Diane M. Allan, Chairman 
Michael V. McCoy 
Robert J. Cain 
James J. Rooney 
Daniel C. Wandell 



1996 
1996 
1997 
1998 
1998 



Town Manager 



Michael A. Caira 



Moderator 



James C. Stewart 



1997 



School Committee 



Robert E. Surran, Chairman 
Robert W. Young, Vice Chairman 
Judson W. Miller, Secretary 
James A. Demos 
Madeleine A. Leger 
Bradford L. Jackson 
Paul R. Palizzolo 



1997 
1996 
1998 
1996 
1997 
1998 
1998 



Superintendent of Schools 



Geraldine A. O'Donnell 



Finance Committee 



George W. Hooper, Chairman 

John F. Doherty III, Vice Chairman 

Steven W. Leet, Secretary 

Richard D. Duggan 

Barry J. Mulholland 

Robert D. Ennis 

William A. Cole 

John M. Walsh 

Ann Yurek 



1997 
1996 
1997 
1996 
1996 
1997 
1998 
1998 
1998 



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Boards. Conunittees & Cotntnieeione 1995 



Term 
Expires 



Appeals. Board of 

Charles E. Boyle, Chairman 1996 

Louis J. Farkas, Jr. 1997 

Philip A. Fenton, Sr. 1998 

Anita H. Backman, Assoc. 1996 

John R. Forrest, Assoc. 1996 

Ralph E. Block, Assoc. 1996 



Assessors. Board of 

Humphrey J. Moynihan, Principal 

Roger J. Lessard 

Cable TV Advisory Task Force 

Charles N. Gilbert, Chairman 

Michael P. Niestepski, V. Chmn. 

Jeffrey M. Hull, Secretary 

Joseph Castronovo 

Ruth Kennedy 

Henry C. Latta 

Anne K. Marshall 

Judson W. Miller 

Edward J. Riopelle 

John J. Sullivan 

Peter M. Rock 

Sandra P. Curt in 

Diane M. Allan (Selectmen Liaison) 



Carter Lecture Fund Committee 

H. Elizabeth White, Chairman 1998 

Ann H. Berghaus, Rec. Sec. 1997 

Andrea B. Houser, Corr. Sec. 1996 

Dorothy V. Lafionatis, Treas. 1997 

Adele C. Passmore 1998 

Cemetery Commission 

William F. Cavanaugh, Jr., Chmn. 1997 

Willis C. Lyford 1996 

Bernard P. McMahon 1998 

Conservation Commission 

Lynne S. Guzinski, Chairman 1996 

James H. Morris, V. Chmn. 1998 

William F. C. Gately 1996 

M. Barbara Sullivan 1997 

Gail L. Mahar 1997 

Richard J. Patterson 1998 

Judith A. Waterhouse 1998 

Disabilities. Commission On 

Frank A. Botte, Chairman 1998 

Richard Gage 1996 

Phyllis P. Genetti 1996 

Laurence W. Curtis 1997 

Charlotte A. Guthrie 1997 

Joseph Franceschi, Jr. 1998 



James J. Rooney (Selectmen Liaison) 



Term 
Expires 



Economic Development Commission 

Kenneth Mastrullo, Chairman 

Michael V. McCoy 

Diane M. Allan 

Robert J. Cain 

James J. Rooney 

Daniel C. Wandell 

Michael A. Caira 

Patricia F. Duggan 

Lynn G. Duncan 

Albert G. Fiorenza, Sr. 

Raymond G. Forest 

David J. Gagnon 

Richard A. Longo 

John A. Lucci, Sr. 

Humphrey J. Moynihan 



Elderly Services Commission 

Henry C. Latta, Chairman 1998 

Joseph C. Filipowicz, V. Chmn. 1998 

Evelyn T. Kaminski 1997 

Rocco V. DePasquale 1996 

Marilyn K. McCarthy 1996 

Grace Kirkland 1997 

Thomas J. Barrasso 1998 



Hazardous Waste Committee 
Gregory P. Erickson, Coordinator 
Walter J. Sowyrda, Dep. Fire Chief 
Milton E. Calder, Sr., Board of Health 
Bobby N. Stewart, Police Chief 
Daniel R. Stewart, Fire Chief 



Health. Board of 

James A. Ficociello, Chairman 1998 

Joseph A. Paglia 1996 

Milton E. Calder, Sr. 1997 

Historical Commission 

Carolyn R. Harris, Chairman 1996 
Dorothy V. Lafionatis, Treasurer 1998 

Jean M. Rowe 1996 

Jaunes T. Murray 1996 

Frank J. West 1997 

Housing Authority 

Charles R. Fiore, Jr., Chmn. 1998 

Melvin F. Keough, V. Chmn. 1996 

Alfred N. Meegan, Jr., Sec. 1997 

Dorothy A. Butler, Treas. 1998 



Lillian C. C. Hupper, State Appointee 
(Resigned September 1995) 



-10- 



Boards, Committees & CommisBions 1995 



Term 
Expires 

Housing Partnership 

Mark T. Haldane, Chairman 1997 

Raymond G. Forest, V. Chmn. 1997 

Charles E. Boyle 1997 

Michael A. Caira 1997 

Rocco V. DePasquale 1997 

Gregory P. Erickson 1997 

James A. Ficociello 1997 

Carole S. Hamilton 1997 

Alfred N. Meegan, Jr. 1997 

Daniel W. Paret 1997 

Rev. Herbert Taylor 1997 

Daniel C. Wandell 1997 

Lester E. White 1997 
Lynn Goonin Duncan, Director 

Library Trustees 

Martha K. Stevenson, Chmn. 1998 

Anne Buzzell, V. Chmn. 1996 

James F. Banda 1996 

Patricia F. Duggan 1997 

Kenneth J. Miller 1997 

Mary Deislinger 1998 

Permanent Building Committee 

Roger J. Lessard, Chairman 1996 

Mark T. Haldane 1996 

Paul J. Melaragni 1997 

Randi R. Holland 1998 

Planning Board 

Richard A. Longo, Chairman 2000 

Carole S. Hamilton, Clerk 1997 

James L. Diorio 1996 

Austin L. Rounds 1998 

Michael A. Roache 1999 

Recreation Commission 

William Savosik, Chairman 1997 

James J. Buckley, V. Chmn. 1997 

C. Michael Burns, Sec. 1996 

Larry G. Noel 1998 

Jay Tighe 1998 

Recycling Advisory Committee 

Jeffrey M. Hull, Chairman 

Kevin Brander 

Elizabeth D. Harriman 

Anne C. Leary 

Thomas A. Ollila 

Joseph A. Paglia 

Robert P. Palmer 

Rev. Judy Thomson 

Edward P. Tripp, III 



Term 
Expires 

Redevelopment Authority 
Dennis J. Volpe, Chairman 1998 
Charles N. Gilbert, V. Chrmn. 1996 
John H. Creeth, Secretary 1998 
Patricia F. Duggan*, Treasurer 1998 
Leo W. Campbell, Asst. Treas. 1997 
Michael N. Matt, Consultant 
* State Appointment 

Regional Vocational Technical School 
Committee 

Jeunes M. Gillis 1997 
Robert G. Peterson 1998 



Registrars, Board of 

Audrey E. Riddle, Chairman 

Edward L. Sousa 

Barbara J. Buck 

Kathleen M. Scanlon, Clerk 

Town Forest Committee 
Robert P. Palmer, Chairman 
Forrest G. Downs 

Trustees of Trust Funds 
Michael Morris 
Joseph R. Peters 
Lorraine Dineen 

Unaccepted Ways. Committee On 

Michael A. Roache, Chairman 

Lynn Duncan, Secretary 

Diane M. Allan 

Silverius Blonigen 

Robert J. Cain 

Richard Capone 

Cheryl A. Dunn 

Harold Gillsun 

Randi R. Holland 

William G. Hooper 

Walter J. Kaminski 

Andrew Kuchinsky 

Robert P. Palmer 

Vincent Scifo 

Martha K. Stevenson 

Water and Sewer Commissioners 
Noel D. Baratta, Sr., Chairman 
Edwin P. Tripp, III 
Neil E. Waisnor 



1997 
1996 
1998 



1997 
1996 



1996 
1997 
1998 



-11- 



Boards, Committees & Commissions 1995 



Term Term 
Expires Expires 



Wilmington Arts Council 

David J. Maison, Chairman 1997 

H. Elizabeth White, V. Chmn. 1997 

Jane Crane, Rcdg. Sec. 1997 

Frances Keough, Corr. Sec. 1997 

Anne Buzzell, Treasurer 1996 

Edith M. Michelson 1996 

Marguerite Elia 1996 

Bruce E. Jope 1996 

Annette Campbell 1997 

Carmelo J. Corsaro 1996 

Francis T. Toohey 1996 

A. Terry Vincent 1996 

Renee M. Assetta 1996 

Augustine E. Rice 1996 

Hinda Paquette 1997 



Wilmington Election Officers 

Precinct 1 Annually 
Mary D'Eon, Warden 
Helen F. Sears, Dep. Warden 
Sandra S. Volpe, Clerk 
Phyllis M. Flaherty, Dep. Clk. 
Clarice J. Ross, Insp. 
Edith Ann Graham, Dep. Insp. 



Precinct 2 

Andrea Houser, Warden 
Jeanne Buck, Dep. Warden 
Henrietta I. Bonnell, Clerk 
Helen DelTorto, Dep. Clerk 
Eleanor Doyle, Inspector 
Patricia Cagnina, Inspector 
Shirley Pumfrey, Dep. Insp 
Elizabeth Grise, Dep. Insp. 



Precinct 3 Annually 

Marion E. Woods, Warden 

Loretta R. Caira, Dep. Warden 

Ruth J. Bedell, Clerk 

Norinne M. Markey, Insp. 

Minnie Kirby, Inspector " 

Beverly Vokey, Inspector " 

Precinct 4 

Sarah H. Cosman, Warden " 

Joan Sear f OSS, Dep. Warden " 

Elizabeth Coville, Dep. Clerk " 

Mary J. Johnson, Inspector " 

Anita Backman, Dep. Insp. ** 



Precinct 5 

Marlene Moran, Warden 
Margaret Blonigen, Dep. Warden 
Judith A. Simmons, Dep. Clerk 
Sandra Curtin, Inspector 
Mary Husen, Dep. Inspector 
Jeanne LeFavour, Dep. Insp. 
Joan Goulet, Deputy Insp. 
Melissa Nobile, Dep. Insp. 



Precinct 6 

Nancy Tarricone, Warden 
Evelyn W. Conlin, Dep. Warden 
Louise M. Wallent, Dep. Clerk 
Jean Draper, Inspector 
Irene F. Reese, Inspector 
Marion C. Murphy, Dep. Insp. 




Residents casting votes during the Town Election held April 15, 1995. 



-12- 



OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS - JANUARY 1. 1996 



Accountant 

Administrative Assistant 
Animal Control/Inspector 
Assistant Town Manager 
Assessor, Principal 
Constable 

Elderly Services Director 
Emergency Management Director 
Finance Director 
Fire Chief 

Housing Authority Exec. Director 

Inspector of Buildings 

Ipswich River Watershed Commission 

Librarian 

Mass. Bay Transportation 
Authority Advisory Board 

Mass. Water Resource Authority 
Advisory Board Rep. 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 

Middlesex County Advisory Board 

Northeast Solid Waste Committee 

Planning/Conservation Director 

Plumbing and Gas Inspector 

Police Chief 

Public Buildings Superintendent 

Public Health Director 

Public Health Nurse 

Public Works Superintendent 

Reading Municipal Light Department 
Advisory Board 

Recreation Director 

Redevelopment Authority, Consultant 
Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Town Clerk 
Town Counsel 
Town Engineer 
Town Manager 

Veterans' Agent /Grave Officer 
Water & Sewer Superintendent 
Wiring Inspector 



Michael Morris 694-2029 

Margaret A. Tarantino 658-3311 

Ellen G. Davis 658-7845 

Jeffrey M. Hull 658-3311 
Humphrey J. (Skip) Moynihan 658-3675 

Charles L. Ellsworth 658-3078 

Edith L. Cunningheun 657-7595 

Daniel R. Stewart 658-3346 

Joseph R. Peters 658-3531 

Daniel R. Stewart 658-3346 

Kenneth G. Dorrance 658-8531 

Daniel W. Paret 658-4531 

Herbert D. Nickerson 658-4207 

Sarah L. Rueter 658-2967 

Michael V. McCoy 658-3311 

Michael J. Woods 658- 

Lynn G. Duncan 658- 

Robert J. Cain 658- 

Michael A. Caira 658- 

Lynn G. Duncan 658- 

William R. Harrison 658- 

Bobby N. Stewart 658- 

Roger J. Lessard 658- 

Gregory P. Erickson 658- 

Ann V. Fitzgerald, R.N. 694- 

Robert P. Palmer 658- 

Roger J. Lessard 658- 

Kenneth Mastrullo 658- 



Ronald N. Swasey 658- 

Michael N. Matt 657- 
James J. Babineau (617) 665- 

Kathleen M. Scanlon 658- 

Alan Altman 658- 

Harold R. Gillam 658- 

Michael A. Caira 658- 

Paul A. Farrell 694- 

Michael J. Woods 658- 

Arthur T. Kelley 658- 



•4711 

■8238 

■4772 

■3311 

•8238 

•3223 

•5071 

•3017 

■4298 

•2041 

•4481 

•3017 
■5600 

■4270 

■5649 

8301 

■2030 

-3388 

■4499 

•3311 

•2040 

•4711 

•4531 



-13- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON MUNICIPAL SERVICES GUIDE 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 

Board of Selectmen (Meeting dates - 2nd & 4th Monday evening 7:00 p.m.) 

The Board of Selectmen is recognized by the General Laws of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts as the Town's chief elected officials. The Board is 
responsible for appointing the Town Manager, the Board of Appeals, the Town 
Counsel and the Town Accountant. The Selectmen are also responsible for 
issuing numerous licenses including alcohol licenses, common victualer 
licenses and licenses to operate automobile dealerships. The Selectmen serve 
on a part-time basis. 

Phone 658-3311 

Diane M. Allan, Chairman 
Robert J. Cain 
Michael V. McCoy 
Jeunes J. Rooney 
Daniel C. Wandell 



Town Manager - Michael A. Caira - 658-3311 

The Town Manager is the Chief Administrative Officer of the Town. He 
supervises and directs the administration of all departments, boards and 
commissions except for the Board of Selectmen, Town Moderator, Finance 
Committee, Schools, Board of Appeals, Election Officers and Registrars of 
Voters. His duties include the appointment and removal, if necessary, of 
staff and members of certain boards and commissions; attendance at all 
regularly scheduled meetings of the Board of Selectmen to advise and recommend 
specific courses of action regarding issues affecting the Town; representing 
the Town in all litigation to which the Town is a party; acting as the Chief 
Fiscal Officer of the Town; preparation and administration of a comprehensive 
annual budget and directing the procurement of all goods and services on 
behalf of the Town. 



Assistant Town Manager - Jeffrey M. Hull - 658-3311 

The Assistant Town Manager is responsible for the Town's health, workman's 
compensation, general liability, property, automobile, etc. insurances; 
developing the Town's recycling program and insuring that the Town meets the 
procurement regulations established by the State. The Assistant Town Manager 
serves as staff director to the Cable TV Advisory Task Force; assists with 
the preparation of the annual budget and provides general assistance to the 
Town Manager in other areas of municipal administration. 



Town Clerk - Kathleen M. Scanlon - 658-2030 

State law assigns duties to the Town Clerk in three major areas, the keeping 
of records and documents, the issuance of licenses, and the administration of 
elections. In terms of the Town records the Clerk records proceedings of all 
town meetings and elections. The Town Clerk is Registrar of all vital 
statistics and Filing Officer for birth and death certificates, zoning 
decisions, etc. The Clerk's office also issues marriage licenses, fish and 
game licenses, dog licenses, etc. The Clerk acts as supervisor of all 
elections and serves as clerk of the Board of Registrars. 



-14- 




FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION 

Town Accountant - Michael Morris - 658-2029 

The Accounting Department reviews all requests for payment which involve Town 
funds. The department prepares warrants on a weekly basis for payment of all 
bills owed by the Town. The Accountant maintains the complete official 
financial records of the Town and prepares other financial records and reports 
as needed. Additionally, this office participates in the preparation of the 
annual budget. 



Principal Assessor - Humphrey J. "Skip" Movnihan - 658-3675 

The main responsibility of the Board of Assessors is to levy the property 
taxes necessary to meet appropriations and to insure that taxes are allocated 
equitably on the basis of the property owned by each taxpayer. The assessors 
are required to compute the tax rate and assess all real and personal property 
within the Town at fair-market value i.e. close to the true market value, 
except for property qualifying for preferential assessments such as forest, 
agricultural or recreation land. Tax rates depend on three factors: (1) the 
valuation of taxable property, (2) the tax levy or eunount to be raised from 
property taxation and (3) property classification. 

Finance Director - Joseph R. Peters - 658-3531 

The Treasurer/Collector is responsible for the billing and collection of 
monies due the Town including property and motor vehicle excise taxes and 
charges for water, sewer and ambulance services. This department is 
responsible for preparing the weekly payroll. The Finance Director monitors 
the Town's cash flow and arranges for short-term and long-term borrowing. The 
department serves as custodian of all Town funds. All municipal bank accounts 
are controlled by this office. The tax title and foreclosure proceedings for 
non-payment of taxes are handled by the Finance Director. 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

Planning/Conservation Director - Lynn G. Duncan - 658-8238 

The major responsibilities of the Planning Department are to: undertake 
studies of land use, economic development, housing, transportation, and other 
matters related to community development; compile and maintain maps, 
statistics and records related to land use and development; review individual 
proposals for development and for compliance with the subdivision regulations 
and zoning by-law; and prepare applications and administer grants related to 
planning and development. 

The primary function of the Conservation Department is the administration and 
enforcement of the Wetlands Protection Act Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 
131, Section 40. The Act is intended to protect seven public interest issues 
related to wetlands: flood control, storm damage prevention, protection of 
public and private water supply, protection of ground water supply, prevention 
of pollution, protection of fisheries, and protection of land containing 
shellfish. Some of the department's responsibilities include reviewing and 
inspecting development projects to insure their compliance with the Town and 
State wetlands statutes. In addition the department manages several pieces of 
property throughout Town which have been placed into the Town's custody as 
conservation land. 



-15- 




Building Inspector - Daniel W. Paret - 658-4531 



The Building Inspector interprets and enforces the Town's Zoning By-Law, the 
State Uniform Building Code and certain other State codes. This department 
provides assistance to the Zoning Board of Appeals, architects, engineers, 
contractors, and individual property owners in preparing zoning cases, plans 
and permit applications. The Building Inspector is responsible for plumbing, 
gas fitting and wiring inspections. 



Director of Public Health - Gregory P. Erickson - 658-4298 

The department provides two primary types of service. Inspect ional services 
include restaurant, retail food stores, cafeterias in industrial buildings and 
schools, all mobile food trucks, ice creeun trucks and caterers. In addition 
the department conducts percolation tests for the location of septic systems, 
septic system inspections, nuisance inspections and responds to citizens 
complaints regarding dumping, air pollution and noise pollution and hazardous 
waste spills. The department provides public nursing services. This includes 
an annual rabies clinic for dogs, and immunization for influenza, pneumonia, 
polio and various other diseases. The Town Nurse provides blood pressure and 
cholesterol screenings to Town residents. In addition the nurse provides home 
health care visits to elderly residents of the Town. 



PUBLIC SAFETY 



Fire Chief - Daniel R. Stewart - 658-3346 — Emergency Number - 9-1-1 

The main responsibilities of the Wilmington Fire Department are prevention and 
extinguishing of fires. Members of the department make regular fire safety 
inspections of nursing homes, places of public assembly and schools. All 
outdoor burning is regulated by law. These permits may be obtained from the 
Fire Department. The department also issues permits for oil burner 
installations, the storage of flammable liquids such as gasoline and the 
purchase, storage and/or use of explosives such as dynamite, rockets and gun 
powder. The Fire Department provides emergency medical services to residents 
of Wilmington. Firefighters trained as Emergency Medical Technicians are 
assigned as ambulance attendants. Two ambulances provide emergency services 
and urgent patient transport. 



Police Chief - Bobby N. Stewart - 658-5071 — Emergency Number - 9-1-1 

The principle responsibility of the Wilmington Police Department is the 
protection of people and property through enforcement of criminal laws and 
traffic regulations. The department also enforces certain local by-laws and 
provides public education such as the DARE progreun. Animal Control services 
are provided through this department. 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 



Superintendent - Robert P. Palmer - 658-4481 or 658-4484 

The Public Works Department is responsible for highways, trees, parks, 
cemeteries, water, sewers, refuse and recycling. The Highway Division is 
responsible for the care and maintenance of the roads, sidewalks, parking 
areas, and traffic lights. The Engineering Division assists town departments, 
boards and commissions with engineering related projects, such as drainage 
problems, review of subdivision plans and inspection of subdivision roadway 
construction. The Parks & Grounds Division is responsible for the maintenance 
of the Town's commons, parks and recreation areas. The Tree Division is 
responsible for the Town's public shade and orneimental trees and maintenance 
of the trees on the Town common. The Public Works Department is also 
responsible for the operation of the Town's water supply, distribution, 
treatment systems, septic pumping stations, the sanitary sewer collection 



-16- 



systems and the septic disposal station. These responsibilities are assumed 
by the Water & Sewer Department. The Department operates two water treatment 
plants in accordance with regulations established by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and the Federal 
Environmental Agency (EPA) . 

In addition, the Public Works Department operates a curbside recycling program 
for many household items, maintains a comf>osting center for grass and leaf 
disposal and oversees a contract for residential solid waste collection. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT 



Superintendent - Roger J. Lessard - 658-3017 or 658-8124 

The Public Buildings Department is responsible for approximately 516,000 
square feet of building space. The department provides custodial services for 
all school buildings and most of the general government buildings. In 
addition to the custodial services, the department repairs and maintains all 
of the Town's municipal buildings. Public Buildings provides for the complete 
set-up at all Town elections and the annual and special town meetings. 



BUMAN SERVICES 



Elderly Services Director - Edith L. Cunningham - 657-7595 

Programs are provided for the elderly in a wide range of areas, both on an 
individual and group basis. Excunples of the types of programs include health 
information, educational classes, meals on wheels, recreational activities, 
housing assistance, transportation and counselling. Additional services 
included assistance with social security and medicaid concerns. 

Librarv Director - Sarah L. Rueter - 658-2967 

Library services are provided at the Wilmington Memorial Library. The library 
seeks to provide basic educational, informational and recreational library 
services. Staff provides reference and reader services to adults and 
children, furnishing access to the wide spectrum of information available in 
books and other materials. Technical services utilizes the tools of library 
technology to provide the means for informational access and retrieval. The 
library is a member of the Merrimack Valley Library Consortium, a twenty-six 
member consortium of towns in the Merrimack Valley area. This membership 
allows library patrons to access library resources in each of the twenty-six 
member towns. 

Recreation Director - Ronald N. Swasey - 658-4270 

The Recreation Department provides a wide variety of leisure programs for 
children and adults. Some of the programs offered through this department 
include a summer swimming program for children, volleyball for adults, the 
Tiny Tots progreun, summer recreation program for children, ladies fitness, day 
trips to Provincetown and New York City, the Horribles Parade at Halloween and 
a number of other programs. In addition the Recreation Department offers 
resources for travel such as discounts to Walt Disney World. 

Veterans Agent - Paul A. Farrell - 694-2040 

The Veteran's Agent administers a State public assistance progreun for veterans 
and their dependents who qualify. Financial aid which, is reimbursed in a 
large part by the Commonwealth, is rendered in the form of cash grants to 
cover such items as living expenses and medical bills. The Veteran's Agent 
also offers assistance in applying for pensions and other programs 
administered by the United States Veterans Administration. 

-17- 




Town Collector/Treasurer 



COMMITMENTS 

1996 Real Estate $25,437,572.38 

1995 Real Estate 22,917.36 

1996 Personal Property 946,242.58 
1995 Excise 1,592,705.38 
1994 Excise 37,550.78 
Ambulance 225,067.00 
Apportioned Street Paid in Full 8,339.53 
Interest 363.35 
Apportioned Sewer Paid in Full 1,004.67 
Interest 50.23 
Apportioned Street 3,793.63 
Interest 1,545.25 
Apportioned Sewer 33,412.53 
Interest 23,410.63 
Sewer Liens 31,398.43 
Water Liens 115.373.89 

$28,480,747.62 

COLLECTIONS 

Real Estate $23,910,402.97 

Personal Property 1,433,998.19 

Excise 1,156,848.84 

Water Betterments 3,237.62 

Street Betterments 8,992.53 

Sewer Betterments 56,035.21 

Water Liens 114,273.11 

Sewer Liens 34,765.86 

Interest & Charges 182,294.41 

Ambulance 199,780.68 

Lien Certificates 28,175.00 

Betterment Certificates 160.00 

Mark & Clear Fee 14,508.00 

Water Dept Collections 4,818, 785.06 

TOTAL $31,962,257.48 




Congressman Peter G. Torkildsen answered questions for citizens during a "town meeting" in Town 
Hall auditorium. 



-18- 



Board of Assessors 



RECAPITULATION - 1996 FISCAL YEAR 



Total Appropriations (Taxation) 

Total Appropriations (Available) 

Total Deficit 

Special Education 

Energy Conservation 

County Retirement Assessment 

County Tax 

Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 
Air Pollution Districts 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council 
Mosquito Control Project 
Amount Certified by Collector & 

Treasurer for Tax Title 
Overlay of Current Year 
Cherry Sheet Offsets 
M • W • R • A 

Final Court Judgements 
RMV Surcharge 



32,067,617.00 
1.393.492.00 


1,013.00 


1,072,331.00 
45,991.00 
398,377.00 
4,852.00 
4,173.00 
23,333.00 

26,000.00 
666,203.00 
34,764.00 
1,142,944.00 
12,000.00 
11.140.00 



33,461,109.00 



3.443.121.00 
36,904,230.00 



Less Estimated Receipts and Available Funds 



1996 Estimated Receipts from Local 
Aid 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 
Penalties and Interest on Taxes 
Payments in Lieu of Taxes 
Charges for Services - Sewer 
Other Charges for Services 
Fees 
Rentals 

Departmental Revenue - Library 
Departmental Revenue - Cemetery 
Other Department Revenue 
Licenses and Permits 
Special Assessments 
Fines and Forfeits 
Investment Income 
Overestimates 

Voted from Available Funds 



4,533, 
1,372, 
250, 
320, 
1,626, 
175, 
55, 
7, 
10, 
30, 
158, 
301, 
9, 
180, 
95, 
2, 

1.393. 



640.00 
998.00 
000.00 
000.00 
518.00 
000.00 
000.00 
800.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
972.00 
492.00 



10.520.420.00 
26,383,810.00 



REAL ESTATE 



Residential 
Commercial 
Industrial 
Personal Property 



1,001,932,000 @ 12.83 p/t 

115,524,500 @ 27.85 p/t 

336,280,900 @ 27.85 p/t 

33,976,380 @ 27.85 p/t 



12,854,788.00 
3,217,357.00 
9,365,423.00 
946.242.00 

26,383,810.00 



-19- 



Town Clerk 



vital Statiatica - Chapter 46, General Laws ae amended; 



Birtha - Actually recorded for 1995 291 

Marriage Intentiona recorded for 1995 105 

Marriagea recorded for 1995 99 

Deatha recorded for 1995 234 



Chapter 46, Section 15; 

The Town Clerk will furniah to parenta, houaeholdera, phyaiciana and 
regiatered hoapital medical officera applying therefor, blanka for the return 
of birtha aa required by law. 

Chapter 207. Sectiona 19. 20 & 40: 

Chapter 718, Acta of 1979 made changea to Sectiona 19 and 20 along with 
Section 40 and, aa atated before in each annual report, anyone intending to 
marry ahould inquire of thia office to aee if any changea have been made in 
the lawa aa they are changing conatantly. 

Chapter 207. Section 45; 

Thia chapter providea for the availablility of marriage recorda. 
Chapter 114. Sectiona 45, 46: 

One hundred fifty-five burial permita have been iaaued by the Town Clerk aa 
Special Agent to the Board of Health for the year. Nine out-of-atate deatha 
were reported and filed in thia office. Twenty-eight Wilmington veterana were 
buried in Wildwood Cemetery. 

Flammable Permita and Reqistrationa; 

Flammable permita are iaaued by the Board of Selectmen through the Town Clerk. 
Notice ia aent to the owner or occupant of land where the atorage ia located 
on or about April lat for renewal by April 30th of each year. Failure to 
regiater on time or to comply with the Board 'a regulationa may reault in 
revocation of the permit after a public hearing. Eighty-one Flammable Permita 
were iaaued during the year. 

Permita & Recordinqa; 



Uniform Commerical Code Recordinga 490 

Uniform Commerical Code Terminationa 72 

Buaineaa Certificatea and Withdrawala 145 

Federal Lien Recordinga 24 

Federal Lien Releaaea 14 

Fiah and Wildlife Licenaea 594 

Pole & Conduit Locationa 12 

Dog Licenaea 1,273 

Raffle and Bazaar Permita 7 



Other Servicea; 

By virtue of her office, the Town Clerk ia clerk to the Board of Regiatrara. 
In thia capacity, ahe has met with the Board of Registrars on a regular 
monthly meeting night, kept the minutes of same up to date, auperviaed the 
Annual Town Census by mail, kept the voting list up to date and registered 
voters during the regular office houra of the Town Clerk. She alao meeta with 
the Board for special evening sessions to register voters and to certify 
nomination papers for candidates. 



-20- 



Town Meetings & Electione 1995: 



Annual Town Election - April 15 
Annual Town Meeting - April 22 
Special Town Meeting - December 4 



Board of Registrars 

In accordance with Section 1, Chapter 3 of the Town By-laws, meetings of the 
Board of Registrars were held on the second Monday of each month for the 
registration of voters and to conduct business. Under Chapter 616 of the Acts 
of 1958, these meetings were open to the public and press, and were so posted 
in the Town Hall. 

The Board held registration sessions as mandated by Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 51, Sections 26, 28, 31 and 32, and supervised the conduct of 
elections, mandated by Chapter 54, Section 64, Chapter 53, Sections 43 & 63, 
all in accordance with the Town Charter and Inhabitant By-laws Revised of the 
Town of Wilmington. 

The Board also met many times for certification of signatures on nomination 
papers and assisted at Town Election and Town Meeting. 

The Town Clerk attended most of the Town Clerk conferences in order to keep up 
to date with the changing election and census laws. 

The calendar year of 1995 had a total of 11,942 registered voters from our 
listed 19,954 inhabitants. 

The Board of Registrars wants to thank all citizens of the town who returned 
their census forms in 1995 without delay. A true census is an asset to the 
town. 



Constable 



During the year the following notices and warrants were posted by the 
Constable in each of the six (6) precincts: 



Annual Town Meeting and Town Election March 20, 1995 

Special Town Meeting October 25,1995 



Permanent Building Committee 



The Permanent Building Committee will be meeting in the upcoming year to 
develop a Comprehensive Facilities Plan to assess the towns' current and 
future needs for municipal and school buildings. 

Members of the Permanent Building Committee are Roger J. Lessard, Chairman, 
Mark T. Haldane, Paul J. Melaragni and Randi R. Holland. 



-22- 



Fire Department 



It is with great pleasure that I submit the following annual report of the 
operations, activities and accomplishments of the Wilmington Fire Department 
for the year 1995. 

The manual force consists of the Chief, Deputy Chief, five Lieutenants, 
twenty-six Fire Fighters and two civilian Dispatchers. This past year saw 
Fire Fighter Donald Ahem retire after 27 years of service, we wish him good 
luck. Dispatcher Christopher G. Pozzi was appointed as a fire fighter as were 
Walter R. Daley and Charles R. Taylor, Jr. Dispatcher Robert L. Seiple also 
joined the department. 

The following roster is provided: 

Departmental Roster 



Fire Chief 

Daniel R. Stewart 



Deputy Fire Chief 

Walter J. Sowyrda 



Lieutenants 



John Brown, Jr. 

Edmund J. Corcoran, III 



Paul Welch 



Edward G. Bradbury, Jr. 
Joseph T. McMahon 



Fire Fighters 



Robert J. Andersen 
Brian D. Anderson 
David J. Currier 
Walter R. Daley 
Gary J. Donovan 
David R. Feyler 
Linda S. Giles 
Kenneth P. Gray 
Richard J. Hughes 



Daniel M. Hurley, Jr. 
Andrew W. Leverone 
Richard T. McClellan, Jr. 
John F. McDonough 
Terry L. McKenna 
Alfred W. Meuse 
Christopher J. Nee 
Robert E. Patrie, Jr. 
Christopher G. Pozzi 



Stephen D. Robbins 
Gary P. Robichaud 
Daniel J. Stygles 
Charles R. Taylor, Jr. 
Robert W. Varey, Jr. 
Robert E. Vassallo, Jr. 
David P. Woods 
Robert J. Woods, Jr. 



Dispatchers 

Linda K. Abbott Robert L. Seiple 



The department responded to a total of 2,182 calls during 1995. 



Residential Buildings 


6 


Commercial Buildings 


3 


Chimney, Fireplaces & 




Vehicles 


55 


Woodburning Stoves 


2 


Brush, Grass, or Rubbish 


73 


Out of Town Assistance 


173 


Dumpster 


12 


Fire 


41 


False Alarms 


235 


Ambulance/Rescue 


123 


Ambulance/Rescue 


1268 


Haz Mat 


10 


Service Calls 


353 






Hazardous Materials 


1 



Estimated value of property endangered was $11,984,784 
Estimated property loss $204,800 



-23- 



The following is a list of permits issued; 



Black Powder 


1 


Propane 


45 


Blasting 


27 


Report 


40 


Class C Explosive 





Smoke Detector 


195 


Fire Alarm 


156 


Tank 


93 


Flammable Lic[uid 


6 


Miscellaneous 


3 


Oil Burner 


160 


Sprinkler 


64 


Subpoena 


2 


Flammable Decorations 





Truck 


2 


TOTAL 


794 



As rec[uired by law, inspections of all schools, public buildings, nursing 
homes, and flammable storage were inspected by Deputy Chief Walter Sowyrda and 
Lt. Joseph McMahon. Other inspections listed below: 

New Construction, Residential 182 

New Construction, Industrial 65 

Fire Inspection, Industrial/Commercial 170 

Fire Alarm Plan Review 90 



Shift personnel inspected 195 residential properties for smoke detectors in 
compliance with M. G. L. Ch. 148, Sec. 26F. 

All classroom 
grades nursery - 
6 were visited 
by fire fighters 
and discussed 
various safety 
issues under the 
direction of Lt. 
McMahon. 

Community 
Partnership: 
Analog Devices 
purchased new 
fire helmets for 
the whole 
department. The 
value of these 
helmets is 
approximately 
$10,000. 

EPI PEN/ 
Defibrillator: 
All members of 
the department 
completed 

training in the EPI 




Fire Lieutenant Joseph T. McMahon, Fire Fighters Kenneth P. Gray and 
Richard J. Hughes work with kindergarten students on the importance of safety. 



PEN and Defibrillator. 



CISD: Critical Incident Stress Debriefing program is a peer based team 
approach to helping public safety officials in dealing with stress and trauma 
associated with the job. Lt. John Brown attended the rec[uired training to 
become a team member and has been instrumental in forming a new team for our 
immediate area. Winchester Hospital has provided technical and support 
assistance in developing this new program which will greatly help fire 
fighters and their families. 

E-911: The Enhanced 911 emergency telephone system was placed in service this 
past October. This improved system allows for identification of the callers' 
location. Lt. Edmund Corcoran was appointed as 911 Coordinator by previous 
Fire Chief Daniel Wandell and oversaw the completion of the project which took 
several years. A special thanks to Lt. Corcoran for a job well done. 

Fire fighter 1 & 2: Under the direction of Deputy Chief Walter Sowyrda, all 
members were certified by the Massachusetts Firefighting Academy in-house 
program as Fire fighter Level 1 & 2 . 



-24- 



Emergency Management/Regional LEPC: This past year, the towns of Wilmington, 
Tewksbury, Billerica, Chelmsford and Bedford joined together in a Regional 
Local Emergency Planning Committee to study the standardization of emergency 
planning, procedures and funding. 

Diesel exhaust system: A system to remove diesel fumes from the station due 
to the vehicle exhaust was installed and is in service. This system will have 
a direct impact on fire fighter safety and the reduction of cancer and other 
related diseases. 

Zeneca emergency drill: On March 17th a hazardous materials exercise was 
conducted to test the town's ability to work with industry to handle a large 
scale emergency. The exercise was evaluated favorably by the Massachusetts 
Emergency Management Agency. 

SADD: The Fire Department continued to work with the Students Against Drunk 
Driving. The latest project is the writing of a grant application to Harvard 
University School of Government for funding of upcoming programs. Working 
closely with the fire department were faculty member Stoddard Mulhardo and 
student WHS SADD Officers Greg Young, Melissa Kanter, Susan Hall and David 
Ward. 

Fire Alarm Superintendent Paul Welch reports the following for 1995. All 
circuits and master boxes were tested and repairs made. The overhead circuit 
for the West Street Bridge was removed and a new one installed underground in 
conjunction with the new bridge built by the Massachusetts Highway Department. 
All labor and materials costs were reimbursed by the state. Estimates and 
surveys have been done in preparation for the new Burlington Avenue Bridge 
with construction slated to begin in the Spring of 1996. New traffic controls 
were installed in conjunction with the Massachusetts Highway Department road 
improvements at Route 125 at Ballardvale Street and Ballardvale Street at 
Andover Street. These controls (Opticom units) enable responding fire 
apparatus to trip the traffic lights to green thereby making the intersections 
safer for all. The introduction of Opticom was first suggested by the late 
Tom Buckle. It is our long range goal to install all traffic lights in town 
with this system. 

There are now 161 master boxes along with 18 street boxes for a total of 196 
on line. 

The following boxes were added in 1995; 



1211 Cavanaugh Funeral Home, 374 Main Street 

3231 Stelios Restaurant, 144 Lowell Street 

3283 Analog Devices, 804 Woburn Street 

3334 Burger King, 280 Lowell Street 

5311 Visibility, 100 Fordham Road 

5461 Filters Inc, 3 Lopez Road 

5476 Pacific Scientific, 110 Fordheun Road 

6343 Jet Com Inc, 201 Ballardvale Street 

6512 Stafford Mfg, 256 Andover Street 

6613 URS Information Systems, 36 Jonspin Road 

6615 First Choice Inc, 72 Jonspin Road 

6616 Copper at Brass Sales, 56 Jonspin Road 



Department goals include the continued upgrade of apparatus and equipment. 
Improvement of training and operating procedures for all levels of the 
department, analysis of staffing levels and work with appropriate departments 
to develop plans for a long needed new fire station. 

In conclusion, I would like to thank the Town Manager and his staff. Assistant 
Town Manager, Department Heads and staff, the Board of Selectmen and the many 
organizations for their assistance during the past year. 

A very special thank you to the members of the Wilmington Fire Department for 
your support, participation and enthusiasm in providing a well rounded and 
highly professional level of public safety service to the Town of Wilmington. 



-25- 



Fire Department personnel and company off icials critique a mock hazardous spill response at Zeneca 
Resins. 




Fire fighters demonstrate the Jaws of Life at the Chamber of Commerce Expo at Shrine r's Auditorium. 



-26- 



Police Department 



In accordance with the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington, I hereby 
respectfully submit the annual report on the activities of the Wilmington 
Police Department for the year of 1995. 

The enclosed statistical report represents the total for all crimes, 
complaints and incidents reported during the year 1995; and for the most part, 
the corresponding enforcement efforts of the Wilmington Police Department. 
During 1995 the total number of complaints and incidents reported to the 
Police Department decreased slightly from 9,840 incidents in 1994 to 9,729 
during 1995. For the most part these decreases were from throughout the 
various crime categories and service related incidents. Several of the 
serious crime categories decreased significantly during 1995. Breaking and 
entering into homes and buildings decreased by 29% from 101 incidents in 1994 
to 72 during 1995, this follows a 21% decrease in this crime category in 1994. 
The number of armed robberies remained the same at 2 during 1995. Totals for 
assaults and batteries decreased by 20% from 89 in 1994 to 71 in 1995. Motor 
vehicles stolen in Wilmington increased by 49% from 41 in 1994 to 61 in 1995. 
While this is a sharp increase from 1994, the Department views this as an 
adjustment from the unusual, 47% reduction in this crime category during 1994. 

Motor vehicle accidents and traffic congestion continue to be a serious 
community problem. During 1994 the Police Department experienced a 10% 
increase in the motor vehicle accident rate. In 1995 motor vehicle accidents 
increased by 62 accidents from 646 accidents in 1994 to 708 during 1995. This 
increase was to some extent due to worse weather conditions during November 
and December 1995. 

The Police Department has for several years placed a high priority on the 
enforcement of motor vehicle violations. During 1995 the Department cited 
2,797 motor vehicle violations. This is a decrease of 694 from the total 
violations cited during 1994. The following are the totals for some of the 
major areas of concern, speeding violations 577, operators' license violations 
222, unregistered and uninsured 144; and miscellaneous violations 1,512. 
Arrests for operating a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol increased 
by 31 from 44 in 1994 to 75 in 1995. 

Arrests for crimes other than motor vehicle offenses during 1995 totaled 548, 
a 17% increase. During 1995 the Police Department continued to place a high 
priority on alcohol and drug related offenses. As a result, arrest for Liquor 
Law violations increased by 41 from 150 in 1994 to 191 in 1995; and there were 
a total of 44 narcotics arrests made during 1995. In addition to motor 
vehicle and other criminal arrests, the Department placed a total of 151 
persons under protective custody. A total of 774 persons were taken into 
custody by the Police Department during 1995. 

In 1995 the Department completed its first full year of the implementation of 
the Community Policing philosophy. While this is a long term process and 
requires significant change in attitudes and expectations by both the police 
officers and the community, we have made substantial progress. During 1995 
the neighborhood officers responded and followed-up on several hundred problem 
solving assignments in their neighborhoods. In many of these cases they were 
effective in eliminating the problems, and in doing so they have significantly 
reduced the number of repeat calls for those problems. In 1996, the 
Department will increase the deployment of the officers into the 
neighborhoods, not only on problem-solving assignments, but also at block 
parties or other neighborhood social events, in an effort to ensure that every 
resident has an opportunity to meet with their neighborhood officer. During 
1995 all officers received additional training in problem solving techniques 
and in the area of bicycle patrols for special events and for directed 
enforcement efforts for special problems. In May 1995, the Department 
deployed it's first bicycle patrols and received numerous positive comments 
from residents. The Department's first Citizens' Police Academy was conducted 
during 1995 and was viewed a success by both the participants and the officer 
instructors . 



-27- 



In 1996 the Department will continue and expand our proactive involvement in 
each of the neighborhoods. The Department will be conducting two Citizens' 
Police Academies where residents will be provided insight into how the Police 
Department operates; Department Policy and Procedures in areas of interest 
such as Use of Force, Motor Vehicle Pursuits, Citizen Complaints; and the 
elements of crimes which must exist before an arrest or prosecution is made. 
Residents will also be provided information regarding the Police Department's 
goals and objectives. As part of our planning for the future, the Police 
Department, working closely with the Citizens Advisory Committee, will review 
the role of the professional police officer in today's society; will review 
the types of incidents which require a priority response and those which 
should be referred to the Neighborhood Officer; and how the available 
resources of the Department can be more effectively used to address the future 
problems of the community. 




Members of the first Citizens Police Academy. 



The following is a Departmental Roster of the Neighborhood Officers and their 
assignments . 

Wilmington Police Department 
Community Policing 
Neighborhood Assignments 

Supervisor Area 1 Sergeant James Rooney 

lA. Officer James White IB. Officer David Bradbury 

IC. Officer Paul Chalifour ID. Officer Charles Fiore 

Supervisor Area 2 Sergeant Christopher Neville 

2A. Officer Paul Krzeminski 2B. Officer David Axelrod 

2C. Officer Harold Hubby 2D. Officer Francis Hancock 

2E. Officer Joseph Waterhouse 

Supervisor Area 3 Sergeant David McCue 

3A. Officer Joseph Desmond 3B. Officer Stephen Mauriello 

3C. Officer Chester Bruce, III 3D. Officer Thomas McConologue 

Supervisor Area 4 Sergeant Robert Richter 

4A. Officer Paul Jepson 4B. Officer Brian Tully 

4C. Officer Louis Martignetti 4D. Officer John Bossi 

Supervisor Area 5 Sergeant Williaa Gable 

5A. Officer David Sugrue 5B. Officer Steven LaRivee 

5C. Officer Lawrence Redding 5D. Officer Jon Shepard 



-28- 



Business and Commercial Areas 
Sergeant: W. Mark Jepson 

Area 1: Det. Thomas Miller Area 2: Det. Michael McKenna 

Area 3: Det. Patrick King Area 4: Det. Michael Celata 

Area 5: Det. Michael Begonia 



Other members of the department include Deputy Chief Bernard Nally, 
Lieutenants Robert LaRivee and Robert Spencer, Patrolmen Joseph Harris, David 
McCue, Jr., Brian Moon, James Peterson and Robert Shelley and Police 
Clerk/Matrons Margaret Perry and Beth Lessard. The Department makes note of 
personnel changes during 1995. Sergeant Joseph F. Duffy retired after more 
than 30 years with the Department and Patrolman Arthur V. Lynch, Jr. retired 
after 29 years with the Department. The Department thanks each of these 
officers for the contributions made during their careers and wishes both Joe 
and Willy health and happiness in their retirement. Patrolman Robert V. 
Richter was promoted to Sergeant; and Patrolman David McCue, Jr., Patrolman 
Paul Krzeminski and Patrolman Brian M. Moon were appointed as full-time 
officers. 

In closing this report, I want to thank the Town Manager, the Board of 
Selectmen, all Boards and Committees and all Department Heads and their 
workers for their support and cooperation during 1995. 



A special note of thanks to the staff and members of the Wilmington Police 
Department, for without their support and continuing efforts none of our 
accomplishments could have been realized. 




Police Officers Jon C. Shepard and Louis Martignetti stand in salute 
during the Memorial Day Parade. 



-29- 



Wilmington Police Department Statistics 1995 



ARRESTS; 



MOTOR VEHICLE VIOLATIONS; 



Arson 

Assault Sc Battery 
Breaking & Entering 
Disorderly Conduct 
Gambling 
Larceny 

Larceny Motor Vehicle 

Liquor Laws 

Malicious Damage 

Narcotics 

Non/Support 

Rape 

Receiving Stolen Property 

Robbery 

Runaway 

Sex Offenses 

Juvenile 

Other 

TOTAL; 



1 
28 
6 
11 

21 
10 
191 

44 

1 
3 

2 
3 
28 
199 



Seat Belt 

Using Without Authority 
License Violations 
Endangering 

Leave Scene Property Deunage 
Operating Under Influence 
Unregistered/Uninsured 
Speed 

Truck Violations 
Other 

TOTAL VIOLATIONS; 



CITATIONS ISSUED; 



548 



Warnings 
Complaints 
Non-Criminal 
Arrests 



200 
1 

222 
10 
13 
75 
144 
577 
43 
1.512 

2,797 



1,066 
123 
574 
176 



PROTECTIVE CUSTODY; 



TOTAL CITATIONS; 



1,939 



Ages : 

11/12 

13/14 

15 

16 

17 

TOTAL UNDER 18; 

18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 

25/29 
30/34 
35/39 
40/44 
45/49 
50/54 
55/59 
60 & OVER 

TOTAL OVER 18; 

TOTAL PROTECTIVE CUSTODY: 



169 



CRIMES REPORTED ; 

Arson & Bombing (threats) 
Assault & Battery: 
Firearm 
Knife 

Other Weapon 
Aggravated-Hands, etc. 
Simple Assault 

TOTAL ASSAULTS; 



BREAKING & ENTERING ; 

By Force 
No Force 
Attempted B&E 

TOTAL B&E; 



ROBBERY ; 

Firearm 
Other Weapon 
Strong Arm 



46 

1 
1 
27 
32 
10 

71 



53 
5 
14 

72 



TOTAL ROBBERIES; 



SEX CRIMES; 



Rape 

Indecent Exposure 
Indecent A&B 
Other 



3 
7 
2 
11 



TOTAL SEX CRIMES; 



23 



-30- 




LARCENIES: 



MOTOR VEHICLES STOLEN; 



Pocket Picking 

Purse Snatching 

Shoplifting 

From Motor Vehicles 

M/V Parts & Accessories 

Bikes 

From Buildings 
From Coin Machines 
Larceny by check (fraud) 
Other 

TOTAL LARCENIES: 



INCIDENTS REPORTED: 




3 
18 
74 
19 
21 
53 
2 
38 
98 

326 



Autos 

Trucks & Buses 
Other Vehicles 

TOTAL: 



RECOVERED MOTOR VEHICLES; 

Stolen Wilmington and 
recovered Wilmington 

Stolen Wilmington and 
recovered Out of Town 



56 
3 
2 

61 



26 



Alarms Responded to 1,469 

Disturbances 2,360 

Domestic Problems 202 

Emergencies Responded to 448 

Fires Responded to 67 

Juvenile Complaints 268 

Missing Persons Returned 23 

Missing Persons/Still Missing 1 

Prowlers Reported 27 

Miscellaneous Complaints 3,478 

M/V Accidents 708 

Cruisers Dispatched 7,676 

Suicides & Attempts 4 

Sudden Deaths 11 



OTHER DEPARTMENT FUNCTIONS : 

Restraining Orders Served 128 

Parking Tickets Issued 75 

Firearm I.D. Issued 80 

License to Carry Issued 229 

Dealer Permits Issued 2 
Reports to Ins. Co. and 

Attorneys 548 



Stolen Out of Town and 
recovered Wilmington 



TOTAL: 



27 
62 




Animal Control Officer 



Wildwood School students perform a 
skit during DARE Graduation 



ceremonies. 



Number of Complaints 
Number of Animals Picked-Up 
Number of Animals Returned to Owner 
Number of Animals Adopted 
Number of Animals Euthanized 
(this number reflects sick or 
injured wildlife also) 
Number of Animals Picked Up Dead 
Number of Animals Quarantined 
Number of Dog Days at Kennel 
Number of Barn Inspections 
Amount of Citations 

Amount of Reimbursement from County 
Number of Dog Licensed 
Total Working Hours 



1,188 
102 
69 
27 
16 



82 
26 
344 
40 

$325 
$640 
1,273 
1,958 



-31- 



Inspector of Buildings 



The office of the Inspector of Buildings is responsible for enforcing the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Building, Plumbing, Gas and Wiring codes, the Town of Wilmington Zoning 
Bylaw, and for maintaining all related records. In addition, all administrative tasks for 
the Board of Appeals are handled by this office. 

The Inspector of Buildings, as of March 6, 1995, is Dan Paret; the Plumbing and Gas 
Inspector is Bill Harrison; the Wiring Inspector is Art Kelly. Joan Goulet, Toni LaRivee 
and Wendy Martiniello make up the clerical staff, which is shared with the Board of 

Health. 



Our goals for the foreseeable future include 
locating and cataloging all existing records 
processes more manageable. 



1993 





No. 




Valuation 


Dwellings (Single Family) 


114 


$ 


18, 


869, 


900 


Residential Garages 


15 






319, 


353 


Additions & Alterations - 












Residential 


313 




2, 


729, 


991 




442 


$ 


21, 


919, 


244 


Industrial Buildings 


1 






200, 


000 


Utility Buildings 














Additions & Alterations - 












( Non-residential ) 


74 




5, 


184, 


263 


Swimming Pools 


31 






113, 


031 


Signs 


21 






45, 


680 


Public Buildings 














Multi Family Dwellings 














Sheds and Barns 


33 






42, 


335 


Wood Burning Stoves 


17 






16, 


929 


177 


$ 


5, 


602, 


238 



ystematic organization of all new records, 
.nd making the permitting and inspection 







1994 




1995 


No. 




Valuation 


No. 


Valuation 


190 


$ 


33,860,000 


122 


$ 12,201,100 


12 




367,900 


13 


190,500 


325 




2.397.145 


235 


2.426.679 


527 


$ 


36,625,045 


370 


14,818,279 


2 




1,740,000 


3 


7, 500,000 










3 


1,393,000 


61 




6,512,455 


77 


8,423,342 


54 




248,769 


42 


196,653 


20 




68,700 


16 


35,950 






























40 




48,759 


25 


67,191 


20 




16.705 


7 


14.698 


197 


$ 


8,635,388 


183 


17,630,834 



$ 27,521,482 



$ 45,260,433 



$ 32,449,113 



Renewals 
Demolitions 
Fire Damage 
Foundations 
Temporary Trailers 



TOTAL 



3 
18 



g 

21 
640 



150,000 
143,750 






$ 293,750 
$ 27,815,232 



1 
25 
3 
6 

3 

38 

762 



60,000 
242,800 

34,000 
199,700 

10.000 



$ 546,500 
$ 45,806,933 



1 
23 
2 


2 

28 

581 



10,000 
143,250 
156,000 






309,250 
32,758,363 



REPORT OF FEES RECEIVED AND 
TURNED OVER TO TREASURER 



Building Permits 


640 


87,075. 


75 


62 


137,493. 


00 


581 


156,706. 


00 


Wiring Permits 


525 


28,760. 


00 


638 


34,075. 


00 


562 


36,773. 


66 


Gas Permits 


162 


5,915. 


00 


240 


7,729. 


00 


217 


7,274. 


00 


Plumbing Permits 


254 


10,238. 


00 


335 


12, 584. 


00 


304 


12,491. 


00 


Cert, of Inspection 


26 


1,275. 


00 


26 


1,218. 


00 


17 


713. 


00 


Copies 




132. 


07 




36. 


20 




44. 


80 


Court 
















9. 


00 


Industrial Elec. Permits 


24 


3.600. 


00 


25 


3.750. 


00 


29 


4. 350. 


00 




1,631 


$136,863. 


75 


2,001 


$193,135. 


20 


1,710 


$218,361. 


46 



-32- 



Planning & Conservation Department 



The department continuee to provide a high level of service to the community 
in the areas of planning, conservation, housing, transportation and other 
community development activities. The department provides staff support to 
the Planning Board, Conservation Commission and Housing Partnership. The 
Planning Board is responsible for administration of the Subdivision Control 
Act and Site Plan Review, recommendations on zoning amendments and specific 
planning studies. The Conservation Commission is responsible for wetlands 
protection in accordance with the State Wetlands Protection Act. The goal of 
the Housing Partnership is to provide affordable housing for Wilmington 
residents through local initiatives and partnerships with private developers. 
The activities of each board are described in more detail below. 

Departmental goals are: 

Goal 1: To provide technical assistance to the Planning Board through review 
of development plans, including coordination with developers and the 
Community Development Technical Review staff. 

Goal 2: To provide technical assistance to the Conservation Commission in 

administration and enforcement of the State Wetlands Protection Act. 



Goal 3: To provide assistance and information to residents. 

Goal 4: To revise the zoning bylaws and zoning map to enhance the character 
of the town, while encouraging appropriate economic and residential 
development . 

Goal 5; To revise the subdivision rules and regulations to improve the 
development review process and the quality of development. 

Goal 6: To develop and implement a stream maintenance program as an on-going 
town program. 

Goal 7: To encourage the donation of land for conservation purposes. 

Goal 8: To develop local wetland protection bylaws. 

Goal 9: To promote environmental awareness and education. 

Goal 10: To provide technical assistance to the Housing Partnership through 
initiation and implementation of affordable housing efforts, 
including town-owned land development, monitoring of on-going 
developments and review of local initiative projects sponsored by 
developers . 

Goal 11: To implement community development projects, including development 
and oversight of grant programs and comprehensive planning efforts. 

Goal 12: To represent the Town of Wilmington on planning issues at various 
state and regional forums. 

The Planning & Conservation Director is Lynn Goonin Duncan. John Keeley 
serves as Conservation Agent and provides technical assistance to the 
Conservation Commission. John joined the department in June. Secretarial 
support is provided by Senior Clerks Linda Reed and Joann Roberto. 

Special Projects 

The Planning & Conservation Department is responsible for other town projects 
and activities, including various grant programs and the disposition of town- 
owned land. The Director chairs the Community Development Technical Review 
Team, and serves on the Economic Development Commission and the Committee on 
Unaccepted Ways. The Director also serves as the Fair Housing Coordinator, 



-33- 



and the representative to the Transportation Improvement Program (TIP), the 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) and the North Suburban Planning 
Council, acting as the liaison between the town and the state on 
transportation and planning issues. 

Grant Programs 

Wilmington was recently awarded $400,000 through the Ready Resource Fund grant 
progreun by the Executive Office of Communities and Development. The town 
proposes to re-establish the employment assistance program that was originally 
funded through the Small Cities Program and to establish a revolving small 
business loan program for Wilmington businesses, including start-up 
businesses. The job training component will include seminars, workshops, 
individual career counseling and job training grants. The town's goal is to 
assist 120 unemployed and underemployed Wilmington residents. The small 
business loan program will offer loans to manufacturing, retail, wholesale and 
service businesses for machinery and equipment, working capital, building 
improvements, purchase of inventory, fit up and similar projects with a goal 
of job creation. An important aspect of the proposed loan program is the 
commitment from the private lending community; seven local lenders have 
committed matching loan funds. The town anticipates that eleven loans will be 
made to eligible businesses at a below-market interest rate to be determined 
on a case by case basis. The progreun is an exciting opportunity and is 
indicative of how the town helps meet the needs of its residents and small 
businesses. Anyone interested should contact the Planning & Conservation 
Department for more information. 

A small, but important, grant application was submitted to Coastal Zone 
Management for funds to construct sediment barrier walls and new catch basins 
to improve the water quality of Lubber Brook. 

PLANNING BOARD 

New development activity continued at a significant pace comparable to 1994. 
Fourteen subdivision plans were submitted, including twelve definitive plans 
and two preliminary plans, representing a "net" total of 71 lots. The level 
of commercial/industrial activity was at its greatest in at least five years 
as indicated by the number of site plan review applications for commercial and 
industrial projects. A major commercial project is the construction of the 
new Osco Drugstore on Route 38. 

The site plan review process was aunended by vote of Annual Town Meeting 
changing it from an in-house administrative process to a public process under 
the jurisdiction of the Planning Board while maintaining the existing, 
effective coordinated review and tight timeframe necessary to encourage 
desired economic development. 

Subdivisions under construction during the course of the year included 
Stonehedge Estates I and II, Agostino Drive, Andover Heights, Apache Way, Avon 
Street Extension, Flynn Village and Acorn Drive. 

Streets accepted at the 1994 Annual Town Meeting were a portion of Marion 
Street and Sarafina's Way. 

The Planning Board members are appointed by the Town Manager for five year 
terms. Planning Board members serving in 1995 were Richard Longo, Carole 
Hamilton, Austin Rounds, James Diorio and Michael Roache. 



-34- 



Subdivision Control 



Under the authority vested in the Planning Board of the Town of Wilmington by 
M.G.L. Chapter 41, Section 81-Q, the Board reviewed and took action on the 
following subdivision plans: 



Subdivision 



Number 
of Lots 



Action 



Somerset Estates 
Avon Street Extension 
Hopkins Street & Fourth 

Avenue 
Colonial Drive 
Acorn Drive 
Stonehedge Estates II 
Wakefield Avenue Extension 
Blueberry Hill Estates 
Cherry Street 
Ashley (Ashwood) Estates 
Olmstead Avenue 
Country Oaks 
Foley Farm Preliminary 



Of the forty-one 
(41) "Approval 
Not Required" 
(ANR) plans that 
were submitted, 
the Planning 
Board determined 
that 32 plans 
did not require 
approval under 
the Subdivision 
Control Law and 
were endorsed; 5 
plans were 
denied; 2 were 
withdrawn; no 
action was taken 
on 1 plan and 1 
is pending. 

Site Plan Review 



13 
4 

1 
5 
7 
7 
2 
8 
1 
5 
1 
9 
8 



Approved with conditions 
Approved with conditions 



Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Denied 

Pending 

Approved 

Approved 



with 
with 
with 
with 
with 
with 
with 



with 
with 



conditions 
conditions 
conditions 
conditions 
conditions 
conditions 
conditions 



conditions 
conditions 




One of Wilmington 's newest subdivisions — Stonehedge Estates. 



The Board reviewed eighteen (18) applications for site plan approval for 
commercial and industrial property. 

Zoning 

In accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 40A, the Planning Board held required 
statutory public hearings on proposed amendments to the Zoning Bylaw and Map 
and submitted formal reports and recommendations to Town Meeting voters. 
Those recommendations are made part of the report of the Town Meetings 
included in this Annual Report. 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



The Conservation Commission had a very busy year in 1995, reviewing over 113 
wetland permit applications. Public hearings/meetings to review these 
applications totaled 209. These totals again exceeded previous records. 

As prime upland building sites in Wilmington dwindle, land abutting the town's 
abundant wetlands faces increasing development pressure. The Massachusetts 
Wetlands Protection Act (M.G.L. Chapter 131, Section 40) requires that all 
activity within the 100 foot buffer zone of wetlands be permitted by the local 
Conservation Commission. 



-35- 



The Commission adopted new policies in 1995. These include: (1) Notice of 
Intent recommended for new construction within 50 feet of wetlands, (2) 25 
foot building and 15 foot no disturbance setbacks from wetlands, (3) septic 
approval required prior to Conservation approval, (4) 2:1 wetland replacement 
for wetland filling, (5) minor projects may proceed at own risk subject to 
Conservation filing and (6) Conservation will not act upon substantial new 
information presented without adequate time for review. Copies of these 
policies may be obtained at the Planning and Conservation Office. 

Anne Gagnon moved on in 1995 after three years as the Environmental 
Specialist. John Keeley was hired in June as the new Conservation Agent. 
Conservation Commissioners are appointed by the Town Manager. Terms are three 
years. Commissioners John White Jr. and Gary Mercer (Chair) left the 
Commission after many years of service in 1995. Newly appointed Commissioners 
were: Gail Mahar, Judith Waterhouse and Richard Patterson. Continuing to 
serve on the Commission in 1995 were: Lynne Guzinski (new Chair), James 
Morris, William Gately and Barbara Sullivan. 

The Second Annual Wilmington Watershed Cleanup was held on September 16. The 
cleanup was organized by a committee made up of Anne Linehan, Iva Rideout and 
Martha Stevenson. Once again, a coalition of volunteers, town departments, 
and local developers and businesses worked together to achieve a great 
success. Seven primary sites were cleaned and tons of debris removed. 

A 23.96 acre parcel abutting Stonehedge Estates was donated to the 
Conservation Commission by Doherty-Lopez Corp. Another 17,280 square foot 
parcel was donated by Louis A. Pocharski near Buckingham Estates. 

Any questions about wetlands, laws and regulations, and filing procedures are 
welcomed by John Keeley, Conservation Agent. 

Statistical Data 



Filing Fees Collected $8,199.85 

Notices of Intent Filed 38 

Requests for Determinations of Applicability 76 
Public Hearings/Meetings Held 

(including continuances) 210 

Extension Permits Requested/Issued/Denied 6/2/2 

Enforcement Orders Issued 8 

Violation Notices Issued 6 

Complaints Investigated 26 

Certificates of Compliance Requested/Issued 38/25 

Decisions Appealed/Withdrawn 5/1 

Orders of Conditions/Determinations pending 6/2 

Order of Conditions Issued/Denied/Withdrawn 26/5/1 

Site Inspections Conducted (Staff) 521 

Emergency Certifications Issued 15 

Bylaw Subcommittee Meetings Held 

Request for Insignificant Change/Approved 24/19 
Negative Determinations with Conditions/Positive/ 

Withdrawn 60/14/4 

Request for Amendments/Issued/Denied 10/9/1 



-36- 



Notices of Intent 



DEP 




FILE # 


APPLICANT 




*S U A 


Mary Nelson 




An 


Eafl HuDcer 




APT 


Theodora Trust 


344- 


488 


Analog Devices 


344- 


489 


Marcy Realty 






Trust 


344- 


490 


Melvin Keough 


344- 


491 


Universe 






Construction 


^ A A — 


AQO 


Ann & Ed Moran 


344- 


493 


Daniel Shelley 


344- 


494 


Chester Hall 


"iAA — 


H7 o 


Chester Hall 


<3HH 




Mark Lopez 






L.A. Associates, 






Inc . 


344- 


'499 


Joseph Langone 


344- 


500 


P.G.A. Realty 






Trust 




3 u ± 


Joseph Langone 


344- 


«^ w ^ 


Gina Christa 






Realty Trust 






Reading Realty 






Trust 


3AA- 




Merrimac Drive 






Development 






Trust 


3d4- 


*J W ^ 


Unai Garabieta 


344- 


•506 


Paul Butt 




• •^07 

WW / 


Jocelyn II 






Realty Trust 


344- 


•508 


Colonial Gas 


344- 


•509 


Craig Newhouse 


344- 


•510 


Universe 






Construction 




W X X 


Michael Elia 


3AA- 


.t; 1 5 

w 


Denis St Mary Ann 






Hanegan 




D X J 


Marcy Realty 






Trust 


344- 


•514 


Town of 






Wilmington 


344- 


■515 


Supervalu 


344- 


-516 


Craig Newhouse 


344- 


-517 


Marie LoDez 


344- 


-518 


Stelio'8 Rest. 


344- 


-519 


Josephine M. 






LeClair 


344- 


-520 


Ralph Newhouse, 






Jr. 


344- 


-521 


Theodora Trust 


344- 


-522 


Paul Butt 


344- 


-523 


Woodhill Realty 



LOCATION (MAP/ PARCEL 1 

Mather & Walnut - 6/24 

Woburn Street 

Lots D & E - 58/19 

111 & 112 West Street - 
71/16, 18 

30 Industrial Way - 46/130 
Mystic Ave. Somerset 

Estates - 78/lA & 65/22A & 22B 

Magazine Road - 44/27 
Stonehedge Drive - 107/17 
Lot 17 

5 Chapman Avenue - 94/82 

Park Avenue - 34/17 

Lot 2 Summer St. - 84/64A 

Lot 3 Summer St. - 84/89 

Lot 14 Stonehedge Drive - 18/18 

& Part of 18F 
Avon Street - 9/18, 19 & 21C 

Lot 1 Agostino - 53/141 
Drive 

Lots 1, 2 and 3 - Rl/18 

Upton Drive 
Lot 10 Agostino - 53/Part of 5B 

Drive 

4 St. Paul Street - 53/28 
Lot 3 Concord Street - 78/3B 
Middlesex Avenue - 65/5B 

31 Boutwell Street - 19/36 

324 Woburn Street - 86/14 
33 High Street - 88/18 

Frisco Road right-of-way 
Cherry Street 69/65 
Stonehedge Lot 7 - 18/18 & part 
of 18F 

383 Middlesex Avenue - 88/part of 

Parcels 8B and 8C 
9 Hamlin Lane - 80/56 

Nottingham Drive - 18/14 

Lots 4 fic 5 
Forest Street North of Clinton St. 

Map 7 

340 Ballardvale Street - R3/44 
2 Si 4 Birch Rd. - 31/27 
Stonehedge Drive - 107/1 
144 Lowell Street - 49/2 & 3 
7 Congress Street - 7/26 

West Street - 74/Part of Parcel 2 

West Street - 71/16, 18, 111 & 112 
Woburn Street - 86/Part of Parcel 2, 

2A,4,8B & 8C 
Fernbanks Road - 15/109 



DECISION 

Denied 

(Appealed) 

Denied 

(Appealed) 

(Re-opened) 

Approved 
Approved 

Approved 

(Appealed) 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Pending 

Pending 

Approved 
Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Denied 

(Appealed) 

Denied 

Approved 

Approved 

Denied 
(Appealed) 
Approved 
Approved 

Approved 
Approved 
Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Pending 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Withdrawn 

Approved 

Pending 
Pending 

Pending 



-37- 



Amendments to Orders of Condition Requested 



DEP 
FILE f 

344-339 

344-433 

344-452 



344-453 
344-483 
344-497 



APPLICANT 



LOCATION (MAP/ PARCEL 1 



Belanger & Lot 59 Fiorenza Drive - 

Foley R3/3, 19, 21, 33 & 34 

Jeffrey Miller Kilmarnock Street Lot B - 74/Part of 
Parcel 3 

Thomas Realty Buckingham Estates 9/Part of Parcel 
67, 10/8, 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, 17, 
24 & 26 

Mark Lopez Stonehedge Drive Lot 13 - 107/13 

Olin Corp. 51 Fames Street - 37/10 

Mark Lopez Stonehedge Drive Lot 14 - 18/18 & 

Part of Parcel 18F 



344-506 Paul Butt 



Lot A 324 Woburn Street - 86/14 



Determinations of Applicability Recmested 



APPLICANT 
Mark Lopez 
Robert Scott 

Northeastern 
Development 
Corporation 

Richard Green 

Kevin O'Connell 
Carl Abell 
Daniel Shelley 
David Sugrue 

Mark Lopez 
Northeastern 

Development 

Corporation 
Northeastern 

Development 

Corporation 
Richard 

Dickerson 
Ralph Newhouse 
Marcy Realty 
Joseph Langone 
Robert 

Frongillo 
Wendell Holmes 
Albert & Eileen 

Clark 
Mark & Chris 

Blaisdell 
Jared Wentzell 
Northeastern 

Development 

Corporation 
Craig Newhouse 
Craig Newhouse 
Sacco Realty 

Trust 
Gregory Eraser 
John Chang/Jean 

McAuliffe 
Rex Perkins 



LOCATION 
Lot 15 Stonehedge Drive 
7 Harold Avenue 
off Everett Avenue 

12 Kansas Road 

31 Church Street 
123 Main Street 
Park Avenue 
4 Fall Street 

Stonehedge Drive, Lot 3 
Agostino Drive, Lot 9 

Agostino Drive, Lot 7 



449 Middlesex Avenue, 
Lot 97 

31 High Street 

11 Boutwell Street 
Concord Street, Lot 2 
10 Davis Road 

17 Mackey Road 

32 Auburn Avenue 

18 Vermont Road 

7 Congress Street 
Agostino Drive, Lot 8 



4 Birch Road 
2 Birch Road 
10 Agostino Drive 

17 Dadant Drive 
One Castle Drive 

One Jewel Drive 



MAP /PARCEL 

107/22, 23, 24, 

25 & 30 
23/105 

54/7A 



36/135, 136, Part 

of 117 & 186 
4/63 
45/36 
34/17 

30/48A & Part of 
47 

18/18 & Part of 18F 
53/Part of 5B 



53/Part of 5B 

96/2 

88/18 
18/14 
78/3A 
55/140 

62/47A & 45 
323/100 

35/9 

7/26 

53/Part of 5B 



DECISION 
Approved 
Approved 
Approved 



Approved 
Approved 
Approved 



Pending 

DETERMINATION 
ISSUED 

Negative 

Negat ive 

Withdrawn 



Negative 

Negative 
Negative 
Withdrawn 
Negative 

Negative 
Negative 



Negative 

Negative 

Positive 
Positive 
Negative 
Negative 

Negative 
Positive 

Negative 

Positive 
Negative 



31/13A & Part of 27A Positive 
21/13A & Part of 27A Positive 
53/Part of 5B Positive 



78/3A 
27/26 

24/205 



Negative 
Negative 

Negative 



-38- 



Determinations of Applicability Recmested 



APPLICANT 
Robert Bennett 

Robert & 

Penelope 

Torrani 
Doug & Michele 

Hudson 
Analog Devices 
H & S Realty 
Analog Devices 
John & Diane 

Perkins 
William Lynch 
Karl Nesline 
01 in Corp. 

Colonial Gas 
Co. 

Richard Green, 

Jr. 
Northgate 

Development 

Association, 

Dennis Sargent 
Emm amoral 

Cossotos 
Dan Kindred 
John Donato 
Steven Melzar 
Leland H. 

Jackson, Jr. 
Paul Butt 
Zeneca Resins 
John Elia 
Wen-Der Wang 
John Korajczyk 
Helen Pilla 
Roland Pellerin 
Merrimack Drive 

Development 
Brenda & John 

Walsh 
Michael McCoy 
Agfa Division, 

Bayer Corp. 
Town of 

Wilmington 
Howland 

Development 
Joyce Ripianzi 
Northeastern 

Development 

Corp. 
Hazel O'Brien 
Textron Defense 

System 
Town of 

Wilmington 
Philip J. Rhind 
Robert Ings 
Debra Cremens 
Analog Devices 
Analog Devices 
Michael Mclnnis 



LOCATION 

22 Vermont Road 

Lot 18 
10 Douglas Avenue 



10 Wedgewood Avenue 

804 Woburn Street 
144 Lowell Street 
804 Woburn Street 
7 Towpath Drive 

19 Glendale Circle 
22 Allenhurst Way 
Chestnut Street, Main 

Street, Belvedere Street 
Richmond Street 

12 Kansas Road 

7 Towpath Drive 



18 Federal Street 
Molloy Road 

8 Cedarcrest Road, Lot 21 
Burlington Avenue 
69 Wildwood Street 

Woburn Street 
730 Main Street 
Middlesex Avenue 
61 Faulkner Avenue 
3501 Pouliot Place 
135 Wildwood Street 
56 Houghton Road 
246 Middlesex Avenue 

15 Crystal Road 

110 Lowell Street 
148 Olde Ballardvale 

Culverts - Town wide 

Ballardvale Street 

48 Cunningham Street 
Wakefield Avenue 



18 Hobson Avenue 
201 Lowell Street 

66 Forest Street 

86 Burlington Avenue 
9 Lake Street 
43 Agostino Drive 
804 Woburn Street 
804 Woburn Street 
15 Patches Pond Lane 



MAP /PARCEL 
35/60B 
79/123 

21/9A 

47/2 
49/3 
47/2 
28/33 

66/73 
49/149 

14/5 & 6, 26/2 & 

9, 27/llE 
Within roadway 

limits 
36/36 

28/33 



65/21 

40/Part of 154 

81/55A 

7/106 

63/2 

89/Parts of 8B & 8C 
39/8 

89/10, 13A, 8, 13B 
69/34B 

106/78 Lot 79 

63/1 

20/108 

65/5B 

58/319 

49/57D & 57E 
R2/Lot 9 



R3/49 

69/111 
9/75 Lot 3 



45/4 
39/73A 

7/2 

29/Part of 15 
55/212 

53/Part of 5B 

47/2 

47/2 

29/60 



DETERMINATION 
ISSUED 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 
Positive 
Negative 
Negative 

Negative 
Negative 
Negative 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 



Negative 

Negative 
Negative 
Negative 
Negative 

Positive 

Negative 

Withdrawn 

Negative 

Negative 

Negative 

Positive 

Negative 

Negative 

Withdrawn 
Negative 

Negative 

Positive 

Negative 
Negative 



Negative 
Negative 

Negative 

Positive 
Negative 
Negative 
Negative 
Positive 
Negative 



-39- 



Determinations of Applicability Requested 
APPLICANT LOCATION 



MAP /PARCEL 



DETERMINATION 
ISSUED 



James W. Mangano 
Alexander 

Athanaseiou 
Analog Devices 
Nynex 

Elaine 

Gottlander 
Mark Lopez 
Olin Corp. 



Safford St. & Lawson Rd. 
210 Chestnut Street 

804 Woburn Street 
Route 62 Salem Street & 

Woburn Street 
23 Arlene Avenue 

Mystic Avenue 

Jewel Drive, Main Street & 

Eames Street Roadway 

Easement 



17/lots 6 & 7 
14/lA 

47/2 
95/103 

90/5 

65/22A 



Positive 
Negative 

Negative 
Negative 

Negative 

Positive 
Pending 




Once again town departments and employees, businesses, contractors and volunteers of all ages 
combined their efforts during the 2nd Annual Watershed Cleanup. 




-40- 



Housing Partnerhip 



The Housing Partnership continued its efforts to create affordable housing for 
Wilmington residents. Two significant projects dominated the work of the 
Housing Partnership during 1995 - Avon Street Extension and Saddle Oak 
Estates. 

Avon Street Extension is a town initiated development on a combination of town 
and privately owned land. It includes four single family homes, one of which 
is being sold to a Wilmington resident for the affordable sales price of 
$94,500. A deed restriction ensures that the home will remain affordable for 
families in the future. The resident was selected through a lottery process. 
The roadway is partially complete and it is expected that the affordable home 
will be occupied by April 1996. The proposed homes will be consistent with 
the character of the neighborhood. This development was permitted through the 
standard, local permitting process, rather than utilizing the State Local 
Initiative Progreun. The advantage is that the affordable home could be set- 
aside for a Wilmington resident. However, the process was lengthier, as well 
as more costly. 

Saddle Oak Estates, located off West Street, is a Local Initiative Project 
initiated by a private developer. Thirty-six single family homes with garages 
are proposed, of which nine will be affordable. Of the nine affordable homes, 
six will be set aside for Wilmington residents. The affordable homes will be 
sold for $94,500. The Housing Partnership held several public meetings to 
discuss the proposed development with the neighborhood. Based on these 
meetings the plan was revised by the developer, incorporating such changes as 
increasing the minimum lot size from 5,000 square feet to 7,500 square feet 
and establishing a minimum front yard setback. The project was supported by 
the Housing Partnership and the Board of Selectmen. Approvals from the State, 
the Board of Appeals and the Conservation Commission are also required. 

The Partnership also continued to monitor progress at on-going affordable 
housing developments, including Buckingheun Estates. As of December 1995, 
three affordable homes and eight market-rate homes at Buckingham Estates were 
sold. 

Housing Partnership members throughout 1995 included Chair Mark Haldane, Vice- 
Chair Raymond Forest, Charles Boyle, Robert Cain, Rocco DePasquale, Gregory 
Erickson, Carole Hamilton, Dr. James Ficociello, and Lester White. Daniel 
Wandell, Alfred Meegan, Jr. and Rev. Herbert Taylor were appointed as new 
members. The town accepted resignations from Melvin Keough, Bruce MacDonald 
and Rev. Thomas Dean and thanks them for their dedicated service. The 
Partnership meets the second Thursday of each month and welcomes interested 
residents to attend. 




Construction of Avon Street Extension. 



Accepted Streets 



STREET 

Adams Street from 

Adelaide Street from 

Agostino Drive from 

Aldrich Road from 

Allgrove Lane from 

Allenhurst Way from 

Allen Park Drive from 

Andover Street from 

Andover Street from 

Andrew Street from 

Anthony Avenue from 

Apollo Drive from 

Appletree Lane from 

Arlene Avenue from 

Auburn Avenue from 

Ayotte Street from 

Baker Street from 

Baland Road from 

Ballardvale St. from 

Ballardvale St. from 

Bancroft Street from 

Barbara Avenue from 

Beacon Street from 

Beech Street from 

Beeching Avenue from 

Belmont Avenue from 

Benson Road from 

Biggar Avenue from 

Birchwood Road from 

Birchwood Road from 

Blanchard Road from 

Boutwell Street from 

Brand Avenue from 

Brand Avenue from 

Brattle Street from 

Brentwood Avenue from 

Bridge Lane from 

Bridge Lane from 

Broad Street from 

Burlington Avenue from 

Burnap Street from 

Burnap Street from 

Burt Road from 

Butters Row from 

Buzzell Drive from 

Canal Street from 

Carolyn Road from 

Carson Avenue from 

Carter Lane from 

Catherine Avenue from 

Cedar Street from 

Cedar Crest Road from 

Central Street from 

Chandler Road from 



LOCATION 

Middlesex Avenue to Parker Street 
Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 
Gandalf Way 

Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 
Woburn Street 
Woburn Street 

Fairmont Avenue to Fairmont Avenue 
Salem Street 

Andover Line to beyond Woburn Street 
Aldrich Road to beyond Houghton Road 
Salem Street to Catherine Avenue 
Charlotte Road to Draper Drive 
Chestnut Street to Towpath Drive 
Salem Street to Ella Avenue 
Shawsheen Avenue 
Westdale Avenue to Crest Avenue 

Brand Avenue to beyond Phillips Ave. 

Ballardvale Street 

Salem Street to Route 125 

Route 12 5 to Andover Line 

Liberty Street 

Anthony Avenue to Dorothy Avenue 
Church Street to Belmont Avenue 
Burlington Avenue to Byron Street 
Cunninghcun Street to Faulkner Ave. 
Columbia Street to State Street 
Radcliff Road to Tewksbury Line 
Salem Street to Ring Avenue 
Shady Lane Drive 
Judith Road 
Kendall Road 

Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 
Bridge Lane 

Baker Street to beyond Wisser Street 
Massachusetts Avenue to Garden Ave. 
Woburn Street to Woods ide Avenue 
Shawsheen Avenue 

Main Street to beyond Brand Avenue 
King Street 

Main Street to Burlington Line 
Grove Avenue 
Winchell Road 

Cedar Street to beyond Water Street 
Main Street to Chestnut Street 
Draper Drive to Evans Drive 

Shawsheen Avenue to Burt Road 
North Street to Marcia Road 
Marie Drive to beyond Hathaway Road 
Shawsheen Ave. to beyond Norfolk Ave. 
Anthony Avenue to Arlene Avenue 
Burt Road to Harris Street 
Pinewood Road to Judith Road 
Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 
Adams Street to Kelley Road 



LENGTH 


DATE(S) ACCEPTED 


2,915 






666 


X 7 / W 




999 


1979 




6,740 


1894 




H f KJ 


X 7 7 




1,161 


X 7 7 *• 




2,319 


X 7 / X 


1 QPA 
X704 


180 


1 fiQ4 

X O 7 H 




11,300 


X O 7 *■ 


1 Q7n 

X 7 / 


435 


X 7 O 9 




300 


X 7 O O 




300 


X 7 / X 




994 


19Q0 

X 7 7 W 




3,754 


X 7 u u 


X 7 / O 


755 


1 Q4^ 

X 7 




240 


1947 




684 


X 7 4 3 




540 


1 Q79 

X 7 / ^ 




965 






12,000 


18Q4 


X 7 O ^ 


400 


X 7 S ^ 




850 


X 7 w O 




970 


1915 




1,005 


1 Q47 

X 7 *• / 




440 


X 7 *^ 7 




980 


X 7 J J 




616 


1 Q7 1 

X 7 / X 




1,282 


X 7 / ^ 




1,197 


X 7 3 ^ 




400 


X 7 3 O 




625 


1989 




4,144 


1894 


1960 1971 


510 


1933 


1943 


7 3 V./ 


1 <3 1 "? 

X 7 ^ 


X 7 *v J 


1,066 


1945 




1,017 


1 9')8 

X 7 *J O 




455 


1 8<34 

X W 7 *• 




754 


1 flQ4 

X O 7 •» 




1,377 


1 Q54 

X 7 (J *V 




8,588 


1 fiQ4 

X O 7 "T 




1, 145 


X 7 3 ^ 




484 


1 Q A 




1,653 


1945 


1946 


3,577 


1894 




600 


1971 




1,505 


1939 


1955 


1,268 


1960 


1971 


1,017 


1961 




1,411 


1957 




1,000 


1966 




687 


1945 




1, 100 


1963 




552 


1950 




400 


1957 





-42- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH 



DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Chapman Avenue from 

Charlotte Road from 

Chase Road from 

Chestnut Street from 

Church Street from 

Clark Street from 

Clorinda Road from 

Cochrane Road from 

Columbia Street from 

Concord Street from 

Congress Street from 

Cook Avenue from 

Coolidge Road from 

Corey Avenue from 

Cornell Place from 

Cottage Street from 

Crest Avenue from 

Cross Street from 

Cunninghaim St. from 

Cushing Drive from 

Cypress Street from 

Dadant Drive from 

Davis Road from 

Dayton Road from 

Dell Drive from 

Dexter Street from 

Dobson Street from 

Dorchester Street from 

Dorothy Avenue from 

Douglas Avenue from 

Draper Drive from 

Drury Lane from 

Dublin Avenue from 

Dunton Road from 

Eames Street from 

Earles Row from 

Edward Road from 

Ella Avenue from 

El wood Road from 

Emerson Street from 

Englewood Drive from 

Evans Drive from 

Everett Avenue from 

Fairfield Road from 

Fairmeadow Road from 

Fairmont Avenue from 

Fairview Avenue from 

Faneuil Drive from 

Faulkner Avenue from 

Fay Street from 

Federal Street from 

Ferguson Road from 

Flagstaff Road from 

Fletcher Lane from 

Floradale Avenue from 

Fordhoun Road from 



Hathaway Road to Sheridan Road 
Gunderson Rd. to beyond Apollo Dr. 
Hathaway Road 

Burlington Avenue to Woburn Line 
Main Street to Middlesex Avenue 
Main Street to Church Street 
Agostino Drive 
Forest Street to Wabash Road 
Church St. to beyond Belmont Avenue 
Federal Street to North Reading Line 
Forest Street to Burlington Line 
Main Street 
Hathaway Road 

Canal Street to Grand Street 
Fordham Road 
Main Street 
Ayotte Street 

Main Street to Lowell Street 
Salem Street to Beeching Ave 
Shawsheen Avenue 
Glen Road 

North Street to North Street 
Main Street 
Hathaway Road 
Burlington Avenue 
Main Street 

Glen Road to beyond Garden Avenue 
Billerica Line 

Arlene Avenue to Barbara Avenue 
Palmer Way 

Gunderson Road to Evans Drive 
Glen Road to School Street 
Main Street 
Nassau Avenue 

Main Street to Woburn Street 
Route 62 

Forest Street to beyond Baldwin Rd. 
Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 
Forest Street 

Faulkner Avenue to Oakwood Road 
Kenwood Drive 

Gunderson Road to Draper Drive 
Faulkner Avenue to Cunningham St. 

Main Street 

Nichols Street to Nichols Street 

Molloy Road 

State Street 

Massachusetts Avenue 

to beyond Harvard Avenue 

Glen Road to Jacobs Street 

Glen Road to Garden Avenue 

Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 

Shawsheen Avenue 

Nichols Street 

Kilmarnock Street to Morgan Road 
Burlington Avenue 
North Reading Line 



1 


,575 


1951 




859 


1971 




297 


1953 


11 


,480 


1894 


4 


,285 


1894 


2 


,470 


1894 




887 


1979 




800 


1947 


1 


,150 


1908 


5 


,803 


1894 




977 


1939 




fii 
o±j 






270 


1951 




366 


1951 




747 


1982 




927 


1954 




558 


1947 




697 


1894 


2 


,447 


1944 




990 


1993 




260 


1951 


1 


,760 


1964 




500 


1952 




170 


1951 


± 


1QA 

, /y4 


1 Q C Q 




480 


1979 


1 


,402 


1954 


1 


,214 


1951 


1 


,490 


1960 


1 


,017 


1989 


1 


,560 


1959 




633 


1963 




500 


1951 




649 


1956 


3 


,200 


1894 




820 


1994 




450 


1947 


1 


,043 


1978 






J.7O0 




590 


1951 




455 


1971 


2 


,071 


1971 




480 


1979 


1 


,299 


1946 


2 


,328 


1958 




952 


1971 




648 


1933 




790 


1950 


1 


,946 


1944 




714 


1938 


5 


,740 


1894 


1 


,073 


1967 




587 


1989 




792 


1977 




627 


1970 


3 


,714 


1971 



1971 



1971 



1953 
1945 



-43- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH 



DATE ( S ) ACCEPTED 



Forest Street 
Fox Run Drive 
Franklin Avenue 
Frederick Drive 
Freeport Drive 

Gandalf Way 
Gatehouse Lane 
Gearty Street 
Glen Road 
Glendale Circle 
Glenview Road 
Gloria Way 
Gowing Road 
Grace Drive 
Grand Avenue 
Grant Street 
Great Neck Drive 
Grove Avenue 
Grove Street 
Gunderson Road 

Heunlin Lane 
Hanover Street 
Hanson Road 
Hardin Street 
Harnden Street 
Harold Avenue 
Harris Street 
Harvard Avenue 
Hathaway Road 
Hawthorne Road 
Heather Drive 
Henry L. Drive 
High Street 
Hillside Way 
Hilltop Road 
Hobson Avenue 
Hopkins Street 
Houghton Road 

Industrial Way 

Jac[uith Road 
Jere Road 
Jewel Drive 
Jones Avenue 
Jonspin Road 
Judith Road 

Kajin Way 
Kelley Road 
Kendall Street 
Kenwood Avenue 
Kiernan Avenue 
Kilmarnock Street 
King Street 
King Street Ext. 
Kirk Street 



from Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 
from High Street 

from Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 

from Salem Street 

from Park Street to Lucaya Circle 

from Glen Road to Agostino Drive 
from Towpath Road 
from Ring Avenue 

from Middlesex Avenue to Main Street 

from Glen Road to Lawrence Street 

from Suncrest Avenue 

from Broad Street 

from Park Street to Marcus Road 

from Shawsheen Ave. to beyond Melody Lane 

from Corey Avenue 

from Federal Street 

from Woburn Street 

from Main Street to Lake Street 

from Reading Line 

from Marie Drive to beyond Evans Drive 

from Lawrence Street 

from Atlantic Avenue 

from Woodland Road 

from Aldrich Road to Jaquith Road 

from Main Street to Glen Road 

from Shawsheen Avenue to Reed Street 

from Burlington Avenue to Cedar Street 

from Main Street to River Street 

from Woburn Street to Evans Drive 

from Woburn Street 

from Freeport Drive to North Reading Line 
from Woburn Street 

from Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 
from Chestnut Street to Burlington Line 
from Suncrest Avenue 

from Pine Avenue to beyond Wisser Street 
from Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 
from Kendall Street to Andrew Street 

from Woburn Street to West Street 

from Shawsheen Avenue 

from Fairmeadow Road to Fairmeadow Road 
from Eames Street 
from Glen Road 
from Andover Street 

from Cedar Crest Road to Birchwood Road 

from Woburn Street 
from Chandler Road 

from Aldrich Road to Blanchard Road 
from Woburn St. to beyond Englewood Dr. 
from Lowell Street to beyond Naples Road 
from West Street to beyond Morgan Road 
from Glen Road to Broad Street 
from Glen Road 
from Main Street 



4 


, 100 


1894 




975 


1989 




739 


1978 


1 


, 070 


1966 


2 


, 086 


1979 




549 


1979 




380 


1994 




627 


1989 


6 


, 870 


1894 


1 


, 304 


1952 




365 


1959 




770 


1989 




941 


1956 


2 


,514 


1966 




815 


1952 




780 


1943 




536 


1989 


4 


, 147 


1910 




120 


1957 


1 


, 506 


1959 




540 


1962 




574 


1988 




838 


1969 




428 


1951 




600 


1895 


1 


, 312 


1971 




806 


1945 




430 


1951 


3 


,270 


1951 




230 


1956 


1 


,286 


1979 




651 


1993 


3 


, 585 


1894 


2 


, 230 


1914 




C A 

364 


1959 


1 


, 560 


1945 


3 


, 051 


1894 


1 


,702 


1985 


4 


, 430 


1974 


1 


, 398 


1938 


1 


, 248 


1968 


1 


, 303 


1985 




717 


1940 


3 


, 800 


1993 




400 


1953 




455 


1989 




923 


1957 


1 


,420 


1945 


1 


,725 


1970 




693 


1958 


1 


,840 


1894 


2 


,400 


1940 




487 


1979 




575 


1951 



1976 



1966 



1953 1959 



1951 
1972 



1952 
1975 



1949 1951 



1971 



1945 



-44- 



STREET 




LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE(S) ACCEPTED 


Lake Street 


from 


Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 


3,855 


1894 




Lang Street 


from 


Bancroft Street 


409 


1952 




Laurel Avenue 


from 


Parker Street to Molloy Road 


659 


1950 




Lawrence Court 


from 


Lawrence Street 


728 


1956 




Lawrence Street 


from 


Glen Road to Shady Lane Drive 


4,013 


1956 




Ledgewood Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


383 


1959 




Lexington Street 


from 


Cunningheun Street to Morningside Dr. 


714 


1974 




Liberty Street 


from 


Federal Street 


740 


1943 




Lincoln Street 


from 


Federal Street 


720 


1943 




Linda Road 


from 


High Street to beyond Pineridge Road 


1,760 


1950 




Lloyd Road 


from 


Main Street 


1,050 


1951 




Lockwood Road 


from 


Ballardvale Street 


977 


1957 




Longview Road 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


650 


1959 




Lorin Drive 


from 


Swain Road 


560 


1992 




Loumac Road 


from 


Drury Lane 


510 


1963 




Lowell Street 


from 


Main Street to Reading Line 


10,152 


1894 


1978 


Lowell St. Park 


from 


Lowell Street 


580 


1908 


1957 1958 


Lucaya Circle 


from 


Heather Drive to Freeport Drive 


2,469 


1979 




Mackey Road 


from 


Federal Street 


250 


1943 




Magazine Road 


from 


Wisser Street 


320 


1973 




Magazine Street 


from 


Taplin Avenue 


190 


1973 




Main Street 


from 


Tewksbury Line to Woburn Line 


21,387 


1894 




Marcia Road 


from 


North Street to beyond Carolyn Rd. 


2,806 


1962 


1971 


Marcus Road 


from 


Cowing Road 


2,315 


1 o c o 

19 58 




Marie Drive 


from 


Woburn St. to beyond Gunderson Road 


1,525 


1961 


1966 


Marion Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to beyond 












Clifton Street 


1,876 


1945 




Marion Street 


from 


Marion St. westerly to Marion St. 


975 


1995 




Marjorie Road 


from 


Main Street 


1,392 


1951 




Massachusetts Ave 


. from 


Main Street to beyond Brattle St. 


810 


1945 




McDonald Road 


from 


Salem Street 


2,621 


1944 




Meadow Lane 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


364 


1957 




Melody Lane 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Grace Drive 


245 


1966 




Middlesex Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Salem Street 


12,140 


1894 




Miles Street 


from 


Main Street to Hobson Avenue 


380 


1945 




Miller Road 


from 


Glen Road 


638 


1945 




Moore Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to beyond 












Wedgewood Avenue 


1,528 


1967 




Morgan Road 


from 


Kilmarnock Street 


653 


1977 




Morningside Drive 


from 


Lexington Street to Fairfield Road 


693 


19 /4 




Morse Avenue 


from 


Woburn Street to beyond Lawn Street 


1,360 


J. y J y 




Mystic Avenue 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


1,298 


1 o r\ o 
19 Uo 


1 Q O O 

1988 


Nassau Avenue 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Dunton Road 


1,566 


1946 




Nathan Road 


from 


Senpek Road 


1,057 


1 ft 1 1 

1971 




Nichols Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


3,801 


1894 




Nickerson Avenue 


from 


West Street 


953 


194 / 




Norfolk Avenue 


from 


Carter Lane to Nassau Avenue 


537 


1 Q C >1 

19d4 




North Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Marcia Road 


3,515 


1945 




No. Washington 












Avenue 


from 


Agostino Drive 


858 


1979 




Nunn Road 


from 


Kelley Road 


214 


1965 




Oak Street 


from 


Salem Street 


355 


1951 




Oakdale Road 


from 


Short Street to Judith Road 


2,301 


1950 




Oakridge Circle 


from 


Gowing Road to Gowing Road 


1,730 


1958 




Oakwood Road 


from 


Main Street to beyond Emerson Street 


800 


1946 




Olson Street 


from 


Church Street 


122 


1957 




Oxbow Drive 


from 


Woburn Street 


1,751 


1994 





-45- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Palmer Way from 

Park Street from 

Parker Street from 

Patches Pond Lane from 

Patricia Circle from 

Pershing Street from 

Phillips Avenue from 

Pilcher Drive from 

Pilling Road from 

Pine Avenue from 

Pineridge Road from 

Pineview Road from 

Pinewood Road from 

Pleasant Road from 
Powder House 

Circle 
Presidential Dr. 
Progress Way 

Quail Run 

Radcliff Road from 

Railroad Avenue from 

Reading Avenue from 

Redwood Terrace from 

Reed Street from 

Research Drive from 

Richmond Street from 

Ridge Road from 

Ring Avenue from 

River Street from 

Roberts Road from 

Rollins Road from 

Roosevelt Road from 

Route 62 from 

Royal Street from 

Salem Street from 

Salem Street from 

Sarafina's Way from 

Scaltrito Drive from 

School Street from 

Senpek Road from 

Sewell Road from 

Shady Lane Drive from 

Shawsheen Avenue from 

Sherburn Place from 

Sheridan Road from 

Sherwood Road from 

Silver Lake Ave. from 

Sparhawk Drive from 

Sprucewood Road from 

State Street from 

Strout Avenue from 

Suncrest Avenue from 

Swain Road from 



Middlesex Avenue 1,437 1989 

Woburn Street to No. Reading Line 4,180 1895 

Lowell Street to Blackstone Street 2,000 1919 

Chestnut Street to a dead end 1,185 1990 

Dell Drive 595 1958 

Federal Street 720 1943 

Wild Ave. to beyond Baker Street 1,519 1946 

the end of Gearty Street 410 1989 

Hathaway Road 954 1959 

Main Street to Hobaon Avenue 380 1945 

North St. to Linda Road 914 1960 

Cobalt Street to Adelman Road 450 1953 

Shady Lane Drive to Oakdale Road 1,364 1954 

Middlesex Avenue to Linda Road 750 1962 



from Middlesex Avenue 710 1954 

from Boutwell Street 826 1977 

from Industrial Way 630 1974 

from Woburn Street 500 1992 



South Street to Benson Road 355 1971 

Clark Street 650 1909 

Oakwood Road 215 1979 

Kenwood Avenue 645 1970 

Shawsheen Ave. to beyond Harold Ave. 1,090 1971 

Ballardvale Street 1,817 1989 

Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 1,800 1973 

Suncrest Avenue 365 1956 

Salem Street to Biggar Avenue 1,150 1975 

Massachusetts Avenue to Harvard Ave. 453 1962 

Burlington Ave. to Burlington Ave. 1,861 1967 

Marion Street to Fenway Street 200 1954 

Boutwell Street to Swain Road 1,980 1946 

Middlesex Avenue to Salem Street 3,343 1958 

Salem Street 1,043 1951 

Tewksbury Line to beyond 
Ballardvale Street 
North Reading Line to beyond 

Woburn Street 6,475 1894 

Hopkins Street 450 1995 
southerly through cul-de-sac 

Salem Street 785 1974 

Middlesex Ave. to beyond Drury Lane 1,139 1915 

Wildwood Street to Nathan Road 280 1971 

Hathaway Road 300 1955 

Middlesex Ave. to Lawrence Street 2,904 1950 
beyond Richmond Street 

to Billerica Line 11,845 1894 

Shawsheen Avenue 723 1975 

Woburn Street to Hathaway Road 1,021 1951 

Forest Street to Cochrane Road 445 1971 

Lake Street to Dexter Street 455 1954 

Park Street to Heather Drive 361 1979 

Shady Lane Drive 690 1952 

Belmont Ave. to Fairview Ave. 315 1933 

Lowell Street 908 1955 

West Street to Ledgewood Road 1,246 1954 

Burlington Avenue to Forest Street 2,290 1922 



8,895 1894 



1954 1981 



1963 



1958 



1971 



1929 



-46- 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH 



DATE(S) ACCEPTED 



Taft Road from 

Taplin Avenue from 

Taplin Avenue from 

Temple Street from 

Thrush Road from 

Thurston Avenue from 

Tomahawk Drive from 

Towpath Drive from 

Towpath Drive from 

Towpath Drive from 

Tracy Circle from 

Truman Road from 



Boutwell Street to Swain Road 
Wisser Street 
Baker Street 
Church Street 

Salem Street to Marie Drive 

Church Street to beyond Kidder Place 

Aldrich Road 

Towpath Drive to a dead end 
Chestnut Street to Towpath Drive 
Towpath Drive 
Woburn Street 
Hathaway Road 



Unnamed Street 
Upton Court 

Valyn Lane 
Veranda Avenue 
Virginia Road 



from Salem Street to Andover Street 
from Andover Street 

from Salem Street 
from Main Street 

from No. Reading Line to No. Reading Line 



Walker Street from 

Warren Road from 

Washington Avenue from 

Webber Street from 

Wedgewood Avenue from 

West Street from 

Westdale Avenue from 

Wicks Circle from 

Wightman Road from 

Wild Avenue from 

Wildwood Street from 

Williouns Avenue from 

Wilson Street from 

Wilton Drive from 

Winchell Road from 

Wing Road from 

Wisser Street from 

Woburn Street from 

Woodland Road from 



Main Street 

Wightman Road to Tewksbury Line 
Clark Street to Stone Street 
Burlington Avenue 
Moore Street 

Woburn Street to Reading Line 
West Street 
Everett Avenue 

Warren Road to Tewksbury Line 
Grove Avenue 

Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 

Main Street 

Federal Street 

Shawsheen Avenue 

Grove Avenue to Burnap Street 

Woburn Street 

Main Street to Brand Avenue 
Andover Street to Woburn Line 
Lowell Street 



1 


,986 


1938 




461 


1946 




900 


1946 




214 


1911 




400 


1961 










575 


1989 




463 


1990 




914 


1990 




O l\J 


1 QQ 1 




675 


1992 




300 


1953 




470 


1958 




500 


1894 




608 


1989 




847 


1916 


1 


,105 


1954 




423 


1958 




97 


1954 


1 


,650 


1920 




677 


1969 




476 


1967 


8 


,372 


1894 


1 


,211 


1942 




533 


1971 




239 


1954 


1 


,050 


1910 


5 


,290 


1894 




706 


1940 




760 


1943 


1 


,151 


1966 




193 


1945 




746 


1958 


1 


,146 


1950 


23 


,122 


1894 


1 


,174 


1969 



1978 



1978 




Little League Field at Rotary Park. 



-47- 



Middlesex Canal Commission 



The Middlesex Canal Commission was created by the General Court, Chapter 403, 
Acts of 1977 at the request of the Middlesex Canal Association and is planning 
to reconvene for an important extension of its efforts to preserve the old 
canal . 

The Commission is composed of: 

One Senator (by President) 
One Representative (by Speaker) 
Executive Director, MAPC 
Executive Director, NMCG 

Commissioner of Environmental Management (or designee) 
Commissioner of Massachusetts Highway Department (or designee) 
Commissioner of Metropolitan District Commission (or designee) 
One member from each of nine communities along the Canal route, 

Boston, Somerville, Medford, Winchester, Woburn, Wilmington, 

Billerica, Chelmsford and Lowell 

The town's representatives on the Middlesex Canal Commission are: 

Betty M. Bigwood, 300 Chestnut Street, Wilmington, MA 
Austin Rounds (alternate), 52 Butters Row, Wilmington, MA 



Redevelopment Authority 



Early in 1995, the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority completed the 25% design 
engineering plans for the Route 38 Improvement project. 

At the close of the year, the Highway Department of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts held its local public hearing for the approval of the 25% plans. 

At the beginning of 1996, the Authority has completed the 75% design 
engineering plans for the project and has submitted these plans to the 
Massachusetts Highway Department for review and approval. 

In addition to current projects, the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority has 
provided the Town of Wilmington with continuing benefits from its investment 
in the Jewel Drive Industrial Park for the past 20+ years. At the end of 
1995, there were nine businesses operating in Jewel Park employing a total of 
945 workers. Based upon Fiscal Year 1995 data provided by the Assessor's 
Office, the total assessed value of the park was $13,712,800.00 and the annual 
tax revenue to the Town of Wilmington totalled $363,663.45. 

A reorganization of the Authority took place during the year. Sidney R. 
Kaizer retired from the Authority after serving over twenty years. Leo 
Campbell was elected to fill the vacant position. 

The Officers of the Authority are as follows: Dennis J. Volpe, Chairman; 
Charles Gilbert, Vice Chairman; Patricia F. Duggan, Treasurer; Leo Campbell, 
Assistant Treasurer and John H. Creeth, Secretary. 



Cable TV, Advisory Task Force 



with the current cable license due to expire on February 27, 1997, the Task 
Force has been engaged in gathering input from residents, school officials and 
municipal officials. This process, known as ascertainment, is intended to 
document Continental Cablevision ' s past performance and to define changes in 
the cable license which the town desires. 



-48- 



The Task Force conducted a survey at the 1995 Annual Town Meeting in April. 
Nearly 100 residents responded to the survey. Over 80% of respondents rated 
the quality of cable reception as good or excellent. Customer service 
representatives received a positive rating from 86% of the respondents. 
However, 49% of the survey participants felt that Continental Cablevision ' s 
variety of progremuning was fair to poor. Sixty percent of those surveyed 
indicated that as a value for their money the cable service was only fair to 
poor. More than 80% of respondents felt that the qpaality of local access 
programming (WCTV) was excellent to good. Continental Cablevision sponsored 
their own survey which gave them high marks in most areas. 

In September, a public hearing was held to obtain written and oral comment 
from residents and local officials concerning the cable service. While public 
participation at the hearing was very limited there was expression of concern 
over the cable rates in Wilmington compared with other communities and a 
desire to see more competition. In an effort to gain more specific 
information about the town's assessment of Continental's past performance and 
future needs relative to cable service, a second public hearing was scheduled 
for early 1996. 

Continental Cablevision reached a settlement with the Federal Communications 
Commission regarding numerous cable rate cases which were pending before the 
commission. The agreement known as the "Social Contract" obligates 
Continental to invest $1.35 billion into its domestic cable network between 
1995 and 2000. The investment will translate into an upgrade of many cable 
systems including the cable system in Wilmington. Residents can expect a 
greater number of channels to be offered when the upgrade is complete. 

Once ascertainment is complete the Task Force will begin the challenging task 
of negotiating the terms of a new license with Continental Cablevision. The 
license will contain a number of key provisions including the number of 
channels set aside for local programming, such as coverage of Selectmen and 
School Committee meetings, policy regarding service calls, issues related to 
customer service and equipment grants for WCTV. When a tentative agreement 
has been reached with Continental Cablevision regarding a new license, the 
document will be presented to the Board of Selectmen for their consideration. 



Board of Health 



The Board of Health consists of three members appointed by the Town Manager 
for three year terms. The Office of the Board of Health is located in the 
Town Hall in Room #5 and the Public Health Nurse's office is located off of 
the foyer of the Town Hall. Serving on the Board throughout 1995 were 
Chairman James Ficociello, D.D.S., One Fletcher Lane, Mr. Joseph Paglia, 101 
Nichols Street, Mr. Milton Calder, Sr., 14 Hobson Avenue. The Director of 
Public Health is Gregory Erickson, R.S., C.H.O., and the Public Health Nurse 
is Ann FitzGerald, R.N. The Animal Control Officer is Ellen Davis. The 
secretarial staff (which is shared with the Inspector of Buildings and Board 
of Appeals) consists of Joan Goulet, Toni LaRivee and Wendy Martiniello (part 
time). Karen Springer, C.E.H.T., Rosemary Gangi-Marcelais, R.S., and Shelly 
Williams, C.E.H.T. were contracted as needed to conduct a portion of the field 
inspections on a part-time basis. 

Field inspections include restaurants, retail food stores, cafeterias in 
industrial buildings and in the schools, mobile food trucks, ice cream trucks, 
the Fourth of July activities, caterers, the Farm Stand at the Aleppo Temple 
and other temporary food stands such as at athletic events, percolation tests, 
soil evaluations, subsurface sewage disposal inspections, nuisance complaints, 
hazardous waste spills, leaking underground storage tanks, housing 
inspections, lead paint determinations and inspections, smoking and tobacco 
law enforcement, lake water quality sampling and other miscellaneous 
inspections . 



-49- 



The administrative duties 
of the office include the 
licensing and the 
enforcement of many of 
the above items, 
including issuing 
permits, enforcement 
orders, issuing 
citations, holding 
hearings, attending 
meetings and court 
actions. Other 
administrative duties 
include the creation of 
health or risk prevention 
progrcuns and distributing 
information on various 
health issues. 

The Board of Health has 
been awarded a grant of 
$22,064 (pending approval 
by the Legislature) by 
the Massachusetts 
Department of Public 
Health for the 
continuation of the 
Tobacco Control Program. 
This program employs a 
part-time Director and 
clerk and has as its goal the 
Wilmington by 50% by the year 

Our radon detection and survey program continues to provide low cost radon 
kits for the public as a result of an ongoing two year contract with NITON of 
Bedford, wherein residents of the Town of Wilmington have been able to 
purchase radon detection test kits (2 tests per kit) for $16.00 at the office 
of the Board of Health and receive important information for the reduction of 
radon and the associated risk of lung cancer. 

A rabies clinic for dogs and cats was held during Rabies Awareness Week in May 
at the 4th of July Building on Middlesex Avenue. 

The Director served in an advisory capacity on the Title 5 Advisory Committee 
and co-chaired the Technical Review Committee for the Department of 
Environmental Protection. He was instrumental in preventing some sweeping 
changes which would have been very costly to homeowners in the Town of 
Wilmington and promoted a common-sense approach to sewage disposal upgrades as 
part of the implementation of the new Title 5 Regulations which become 
effective March 31, 1995 and were again amended on August 2, 1995. The 
Director was also the recipient of the Massachusetts Health Officers 
Association's "President's Award" for 1995, primarily for leadership work in 
the area of Title 5. 

The Public Health Nurse participated in four health fairs. Business Expo 95, 
as well as 5 Senior Health Day events, skin and prostate screenings sponsored 
by Winchester Hospital. In addition, an Osteoporosis Awareness workshop was 
co-sponsored by Salem Prevention Center, Wilmington Board of Health and held 
at the Senior Center. 

The joint pediatric program for Wilmington's uninsured children is still 
available through Wilmington Pediatrics and the Board of Health which provides 
free pediatric immunizations. Influenza and pneumonia clinics were held as 
well. The Medicare-B, Massachusetts Immunization Progreun reimbursed the town 
the sum of $1,534.06 for the administering of flu vaccine to eligible senior 
citizens. Mantoux skin tests for T.B., M.M.R. and T.D. clincs were held at 
the Wilmington Public Schools. 




Beach at Silver Lake. 



reduction of tobacco use in the Town of 
1999. 



-50- 

i 



The Public Health nurse continues to participate in the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health Community Health Network Area (CHNA) #15. The 
group of hospitals, Boards of Health, agencies and providers in the region 
have a common goal of raising public awareness concerning the severity and the 
impact of domestic violence on residents in each of 18 cities and towns 
involved in the Network. The nurse has attended progr2un8 for professional 
development on low vision, updated immunization and T.B. practices, a 
Hepatitis Workshop, and continues to serve as a member of the Community Round 
Table at the Wilmington Family Medical Center and for the Resource Center due 
to open in 1996. 

A. Communicable Disease Control; 



1. Immunizations administered 130 
Office-Flu vaccinations administered 191 
Home-Flu vaccinations administered 49 
Clinic-Flu vaccinations administered 951 
Pneumovax administered 123 
Hepatitis B vaccinations administered 11 
Fees Collected (Medicare B) $932.48 
Flu distributed 540 

2. Communicable Diseases Reported 72 
Home Visits 5 

3. Tuberculosis Cases 6 
Office Visits 110 
Home Visits 

B. Public Health Nursing ; 

1. Premature births/Newborn Report 

2. Morbidity-V.N.A. Calls/Office Visits 8 

3. General Health Supervision/Home Visits 111 
Office Visits (injections, weights) 158 
Telephone/Health Conference Call 143 

4. Hypertension Screening-Office Visits 617 

5. Diabetic Screening-Office Visits 33 
Fees Collected $33.00 

6. Other Screenings 

Breast Self-Examinations 

Blood Pressure 186 

Mantoux 41 

7. Senior Counseling/Drop-In Center 

Number of Sessions 48 

Hypertension Screening 769 

Diabetic Screening 39 

General Health (injections) 3 

Deming Way - Hypertension Screening 41 
Fees Collected $39.00 

8. Blood Lead Testing 4 

9. Blood Analyzer Testing Clients 84 
Total number of tests 108 
Fees Collected $390.00 

10. Meetings 68 

11. Vaccine Distribution 71 

12. TOTAL FEES COLLECTED $1,394.48 



-51- 



C. Environmental Health; 



1. Transport /Haulers $4,000.00 
Stables 600.00 
Miscellaneous permits 2,848.66 
Percolation testing 11,100.00 
Sewage system permits 19,100.00 
Food establishment permits 7,945.00 
Installers permits 2,400.00 
Sub-Divisions reviews 1,300.00 
Massage Therapy/Funeral Directors 650.00 
Copies 72.00 
Court witness fees 9.00 

TOTAL FEES COLLECTED $50,024.66 

2. Meetings Attended 98 

3. Disposal Works Construction Inspections 255 

4. No. of Septic Plans Reviewed/NEW 81 

5. No. of Septic Plans Reviewed/REPAIRS 95 

6. Food Establishment Inspections 

Food Service Inspection 15 

Retail Food 37 

Residential Kitchen 1 

Mobile Food 15 

7. Food Establishment Re-Inspections 

Food Service 38 

Retail Food 10 

Residential Kitchen 

Mobile Food 

8. Nuisance Complaint Inspections 34 

9. Nuisance Complaint Re-Inspections 23 

10. Housing Inspections 10 

11. Housing Re-Inspections 12 

12. Percolation Tests 225 

13. Court Appearances 11 

14. Hazardous Waste Investigations 4 

15. Ceunp Inspections 2 

16. Miscellaneous Inspections 78 

17. Lead Inspections 4 

18. Tobacco Control Program Inspections 79 

19. Title 5 Inspection Reports Received 151 



-52- 



Mental Health Outpatient Services 



The Wilmington Feunily Counseling Service, Inc., as a non-profit agency founded 
in 1967, has a contract with the town to provide services to Wilmington 
residents. The agency is committed to providing mental health services at a 
reasonable cost to the clients and at a time convenient to their work and 
school schedules. Client fees range from $10 to $62 depending upon income. 

1995 Services to Wilaington Residents 



300 Wilmington families received service 

3,262 Scheduled therapy sessions 

245 Groups including Early Sobriety Group, Empowerment 

Group for Abused Women, Relationship Group, Group for 
Adults from Dysfunctional families, Adopt-A- 
Grandmother Groups for Adolescents 

$62,321 Subsidized care to Wilmington residents 

23% Subsidized by Town of Wilmington 

46% Subsidized by United Way of Merrimack Valley 

31% No Subsidy 

165 Wilmington feunilies received subsidized care 

55% of Wilmington clients 

Presenting Problems; 

44% Adults with emotional problems 

18% Adolescent adjustment problems 

15% Child management problems 

15% Marital problems 

8% Substance abuse 

94% of clients returning the Annual Questionnaire endorsed 

the agency as "helpful" 

84% indicated that their life had improved since beginning 

counseling 



Housing Authority 



The Wilmington Housing Authority, organized in 1951, operates under the 
provisions of Chapter 121B of Massachusetts General Laws, Section VIII, 24CFR 
(Code of Federal Regulations); Chapter SOB of the State Procurement Law, and 
State and Federal Code of Ethics. All state and federal programs are audited 
on an annual basis. A five-member Board of Commissioners, consisting of four 
elected and one state appointed member, oversees the Authority's policies and 
procedures. The Executive Director is charged with the administration of 
these procedures. 



The Authority, originally consisting of 40 units of housing, is now providing 
affordable housing for 72 seniors and 13 (705) families and includes 
conventional housing owned by the Authority. As always, the Authority gives 
first preference for housing to Wilmington residents. The Authority also 
services the Federal Section 8 Certificate and Voucher Programs. 

The state leased housing program has been severely curtailed and the Authority 
is seeking other ways in which it can provide housing for both senior citizens 
and feunilies. Currently, all programs are leased at 100%. 

The senior citizen population of 80 years of age and over is the fastest 
growing population today, and this poses a problem in providing enough housing 
for those seniors in failing health who cannot live totally independently but 
who should not be placed in a nursing home. The Wilmington Housing 
Authority's tenants, in conjunction with Minuteman Home Care, receive home 
care and other social services in an effort to assist them to live 
independently. However, more is needed and another program currently being 
pursued by the Authority is housing for frail elders, which would provide 
housing, meals, medical care and other services, while allowing seniors to 
maintain private quarters. 

There were numerous vacancies in 1995 for the Senior Housing Development. 
However, in the low income properties there were four vacancies of which many 
required major renovations. Also, two of the units had modifications so they 
would meet the A.D.A. requirements for the tenants who were to reside there. 
We were also fortunate enough to receive a grant from E.O.C.D. for an 
elevator. The elevator will be constructed in 1996 for our seniors at Deming 
Way Extension. Along with this being done, we will also be replacing all 
roofs at Deming Way for which we also received grant funding. 

The Share Program was instituted in 1993 and since that time has doubled in 
size. A great deal of thanks to Dot Butler, Grace Rosa and Anna Stanley, the 
organizers of this program and to the many seniors and other community 
activists that make this program work. 

The Wilmington Housing Authority and its Board of Commissioners would like to 
express our appreciation to the Wilmington Fire Department and Police 
Department for responding promptly in the many life threatening situations 
that we unfortunately have. Also to Michael Caira, Town Manager, and all the 
town employees who bring a better quality of living to our tenants. 

BOARD MEMBERS EXPIRATION OF TERM 



Charles Fiore, Jr. - Chairman April 1998 

Lillian Hupper - Vice Chairman/State Appointee March 1998 

Dorothy A. Butler - Treasurer April 1998 

Melvin Keough - Vice Treasurer April 1996 

Alfred N. Meegan, Jr. - Secretary April 1997 



-54- 



Town Counsel 



On January 1, 1995, there were pending the following actions by or against the 
town (exclusive of actions in which the town was merely summoned as trustee, 
and in which it had no interest, and of tax lien foreclosure proceedings in 
the Land Court and petitions for abatement before the Appellate Tax Board*). 

Frances Dec v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Massachusetts Commission Against 
Discrimination #77-BEM 0731, 0732 (complaint alleging sex discrimination) 
(settlement discussions ongoing) 

Fosters Pond Improvement Association, Inc. et al v. Aldo Caira. et al . 
Middlesex Superior Court #78-4771 (action in the nature of certiorari for 
decision of Board of Selectmen granting earth removal permit) 

Town of Wilmington v. Robert Corey, aka. et al . Middlesex Superior Court 
(complaint alleging violation of Town Zoning By-Law and Inland Wetland Act) 

Dianna Holmes, et al v. Town of Wilmington , Suffolk Superior Court #54601 
(complaint for discrimination in violation of Chapter 151B) 

Ruth E. Marranzini, et al v. Bruce MacDonald, et al . Middlesex Superior Court 
(appeal from the decision of the Board of Appeals) 

William Baldwin, p.p. a. et al v. Town of Wilmington . Middlesex Superior Court 
#85-676 (claim for personal injury) 

Ralph Fiore Bus Service, Inc. v. Town of Wilmington, et al , Middlesex Superior 
Court #85-3048 (complaint under Mass. Antitrust Act, G. L. Ch. 93) 

Joyce Corey v. Town of Wilmington, et al , Middlesex Superior Court #86-146W 
(claim for violation of civil rights and injunctive relief) 

James Bruce, Administrator, et al v. Clifford A. Singelais, et al , Middlesex 
Superior Court #87-0838 (third party tort action for claim of negligence) 

Michelle A. Carbone, ppa, et al v. William Clifford, Administrator of the 
Estate of Mary E. Clifford, v. Town of Wilmington, et al , Middlesex Superior 
Court (action for wrongful death pursuant to G. L. Ch. 229, S. 2 and third 
party claim G. L. Ch. 231B) 

Robert McSweenev v. Bruce MacDonald, et al , Middlesex Superior Court #87-3541 
(action for appeal of a decision of the Board of Appeals and claims under the 
Massachusetts Constitution and Title 42, section 1983, U.S.C.) 

Charles Sullivan v. Bruce MacDonald, et al . Land Court (transferred from 
Middlesex Superior Court) 

Max Johnson v. Bruce MacDonald. et al . Land Court (transferred from Middlesex 
Superior Court) 

Richard Stuart, Trustee, et al v. Board of Appeals of the Town of Wilmington , 
Land Court #42097 (appeal of decisions of Board of Appeals denying 
reconsideration of a prior decision, denial of variances and denial of 
applications concerning Official Map {Ch. 41, S. 81E}) 

Taiena Corporation, d/b/a J's Food & Deli v. Gregory Erickson, et al , 
Middlesex Superior Court #90-1330 (complaint for civil rights violation and 
declaratory judgment concerning use of premises and for certiorari) (partial 
judgment for the defendants on Counts 4 and 5) (Appeals Court Docket No. 
94P330) ( settlement discussions ongoing) 

Bruce MacDonald, et al v. Wilmington Arboretum Apts., et al , Middlesex 
Superior Court #90-4989 (appeal from decision of Housing Appeals Committee 
granting comprehensive permit /decision of Housing Court affirmed) Appeals 
Court #92P757 (appeal from decision of Middlesex Superior Court) 



Scott C. Reinold v. Town of Wilmington, et al , Middlesex Superior Court 
#91-4078 (tort complaint for damages alleging to tortious acts by the 
Wilmington Police Department) 

Priscilla Collins. Administratrix De Bonis Non of the Estate of Joseph James 
Roy V, Town of Wilmington . Middlesex Superior Court, #92-4695 (action for 
personal injury) 

USTrust V. American Traveller. Inc.. et al . Middlesex Superior Court #92-5307 
(equity action to reach and apply funds claimed by the defendant, William Fay) 

Joseph ?♦ McMenimen. et al v. Wilmington Arboretum Apts.. et al . Middlesex 
Superior Court #92-6822 (appeal from further decision of Housing Appeals 
Committee) 

Town of Wilmington, et al v. Frances Dec, et al . Middlesex Superior Court 
#90-81861 (appeal from a decision of MCAD) ( settlement discussions ongoing) 

Mildred F» Woods, et al v. Town of Wilmington . Land Court (petition to 
determine zoning relevancy) 

Residential Development Corporation, et al v» Wilmington Planning Board . Land 
Court (appeal of a decision of the Planning Board pursuant to G. L. Ch. 41, 
S. 81BB) 

Ruth Tkachuk. et al v. Wilmington Board of Appeals, et al . Middlesex Superior 
Court #195418 CDJ, ZJA, ZBJ, (action for zoning relief) 

Keith R» McConnell et al v. Board of Appeals, et al . Middlesex Superior Court 
#MICV93-06539F (appeal from a decision of the Board of Appeals granting a 
variance) 

Robert P. Magliozzi. et al v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Middlesex Superior 
Court #93-7141, (appeal from a decision of the Board of Appeals granting a 
variance) 

Mary Nelson v. Louis Farkas, et al . Middlesex Superior Court #94-2516 
(complaint for judicial review of zoning decision) 

Joanne M. Cuoco. et al v. Gregory Erickson. et al . Woburn District Court 
#945cvl090 (appeal from decision of Board of Health) 

Velma Emery v. Richard A. Longo. et al . Middlesex Superior Court #94-5527 
(Appeal from the decision of the Planning Board) 

Joseph A. Langone. Trustee v. Town of Wilmington . Land Court #37162-S-1994-09 
(petition to eliminate "paper streets") 

James J. Piro. et al v. Donald F. Sughrue. et al . Middlesex Superior Court 
#94-6399 (appeal from the decision of the Board of Appeals) 

******************************** 

During the year 1995, the following new actions were brought against the Town 
of Wilmington or its officers or agents: 

Town of Reading Municipal Light Department v. Town of Wilmington, et al . 
Middlesex Superior Court #95-0534 (action to compel the town to implement 
electric light liens on town residents) 

Wilmington Fire Fighters. I.A.F.F.. Local 1370 (Richard Fuller) v. Town of 
Wilmington . Labor Relations Commission (charge of prohibited practice pursuant 
to G. L. Ch. 150E) 

Wilmington Fire Fighters. I.A.F.F.. Local 1370 (Richard Fuller) v. Town of 
Wilmington . American Arbitration Association #11-390-00755-95 (claim for 
benefits) 



-56- 



George A. Anderson, Jr. Town of Wilmington . Middlesex Superior Court 
#95-2288 (action for reinstatement of employee as fire fighter) 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts D.E.T. v. Town of Wilmington (William Fay) 
Boston Municipal Court #9501CV-228050 (action for unpaid employment security 
taxes) 

New England Landevelopment . Inc. v. Board of Appeals . Land Court #219125 
(action pursuant to G. L. Ch. 40A, S. 17 for judicial review of a Board of 
Appeals' decision) 

New England Landevelopment. Inc. v. Board of Appeals . Land Court #219126 
(action pursuant to G. L. Ch. 40A, S. 17 for judicial review of a Board of 
Appeals' decision) 

Ross F. Spinelli. Jr., et al v. Michael Bozzolla. et al . Land Court #219624 
(petition for declaratory judgment re Official Map) 

Willicun E. Leatham, III, et ux v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Middlesex 
Superior Court #95-4539 (complaint in ten counts alleging negligence and other 
matters contained in the complaint) 

Clifford Preble v. Town of Wilmington , American Arbitration Association #11 
390 02450 95 (claim for holiday pay) 

Jarrett Amicone v. Town of Wilmington, et al , Middlesex Superior Court 
#95-5760 (complaint for alleged violation of state and federal civil rights 
and assault and battery and ancillary damages) 

AFSCME Council 93, AFL-CIO and Town of Wilmington . American Arbitration 
Association #11 390 02527 95 (class action grievance and claim for grievance) 

Michael's Place. Inc. v. Board of Selectmen . Hearing at Alcoholic Beverage 
Control Commission (appeal to Alcoholic Beverage Control Commission from 
denial of application of a liquor license) 

******************************* 

During the year 1995, the following new actions were brought by or on behalf 
of the town: 

Town of Wilmington v. J. Tropeano, Inc.. et al . Middlesex Superior Court #95 
53CV0829 (action against general contractor and suit on the bond) 

State Ethics Commission v. Arthur R. Smith. Jr. . State Ethics Commission No. 
522 (hearing on alleged violation of ethics violation) 

State Ethics Commission v. James Russo , State Ethics Commission No. 523 
(hearing on alleged violation of ethics violation) 

******************************* 

There are pending as of January 1, 1996, separate petitions for abatements 
before the Appellate Tax Board, many involving claims for several different 
years. 

******************************* 



During the year 1995, the following actions by or against the town were 
disposed of: 

Frances Dec v. Town of Wilmington, et al . Massachusetts Commission Against 
Discrimination #77-BEM 0731, 0732 (disposed of by stipulation of dismissal and 
payment of $88,000.00 to Frances Dec) 

Town of Wilmington, et al v. Frances Dec, et al , Middlesex Superior Court 
#90-81861 (disposed of by stipulation of dismissal) 



-57- 



Taiena Corporation d/b/a J' 8 Food & Deli v. Gregory Erickson, et al . Middlesex 
Superior Court #90-1330 (disposed of by compromise in the amount of the town's 
retention, $10,000.00, at the request of the insurer and payment to the town 
of Wilmington in the amount of $24,566.71 being the eunount of legal defense 
and final decision of the Appeals Court affirming judgment of the Middlesex 
Superior Court) 

Joseph A. Lanqone, Trustee v. Town of Wilmington , Land Court #37162-S-1994-09 
(Disposed of by judgment declaring Sunset Road, Claremont Street, Naples Road, 
Dana Street and Bond Street to be discontinued and declaring that Joseph A. 
Langone, Trustee of the Flaremont Realty Trust is the owner in fee simple of 
the land comprising the streets) 

Keith R. McConnell et al v. Board of Appeals, et al . Middlesex Superior Court 
#MICV93-06539F (disposed of by voluntary agreement of dismissal) 

Wilmington Fire Fighters. I.A.F.F.. Local 1370 (Richard Fuller) v. Town of 
Wilmington , American Arbitration Association #11-390-00755-95 (the Arbitrator 
decided that the grievance is not procedurally arbitrable. The grievance is 
denied) 

Wilmington Fire Fighters. I.A.F.F., Local 1370 (Richard Fuller) v. Town of 
Wilmington , Labor Relations Commission (Union voluntarily withdrew charge) 

Bruce MacDonald. et al v. Wilmington Arboretum Apts.. et al . Middlesex 
Superior Court #90-4989 (Appeals Court #92P757 ) (disposed of by decision of 
Appeals Court affirming the decision of the Superior Court ordering the Zoning 
Board of Appeals to grant a comprehensive permit for the construction of 
residential rental units consistent with the Decision of the Housing Appeals 
Committee ) 

USTrust V. American Traveller. Inc., et al . Middlesex Superior Court #92-5307 
(disposed of by settlement for agreement in the amount of $12,000.00) 

Ross F. Spinelli. Jr.. et al v. Michael Bozzella. et al . Land Court #219624 
(disposed of by judgment discontinuing Jaquith Road as a paper street in the 
Town of Wilmington) 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts D.E.T. v. Town of Wilmington (William Fay) 
Boston Municipal Court #9501CV-228050 (disposed of by affirmation of the 
preliminary decision and Wilmington School Department to pay $2,983.27 and 
release of real estate lien) 



-58- 



Historical Commission 




Members of the Historical Commission and Park Service Rangers 
take part in a hands-on exhibit following the Veterans' Day 
Parade. 



As 1995 marked the 
commemoration of the 50th 
anniversary of the end of 
World War II, the members of 
the Wilmington Historical 
Commission marched in the 
town's Veterans Day Parade. 
They also displayed photos 
on the Town Common of how 
Wilmington appeared during 
the 1940 's and 1950 's. 
Through the Commission's 
efforts, the National Park 
Service was contacted and 
agreed to participate in 
this commemoration. Four 
Park Service Rangers from 
the Boston National 
Historical Park marched in 
the parade. The rangers 
then provided a hands-on 
exhibit of the role of the 
Charlestown Navy Yard during 
World War II. Two of the 
rangers added to the 
festivities by being dressed 
as "Rosie the Riveter." 



The Historical Commission participated in the Wilmington Chamber of Commerce's 
"Expo 1995" by providing a multi-media exhibit. This exhibit included a 
pictorial display of the early days of Wilmington's commercial development, 
historical memorabilia and a video presentation. For this Expo, the 
Commission coordinated displays by the Friends of the Harnden Tavern, the 
Middlesex Canal Commission, and the Wilmington Company of Minutemen. 

In cooperation with local industry, the Historical Commission worked with 
AMETEK Corporation in celebration of the company's silver anniversary of its 
Wilmington division. The Commission organized a pictorial and video display 
of historic Wilmington. At the Commission's invitation, the Wilmington 
Company of Minutemen joined the festivities. 

The Wilmington Historical Commission continues to support owners of historic 
homes in town who are pursuing registration of their property on the National 
Register of Historic Places. 

Our ongoing concern is to protect the old West Schoolhouse. In this effort, 
the Commission continued to research ways by which funds to restore this 
historic landmark could be obtained. 

The Colonial Joshua Harnden Tavern is open for free tours on the first Sunday 
of each month from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. The Commission also welcomes 
private tours by appointment. The Commission continues to encourage school 
groups to tour the Tavern and to appreciate Wilmington's rich heritage. As in 
past years, the Commission hosted many students and civic groups on tours of 
the Tavern. 

The Friends of the Harnden Tavern held their Annual Christmas Social at the 
Tavern. Those who attended spent a delightful afternoon in the festively 
decorated Tavern. 

Membership in the National Trust for Historic Preservation and Historic 
Massachusetts has been renewed. 



-59- 







Part o///2e Historical Commission's Exhibit on the Town Common included photographs of men and 
women who served in the armed forces during World War II. 

The Historical Cominission is thankful to the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, 
Public Works and Public Buildings Departments for their support and hard work. 
The Commission is also thankful for the positive response of the community 
towards the Commission's participation in the above events. 

The Commission meets on the second Monday of the month in Room 4 of the Town 
Hall. 



Carter Lecture Fund 



Sarah D. J. Carter, a prominent Wilmington citizen, left the town a bequest in 
1910 for the purpose of presenting interesting and entertaining progrfuns for 
the enjoyment of the community. Each spring the committee offers such an 
evening with a variety of types. 

On April 27, 1995, a band of five musicians called "Way Station" performed at 
the Barrows Auditorium in the High School. This group blends folk music and 
bluegrass on their various instruments. The banjo player. Rich Stillman, is a 
Wilmington resident who has joined Peter Anick on the fiddle and guitar; Karen 
Lincoln, guitarist; Ed Kingsley, the mandolin and Dimitri Eleftherakis on 
bass. They wrote much of the music and were well received by the audience. 



Public Buildings Department 



The Public Buildings Department is responsible for the maintenance of all town 
and school buildings. We are responsible for the cleaning and sanitary 
conditions for town employees, school children and personnel and the general 
public. 

The following are the highlights of some of the projects completed during 
1995. 



-60- 



Automatic door openers were installed at the Town Hall in the toilet 
facilities for easy access by the handicapped. 

Renovation was done at the Town Hall in Room 1 for the Treasurer/Col lector ' s 
office to provide additional space. 

The Boutwell School was given a face lift with the cleaning, painting of the 
inside and out and the replacement of the windows for a successful reopening 
in September. 

Handicapped accessible water fountains were installed in the West Intermediate 
School and the Town Hall. 



During the summer, all 
schools were prepared for a 
successful opening in 
September. 

Voting machines were 
programmed and set up for 
all elections. 

New roofs were installed on 
two sections of the 
Wilmington Library. 

Renovation of the Police 
dispatch area was completed 
for the installation of the 
E 9-1-1 phone system. 




A diesel exhaust system was 
installed at the Fire 

Department for all fire i . "^'r' 

apparatus . 

•KinilWiMliniiiili ■ilMiffiiillMtfriii^^ 

I gratefully acknowledge the 

support of the Board of Public Buildings employee Stephen Berghaus paints the Shawsheen 

Selectmen, Town Manager, School. 
Town Departments, School 
Administration and 

especially all the employees of the Public Buildings Department for their 
continued help, support and cooperation in making 1995 a productive year. 



Recreation Department 



The Wilmington Recreation Department, in its 25th year with a full-time 
Director, continued to meet new challenges while delivering a comprehensive 
slate of leisure opportunities for the citizens of Wilmington. 

Although the Recreation Department remains a small department, with only two 
full-time employees, it represents the second largest industry in the nation. 
In fact, Americans spend about 12 percent of their personal income on 
recreation. 

The Recreation Commission consists of five volunteer citizens appointed by the 
Town Manager. This board functions in a policy making and advisory capacity 
to the Director. Board members are active in many local organizations 
assuring continued contact and communication with the Recreation Department. 



-61- 



The Recreation Commission and Director are guided by the following 
departmental objectives as they plan and conduct recreation programs 
throughout the yeart 



* provide opportunities for self-expression 

* develop a sense of personal worth 

* provide activities that allow for personal 
achievement and accomplishment 

* provide activities that are fun and enjoyable 

provide physical activities which are new and different, 
offering a certain amount of challenge to participants 

* teach skills in various activities that will have carryover 
value in later life 

* provide a healthy and diversified program of recreation 
activities in an attempt to meet the needs and interests of the 
people being served 

A townwide recreation survey taken two years ago offered us these valuable 
insights and guidelines: a) family satisfaction with recreation was moderate, 
b) respondents placed recreation as a high priority public service, c) our 
dependence upon user fees with tax support is the desired way of financing the 
department, d) most respondents participate in a recreation program, e) age 
groups, in order, needing more recreation are junior high age, middle age then 
pre-school. 

Our total funding comes from a variety 
of sources. The town budget provides 
for a full-time director and clerk, a 
summer special needs day camp and some 
supplies. Program fees and donations 
supplement the town funded budget. We 
are pleased with our continued ability 
to offer high quality programs at very 
reasonable costs. We are able to do 
this because we utilize fund-raising 
methods which are services too. These 
services are: various trips and 
programs. Town Hall Pepsi machine, sale 
of Wilmington sweatshirts and t-shirts, 
sale of Entertainment Books, sale of 
Town Cards, sale of Ski Books and canoe 
rental. Further, on a positive note, we 
are seeing unsolicited donations from 
families and businesses. Shawsheen Tech 
sometimes helps us with printing and 
provided us with a donated computer. We 
will continue to search for new and 
innovative ways to generate needed funds 
and equipment in order to keep costs low 
for the consumer. Volunteers, as 
always, play a key role in providing two 
dollars worth of service for every 
dollar spent. We utilize volunteers in 
varying capacities in many of our 
progreuns. They provide a valuable 
service and gain much themselves in this 
capacity. We also receive much help 
from local clubs and organizations. 
Some of these invaluable contributors 
are: Lions Club, Kiwanis, Chamber of Basketball game at the Town Hall summer playground. 
Commerce, Wilmington Town Employees 
Association, Tewksbury/Wilmington Elks, 
Police Association, Custodial Union, 

Dunkin Donuts, Analog Devices, Stelio's Restaurant, F & R Auto Supply, 
McDonald's, Burger King, Sweetheart Cup, Dandi-Lyons, Auxiliary Police, Camp 
Forty Acres, Pepsi Cola, Tootsie's Kitchen, DeMoulas, Textron, MASSBANK for 
Savings, Shriners, Agfa and Ski Haus. 




-62- 



The Recreation Department is always involved, in varying degrees, with many 
recreation oriented groups. In this capacity we serve as a quasi-consulting 
agency. We also loan recreation equipment to families and groups of all types 
for various functions. We program use of the Shawsheen Tech pool for scouts 
and other groups. We also use this pool for our summer swim lessons program. 
We are a diverse information source and referral agency answering a wide 
variety of questions every day. 




T-Ball at Rotary Park. 



Our basic programs are: Santa's 
Workshop, Horribles Parade, Elks 
Christmas Party for Special Kids, 
Christmas Shopping Trip to New York 
City, Spring Trip to New York City, 
Basketball League, Adult Gym, Swimming 
Lessons, CPR, First Aid, Gymnastics, 
Aerobics, Cinema Discounts, Discounts to 
Other Commercial Recreation Enterprises, 
Discount Coupons, Disney on Ice at 
Boston Garden, Special Needs Programs, 
Florida Discounts, T-Ball, Easter Egg 
Hunt, Circus Tickets at Boston Garden, 
Bruins Tickets, Summer Playground, Tiny 
Tots, Special Needs Day Camp, Public 
Beach Lifeguard Supervision, Canoe 
Rental and Clinic, Cranes Beach Sand 
Castle Day, Horseback Riding Lessons, 
Tennis Lessons, Concerts on the Common, 
Red Sox Trips, Fishing Derby, Co-Ed 
Volleyball, free loan of Fishing, 
Canoeing, Disney, Soccer, Aerobics, 
Hawaii and other VCR Tapes, Police 

Association Beach Day, Easter Coloring Contest, sale of Entertainment Discount 
Books, Special Needs Trips to the Shriners Rodeo and Circus, Ballroom and 
Country Western Dancing Lessons, Atlantic City Trips, Kinder Karate, Junior 
Basketball, Topsfield Fair Tickets, Rafting, Big "E" Tickets, sale of Ski 
Discount Books, Summer Youth Basketball League and Clinics, Connecticut Casino 
Trips, Golf Lessons, Letters from Santa, Las Vegas Trips, Nantucket Trip, 

Martha's Vineyard Trip, 
Town Park Softball 
Leagues, Roller Skating 
Trips for Intermediate 
Schools, Overnight Trip 
to New York City with 
Rockettes Christmas Show, 
sale of Tickets to Water 
Country, sale of Town 
Cards, Co-Sponsorship of 
K of C Shootout, Baby 
Sitting Course, Kids 
Craft Classes, Adult 
Craft Classes, Jr. 
Bowling League, Flower 
Show Tickets, New 
Heunpshire Fall Foliage 
Trip, Fryeburg Fair Trip, 
Montreal Trip, Bermuda 
Cruise, Myrtle Beach 
Trip, Olympic Figure 
Skating Show, Les 
Miserables Trip to 
Boston, Penn Dutch Trip, 
Trips to Boston Pops, 
Jesus Christ Superstar, Christmas Carol and Old Deerfield. 




Members of a Recreation Department Crafts Class work on 
Scarecrows for Halloween. 



-63- 



We try to remain versatile, not stereotyped. Due to change in demand and 
other factors, we change our offerings to the tune of 10-20% each year. We 
are seeing an increase in the number of participants in many of our progrzuns 
especially youth programs. Our trips for adults and families provide much 
needed revenue. These trips are in great demand. We took over 80 people to 
Bermuda in the spring and plan to return next spring. We've expanded our 
offerings to intermediate students. Arts and crafts programs for children and 
adults have expanded too. 

Some of the other groups that offer leisure type programs in Wilmington are: 
Little League, Elderly Services Department, Youth Hockey, Pop Warner, Figure 
Skating Club, Square Dancing, Youth Soccer, Tennis Club, July 4th Committee, 
Community Schools, Council for the Arts, Scouts, Campfire and the Skating 
Rink. Schools and churches round out the active recreation picture. The 
emergence of the Youth Center at St. Thomas, which will open in early 1996, 
will help expand recreation in town. 

The lack of commercial recreation in Wilmington, such as bowling centers and 
movie theaters and the lack of agencies such as YMCA's and Boys/Girls Clubs 
stresses the importance for town support of this Department, especially now 
with a growing youth population and a growing demand for recreation 
opportunities . 




-64- 



Veterans Services 



Veterans Services is 
governed by the General Laws 
of Massachusetts, Chapter 
115, as amended, with strict 
compliances to this chapter, 
the rules and policies 
govern the disbursement of 
aid. 

Benefits are for the needy 
veteran and his immediate 
family who have been subject 
to unforeseen needs. Final 
approval of benefits come 
from the Commissioner of 
Veterans Services, Boston, 
MA. 

Total expended for aid to 
veterans and their families 
for the entire year was 
$14,667.00. The balance of 
the first six months of 1995 
from previous appropriations 
was $7,441.50. Total 
available funds beginning in 
July 1, 1995 was $10,000.00. 

The amount of additional 
benefits expended by the 
Veterans Administration 
directly to the veteran 
population in Wilmington was 
$1,369,177 for benefits for 
the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1995, representing the 
amount of tax dollars not 
required to be expended for 
those who, because of 
circumstances, find it 
necessary to apply for aid. 




On the occasion of the 50th Anniversary of the end of World War II 
and in memory of those who made the ultimate sacrifice, the flag is 
lowered to half-staff during Veterans' Day ceremonies. 



The appropriation for the 
last six months of 1995 and 
six months of 1996 was 

$10,000 as voted at the Annual Town Meeting, with balance for first six months 
of 1995. 




Veterans and family members decorate the memorial at Eaton Square during Memorial Day weekend. 



-65- 



Library 



In accordance with the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington, the Memorial 
Library's annual report for 1995, with accompanying statistics, is herewith 
submitted. 

"A public library is essential to the preservation of democracy and is as 
vital a service to its citizens as any provided by the town. The mission of 
the Wilmington Memorial Library is to ensure that all the people of Wilmington 
have free and open access to information and ideas." Thus begins the 
library's newly articulated mission statement which shapes the collections and 
services of. the library and its plans for the future. 

During 1995 the library's highly dedicated staff provided the skilled and 
friendly service for which it is recognized and kept up with the changing 
needs of a growing population. New services, including new programs, were 
initiated and new technology was introduced. Library news was communicated to 
the community regularly through local weekly newspapers and local cable 
television announcements. A brochure outlining library services was prepared 
for the library's participation in the Wilmington Cheunber of Commerce 
Exposition in May. Staff strove to keep ahead of the public in learning to 
use sophisticated new equipment that is now a basic tool in accessing 
information both inside and outside of the library. There were changes in 
staff and Trustees due to retirements and new appointments. Generous gifts to 
the library from individuals and organizations fueled progress in the area of 
new technology and new directions in the collection. Community volunteers 
gave of their time and talents which added to the momentum of energy 
propelling library services toward new levels of expectation and fulfillment. 
Town government, the Board of Library Trustees, library staff, and the 
community all provided crucial support and encouragement for a revitalized 
vision of public library service to the town. 

A burst of technological advances began early in the year when an electronic 
reading machine to assist the visually or reading impaired was presented to 
the library by the Wilmington Commission on Disabilities in January. Located 
in the Bicentennial Room, it is equipped for use with personal earphones. 




Mr. Bert Cohen demonstrates the electronic reading machine donated to the Library by the Wilmington 
Commission on Disabilities. 



-66- 



Also in January, the library made available to its patrons, a computerized 
magazine database on CD ROM. In November, free access to the Internet was 
made available through the Merrimack Valley Library Consortium terminals. 
Various local, state, national, and international information and library 
holdings are now accessible by individual library patrons through the 
Massachusetts Library Information Network, the World Wide Web, and other 
"cyberspace" sources. Job hunters used Internet sources to access employment 
opportunities. For many patrons free use of the Internet at the library was 
their introduction to the "information superhighway." 

As electronically enhanced access to information increased, traditional 
library emphasis on the joys of reading and life-long learning was focused on 
new library programs and materials. A book discussion group, "Bookends," was 
formed for adults and enjoyed monthly by an enthusiastic group of lively and 
articulate readers who enjoyed exchanging views on what they have read. New 
members joined the group throughout the year. A book discussion group for 
younger readers was started in the summer and continued through the fall when 
they named themselves "The Wild and Crazy Readers." Story Hours fpr pre- 
schoolers were filled to capacity both spring and fall; toddlers and their 
adults regularly took part in "Time for Two's." The summer reading progreun, 
"Reading is Natural," recorded 824 members. Four crafts progrsuns were held in 
the summer and a special program on sharks, a summer 's-end party and reading 
certificate awards ended the season. The December holiday celebration for 
preschoolers and their families was attended by 114 happy "guests." Among 
other programs held during the year were a special workshop for daycare 
providers, a slide presentation by the Boston Museum of Fine Arts co-sponsored 
by the Wilmington Council on the Arts, and an introduction to the use of 
personal computers in the home. School and public librarians met on a regular 
basis; the Children's Librarian gave book talks in the intermediate schools, 
and school and scouting groups scheduled visits to the library. 

Gifts from the community made valuable contributions to library service during 
the year. The highly popular Books on Tape collection and the descriptive 
video collection were increased by donations from the Wilmington Lion's Club. 
Individuals contributed to Memorial Funds, made matching-gif t donations 
through their businesses and responded to the cable television marathon "Plug 
into Literacy." Others gave gifts and money to the library or offered their 
time and talents as volunteers. The heavily used Museum Pass Progreun was 
sponsored by several organizations: The Shawsheen School PAC, the Wildwood 
School PAC, the Woburn Street School PAC, the Wilmington Council of the Arts, 
the Wilmington Garden Club and the Wilmington Community Fund. The generosity 
of all is very much appreciated. 

Major changes in personnel took place throughout the year. Library Trustee 
Lawrence Flaherty left the Board after many years of service which included 
several terms as Trustee Chair. Mary Deislinger was newly appointed to the 
Board in April. Eileen Broderick became Children's Services Librarian in May 
and David Rush retired from library service in June, having served as 
Reference Librarian for nearly ten years. Christina Stewart was appointed 
Reference and Adult Services Librarian in July and Laurel Toole joined the 
staff as Technical Services Librarian in October. At the beginning of summer, 
Scott Bishop was assigned to the library as Custodian, filling the position 
formerly occupied by Ron McCoy. 

Nineteen hundred ninety-five proved to be a significant step into the future 
for the Memorial Library. In the fall, ten months of intensive work by the 
Trustee's Long Range Planning Committee and participation by residents and 
patrons in detailed community and patron surveys culminated in a Five-Year 
Plan for the library which anticipates fruition in the year 2000. The 
committee, coordinated by Reference and Adult Services Librarian Christina 
Stewart, consisted of Trustee Chair Martha Stevenson, Library Director Sarah 
Rueter and community representatives Steven Leet and Lester White. The 
thirty-six page document was presented to the Town Manager in October and 
filed with the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners. In 1996 the 
first series of objectives and activities will be re-examined. Some are 
already on their way to being realized. 

It was a good year. 



-67- 



LIBRARY STATISTICS FOR 1995 



Hours Open Weekly 
Winter 

Monday through Saturday 9-5 
Tuesday and Thursday evenings 5-9 

Summer 

Monday through Friday 9-5 
Tuesday and Thursday evenings 5-9 

Population 

Registered Borrowers 

Percentage of population 74% 



Holdings and Acquisitions 

Number of Volumes 

Books 88,429 

AV/Non-Print 1,594 

Volumes per capita 4.54 

Subscriptions 

Newspapers 

Periodicals 

Microfilm 

Museum Passes 

Circulation 

Circulation per capita 7.33 

Interlibrary Loan 

From other libraries 1,716 
To other libraries 1,857 

Reserves 

Reference and Reader's Services 

Meeting Room Reservations 

Conference Room 165 
Bi-Centennial Room 21 

Library Programs 

Pre-school 80 

Summer Reading Progreim 1 

Group visits 10 

Special programs 22 

Adult progrcuns 15 

Total attendance at programs 

Pre-school 1,138 

Summer Reading Program 824 

Group visits 252 

Special programs 477 

Adult programs 137 

Exhibits and displays 

Children's Department 31 
Adult Department 16 



56 
48 

19,954 
14,686 

90,023 

10 
151 
14 

8 

146,302 
3,601 

4,804 

18,666 
186 

128 

2,828 
47 



-68- 



Elderly Services Department 



In 1995 we set our goal to expand our Out Reach Program. With the help of the 
media, we focused on making all residents, 60 years of age and older, along 
with younger residents living with or caring for a disabled parent, aware of 
all programs available to them through the Department of Elder Services. 

Newspapers I 

covered our I 

weekly news I 

column on I 

programs and I 

classes for I 

seniors coming I 

to the Senior I 

Center, programs I 

for the I 

homebound and I 

those caring for I 

them and I 

programs for I 

low- income I 

seniors. I 

Newspapers also I 

covered special 1 

events. Cable 1 

television I 

became an I 

important means I 

in reaching our I 

goal. We had I 

monthly coverage 1 

°^ . , Senior Citizens Christmas Fair 

Commissioners ' 

meetings, with 

speakers on an 

array of topics. 

Many of these topics plague the seniors and seemed to be unsolvable, until 
help Ceune to them through one of our guest speakers. Many complimentary calls 
come into the center from young and old residents on how much information they 
received from a guest speaker who helped them with their problems. 
Commissioner Henry Latta contributed a tremendous eunount of help by filming 
all our programs and classes, combining them on one tape that was broadcast 
many times throughout the year bringing us new seniors in 1995. Channel 5 
reporter David Boeri covered several programs held at the Senior Center and a 
few of our homebound programs, for the nightly evening news. This was a 
tremendous help with our outreach goal. After the broadcast of the progreun, 
we received many calls from seniors and feunily members for the time and days 
of our progreuns. Brochures were mailed to all. Our goal was accomplished; we 
now have a very successful Outreach Program. 

We can look back on our accomplishments with happiness. Unfortunately many of 
the elderly problems were very distressful to solve. We helped as much as we 
could. Elder abuse was this year, as in previous years, an alarming problem 
to us. In most cases the abuse was being perpetrated by a family member on 
disabled or ill elderly persons. The majority of cases were financial and 
verbal, a few physical. Many home visits were made to evaluate the living 
conditions of the seniors. We found the seniors or caregiver never expected 
an illness would leave them with so much despair. In-home care became 
expensive, as money disappeared quickly, expensive prescription drugs had to 
be stopped, all leading to elder abuse by the caregivers. We were able to 
contact federal, state and private agencies asking help for the senior. With 
free services and support groups, we did everything we could to help both 
parties cope with the stress of caring for an alzheimer or stroke patient. A 
few who had expended all their finances and assets were able, through legal 
services, to move into nursing homes. Referrals were made to Minuteman 
Homecare for monthly protective service evaluations on all these seniors. 

-69- 




Financial help for those with limited funds to fill their oil tank or pay 
their light bill was received from the Rotary, Kiwanis and Lions Clubs 
throughout the year. 




Doll table at the Christmas Fair. 



Groups, Money Management Program 
in-home nursing care. Many coun 
made to shut-ins living alone wi 
received a number of calls from 
impaired vision or difficulty wa 
appointments. Our Respite Care 



As Director of 
Elder Services, 
I met the needs 
of our elder 
residents 
through 
referrals made 
to Social 
Security for 
Supplemental 
Social Security 
Income (SSI) and 
Medicare 
problems. Food 
Stamps, 

Medicaid, Fuel, 
Elder Housing 
In JI^^^^^^^^^B '^B (congregated 

■"^I^^^^^^^^^^B) rooms 

units). 
Protective 
Services (Elder 
Abuse), Share-a- 
Ride 

transportation, 
Nursing Home 
Screenings, 
Legal Services, 
Alzheimer and 
Stroke Support 
Mental Health (drugs and alcohol abuse) and 
seling sessions were held. Home visits were 
th problems that had to be addressed. We 
our advanced aged seniors living alone with 
Iking for help getting to medical 
Provider responded to all. 



In 1995 we received 6,322 telephone calls for services and information. We 
transported by minibus 5,848 to medical and other elderly related appointments 
and shopping, traveling 15,612 miles. We delivered 15,128 meals to homebound 
seniors, traveling 20,528 miles. At the lunch site 3,576 received a meal, 
1,351 unable to use the minibus due to a disability were transported by our 
Respite Care Provider. We processed 156 applications for fuel, weatherization 
and oil burner repairs or replacements. A total of 5,023 seniors were kept 
physically fit through our aerobic exercise and dance classes, walking on our 
treadmills or stationary bikes. The Senior Center had 4,974 participate in 
our activity programs and classes, with 656 participating in our medical 
programs, while 1,764 received assistance through our social programs. 

To the following we extend our thanks for enabling us to deliver the above 
services : 



The Taxpayers for approving our budget 107,245 

Community Teamwork 71,045 

Minuteman Homecare 424,915 

Executive Office of Elder Affairs Grant 7,642 

Senior Fair Donation 4,159 



Federal, state and municipal departments. Town Manager, Town Clerk, Treasurer, 
Accountant, Board of Health, Public Buildings, Public Works, Police, School, 
for their help when requested. 



-70- 



We also thank the Town Manager for his help and guidance and the following 
clubs for their donations to the senior citizens: 

The Lions Club for their holiday catered dinner to our homebound 
seniors. 

Tewksbury /Wilmington Elks for their Annual Dinner Dance and donation 
towards the rental of their hall for our therapeutic socials. 

Kiwanis Club for their $30 monthly donation to a needy senior and their 
Annual Shut-in dinner. 

Rotary Club for their $50 monthly Demoulas Gift Certificate to a needy 
senior. 

Thanks to all the many seniors who volunteered hundreds of hours visiting 
seniors in their homes, hospitals and nursing homes, instructing our weekly 
activity classes and programs and those who volunteer on odd jobs at the 
center. To all who helped in any way to make the lives of the elderly 
residents in Wilmington more meaningful in 1995, we are very grateful. 



Commission on Disabilities 



The Wilmington Commission on Disabilities was established to address the 
issues and concerns of the disabled community, their fcunilies and other 
interested parties. 

We are pleased to announce that Selectman James Rooney has joined us, having 
been appointed as the liaison between the Commission and the Board of 
Selectmen. Also appointed as Commissioners this year are Mr. Joseph 
Franceschi and Charlotte Guthrie. 

The Commission was successful in the installation of the Xerox Reading Edge 
reading machine in the Wilmington Public Library. Commissioner Richard Gage 
provided training to library staff and townspeople in the use of this machine. 

We have, this year, been involved in advising the Saint Thomas of Villanova 
Youth Center project on the structural accessibility of the center to ensure 
accessibility to all youth in the town. 

We have subscribed to an Internet service, which will enable us to explore and 
access more information regarding handicapped affairs. 

The Commission sponsored, along with the State Office on Handicapped Affairs, 
a training seminar for architectural access in the private business sector. 
We will be sponsoring another two-day seminar this spring. 

A continuing project of the Commission is to ensure an up-to-date Handicapped 
Resource Manual. The purpose of this manual is to provide to the community a 
complete reference of handicapped services. The Commission is in the process 
of doing its annual update and would like your assistance. Anyone interested 
in having services listed, or having a change in location, phone number or 
contact person, please feel free to contact any of the Commissioners. 

We have a continuing positive relationship with Wilmington's ADA Committee, 
Wilmington Committee for Citizens with Disabilities and the Wilmington Special 
Needs Advisory Council. We look forward to working with these groups to 
provide a better life for the disabled. 



-71- 



ADA Advisory Committee 



Progress continued on creating a greater awareness of the rights and 
responsibilities under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) . Committee 
members, assisted by volunteers from WCTV, created a short documentary which 
highlighted the town's progress in making school and municipal facilities 
handicapped accessible. The documentary was broadcast by WCTV in May and 
June. 

The Committee wishes to acknowledge the accomplishments which have been made 
this year with respect to accessibility. The Public Buildings Department, 
which is responsible for maintenance of all municipal buildings, completed the 
following projects: 

* installation of automatic door openers in restrooms at the Town 
Hall 

* installation of one water fountain in the Town Hall and two water 
fountains in the West Intermediate School 

* renovation to the elevator in the Wilmington Memorial Library 
which included lowering the control panel and installation of an 
emergency telephone 

The Public Works Department installed an accessible water fountain at the Town 
Common. These efforts demonstrate a long-term commitment to making municipal 
government facilities and services accessible to all. 



Sealer of Weights and Measures 



The following is a summary of the inspections carried out from January 1, 1995 
to December 31, 1995 by the Sealer of Weights and Measures: 



Tested and sealed scales under 




100 lbs (supermarket type) 


44 


Not sealed 


1 


Tested and sealed truck scales 


3 


Tested and sealed pharmacy weights 




(apothecary and metric) 


68 


Tested and sealed gasoline meters 


165 


Adjusted gasoline meters 


25 


Tested and sealed oil truck meters 


3 


Random weight checks of prepackaged 




goods 


425 


Random visits of stores for proper 




signs and price markings 


5 


Inspection fees collected 


$2,178 



All supermarkets, oil companies, gas stations and truck scale companies have a 
professional relationship with the sealer that ensures that when repair work 
is performed on scales or meters, immediate testing occurs. The consumer can 
register complaints on improper weighings to the Assistant Town Manager's 
Office who will contact the sealer for immediate follow-up. 



-72- 



Board of Appeals 



Case 1-95 Richard Oliver Map 51 Parcel 93 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.4 and 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient front and side 
yard setback for a garage on property located on 18 Kelley Road. 

Granted - no closer than 28' froM the closest point to the front yard lot line and 
8' froa the closest point to the side yard lot line. 



Case 2-95 Melvin Keough Map 44 Parcel 27 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.4 for a lot having insufficient front yard setback for a 
single feunily dwelling for property located on Magazine Street. 

Granted - no closer than 15 feet froa the front yard lot line. 



Case 3-95 Kennedy Development Map 44 Parcels 178B, 178C 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.6, Open Space - 7.5 percent less than allowed by zoning for 
property located on 208 & 212 Main Street. 

Granted - 13.5% provided 6.5% less than allowed by zoning. 



Case 4-95 Kennedy Development Map 44 Parcel 178C 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 6.4.2.4 (Parking Setback-side yard and 
Paved Area Setback-rear yard). Sec. 6.4.4.2C (Side and Rear Yard Landscaping), for 
property located on 212 Main Street. 

Granted - Parking Setback - side, rear and front. Paved Area Setback-rear yard and 
side, rear and front yard Landscaping. 



Case 5-95 Peter Stratos Map 88 Parcel 18 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot for 
property located on High Street. 

Granted - No more than two hammerhead lots shall have contiguous frontage and the 
lot shall not be further subdivided. 



Case 6-95 Richard Gore Map 70 Parcel 93 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient side and rear yard setback 
for an aboveground pool for property located on 51 Salem Street. 

Granted - No closer than 8' from the rear yard lot line and 4' from the side yard 
lot line for the life of the pool. 



Case 7-95 C. N. Wood Company Map Rl Parcel pt 306C 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 3.6.3 (Heavy Vehicular Dealership and 
Repair Garage) authorizing the operation of a heavy vehicular dealership and repair 
garage for property located on Jonspin Road. 

Denied - Air and noise pollution not addressed by applicant. 



-73- 



Case 8-95 



Sigfrid Olson 



Map 40 Parcel 154 



A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient side and rear yard setback 
for a garage for property located on 68 Lowell Street. 

Withdravm - Without prejudice. 



Case 9-95 Sigfrid Olson Map 40 Parcel 154 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot for 
property located on 68 Lowell Street and Molloy Road. 

Granted - No acre than two haauierhead lots having contiguous frontage and the lot 
shall not be further subdivided. 



Case 10-95 Aleppo Temple Map 99 Parcel 135 

A special permit from Sec. 4.1.9 to conduct fairs, bazaars, antique shows and 
carnivals for property located on 99 Fordheun Road. 

Granted - Two years, changes in schedule will be sutde in writing, schedule for 
1996 will be submitted when complete and appropriate notification to 
Fire, Police and other appropriate departments at least three months 
before event. 



Case 11-95 John Garrett Map 79 Parcel 115 

A special permit under Sec. 4.1.6 authorizing the parking of a commercial vehicle in 
excess of a 135" wheel base (Utility Van) for property located at 21 Douglas Avenue. 

Denied - Exceeds 135" wheel base. 



Case 12-95 Joseph D. Williams Map 11 Parcel 58B 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.1, 5.2.2 and 5.2.3 for a lot having insufficient area, 
frontage and lot width for a single feunily dwelling for property located on 42 
Hopkins Street. 

Granted - Neighboring and abutting lots have been developed as RIO and R20 lots 
and this lot would be consistent with residential character of 
neighborhood . 



Case 13-95 Joseph D. Williams Map 11 Parcel 58B 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.1, 5.2.2, 5.2.3 and 5.2.4 to allow an existing dwelling to 
remain as situated on a lot having insufficient area, frontage, lot width and front 
yard setback for property located on 42 Hopkins Street. 

Granted - To remain as situated on the lot. 



Case 14-95 J. Christopher Neville Map 86 Parcel 8C 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient side yard setback for a 
garage for property located on 8 Great Neck Drive. 

Granted - no closer than 16 feet from the side yard lot line. 



-74- 



Case 15-95 Wilmington 4th of July Committee Map 63 Parcel 10 

A special permit to hold a carnival during the Fourth of July celebrations from June 
28 through July 4, 1995, for property located on Church Street. 

Granted 



Case 16-95 Whit Elm, Inc. Map R4 Parcel 28 

A variance to allow an existing dwelling to remain as situated in the front yard 
setback for property located on 18 Blueberry Lane. 

Granted - no closer than 38 feet froa the curve of the road. 



Case 17-95 Kenneth R. Feindel, Jr. Map 45 Parcel 80A 

A special permit to amend a previous decision (Case 17-90) to extend a deck to 
encroach no further into the side yard setback than the existing dwelling for 
property located on 24 Cottage Street. 

Granted - no closer than the existing deck to the front yard setback and no 
closer than the existing dwelling to the side yard lot line. 



Case 18-95 W. S. Cavanaugh Map 42 Parcel 11 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 6.1.2.2 authorizing an alteration and 
extension of a nonconforming structure for property located on 374 Main Street. 

Granted - does not exceed 50% of the combined floor area. 



Case 19-95 James & Eleanor Demos Map 11 Parcel 58C 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.2 to construct a single family dwelling on a lot having 
insufficient frontage for property located on 40 Hopkins Street. 

Pending 



Case 20-95 Timothy Gish Map 43 Parcel 23 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient side yard setback for a 
garage for property located on 8 Railroad Avenue. 

Granted - to demolish the existing garage and build a garage no closer than 12 
feet from the nearest point to the side yard lot line. 



Case 21-95 John Brown Map 53 Parcel 33 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 6.1.2.1 authorizing a garage on a 
nonconforming lot for property located on 8 Brattle Street. 

Granted - no closer than 10 feet from the side yard lot line. 



Case 22-95 Philip A. Buonomo Jr. Map 34 Parcel 76 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 6.1.2.2 for an addition on a nonconforming 
lot for property located on 145 Grove Avenue. 

Granted - no closer than the existing dwelling from Winchell Road and no closer 
than 26 feet from Grove Avenue. 



-75- 



Case 23-95 Paul L. Chalifour Map 11 Parcel 58 

A special permit for an addition, front porch, on a nonconforming lot for property 
located on 48 Hopkins Street. 

Granted - no closer than 29 feet froa the front yard lot line. 



Case 24-95 Mark A. Lopez Map 107 Parcel 3 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot for 
property located on Lot 15B Stonehedge Drive. 

Granted - no acre than two hammerhead lots shall have contiguous frontage and lot 
shall not be further subdivided. 



Case 25-95 Roland Sturtevant Map 2 Parcel 15 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a heunmerhead lot for 
property located on Hillside Way. 

Granted - no more than tvio hammerhead lots shall have contiguous frontage and lot 
shall not be further subdivided. 



Case 26-95 L. A. Associates Map 9 Parcel pt 21C 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.2 and 5.2.3 for a lot having insufficient frontage and lot 
width for a single family dwelling for property located on Lot 4 Avon Street. 

Granted - insufficient frontage and lot width. 



Case 27-95 L. A. Associates Map 9 Parcel pt 21C 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.2, 5.2.3 and 5.2.4 for a lot having insufficient frontage, 
width and front yard setback for a single family dwelling for property located on 
Lot 3 Avon Street. 

Granted - insufficient frontage, width, front and side yard setback. 



Case 28-95 L. A. Associates Map 9 Parcels pt 18, 19 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.2, 5.2.3 and 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient frontage, 
width and side yard setback for a single family dwelling for property located on Lot 
2 Avon Street. 

Granted - insufficient frontage, width and side yard setback. 



Case 29-95 L. A. Associates Map 9 Parcel 18 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.1, 5.2.2, 5.2.3 and 5.2.4 for a lot having insufficient 

area, frontage, width and front yard setback for a single family dwelling for 
property located on Lot 1 Avon Street. 

Granted - insufficient area, frontage, width and front yard setback. 



Case 30-95 Paul Gallant Map 35 Parcel 15 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient side and rear yard setbacks 
for a pool for property located on 30 Clark Street. 

Granted - no closer than four feet from the rear and side yard lot lines. 



-76- 



Case 31-95 



Michael & Michelle Stokes 



Map 36 Parcel 134A 



A variance from Sec. 5.2.4 and 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient front and side 
yard setbacks for a pool for property located on 10 Kansas Road. 

Granted - no closer than 20 feet froa the front yard lot line on Kansas Road. 



Case 32-95 



John Gearty 



Map 6 Parcel 53 



A variance from Sec. 5.2.4 for a lot having insufficient front yard setback for a 
garage for property located on 14 Swain Road. 

Granted - no closer than 16 feet froa Wall Street. 



Case 33-95 



Carl Crupi 



Map 35 Parcel 64 



A variance from Sec. 5.2.3, 5.2.4 and 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient width and 
setback for a single family dwelling for property located on Bradford Street. 

Granted - no closer than 26 feet froa the front yard lot line and no closer than 
14 feet froa the rear yard lot line. 



Case 34-95 



William J. Rooney 



Map 1 Parcel pt 10 



A special permit from Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot for property located 
on Chestnut Street. 

Granted - no more than two hammerhead lots shall have contiguous frontage and the 
lot shall not be further subdivided. 



Case 35-95 



William J. Rooney 



Map 1 Parcel 10 



A variance from Sec. 5.2.2 and 5.2.3 to allow an existing dwelling to remain as 
situated on a lot having insufficient frontage and width for property located on 
Chestnut Street. 

Granted - to remain as situated on the lot. 



Case 36-95 



Wilmington Post American Legion 



Map 52 Parcel pt 21 



A variance from Sec. 5.2.1, 5.2.2, 5.2.3 and 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient 
frontage, width, area and setbacks for a single fcunily dwelling for property located 
on Adams Street. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 37-95 



Wilmington Post American Legion 



Map 52 Parcel pt 21 



A variance from Sec. 5.2.1, 5.2.2, 5.2.3 and 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient 
frontage, width, area and setbacks for a single feunily dwelling for property located 
on Adams Street. 



Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 38-95 



Loring Realty Trust 



Map 29 Parcel pt 15A 



A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 authorizing an existing dwelling to remain as situated on 
a lot having insufficient side yard setback for property located on Burlington 
Avenue. 



Granted - existing dwelling to remain as situated in side yard setback. 



-77- 



Case 39-95 Loring Realty Trust Map 29 Parcel pt 15A 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 authorizing a hammerhead lot for 
property located on Burlington Avenue. 

Granted - no more than two hamerhead lots shall have contiguous frontage and the 
lot shall not be further subdivided. 



Case 40-95 John J. Donate Map 81 Parcel 55A 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient side yard setback for a 
garage for property located on 8 Cedarcrest Road. 

Granted - no closer than 7 1/2 feet from the side yard lot line. 



Case 41-95 Richard & Kristine Jay Map 34 Parcel 42C 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.4 and 5.3.1 for a lot having insufficient front yard 
setback for a porch for property located on 3 Grove Terrace. 

Granted - no closer than 22 feet from the front yard lot line. 



Case 42-95 Daniel R. Blanch Map 35 Parcel 65A 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient rear yard setback for a 

pool for property located on 4 Rhode Island Road. 

Granted - no closer than four feet froai the rear yard lot line for the life of the 
pool . 



Case 43-95 Phil Cheverie, Souper Deli Map 40 Parcel 6 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 3.5.4, Limited Service Restaurant for 
property located on 35 Lowell Street. 

Granted - no more than 20 seats. 



Case 44-95 Michael F. Murphy Map 54 Parcel 94 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient rear yard setback for a 
pool for property located on 12 Carmel Street. 

Granted - pool and deck to be no closer than nine feet from the side and nine feet 
from the rear yard lot line. 



Case 45-95 Elaine Raposa Map 44 Parcel 158 

To appeal the decision of the Building Inspector with regard to property located on 
Fanueil Drive and Massachusetts Avenue. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 46-95 Just Desserts Map Rl Parcel 18F 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 3.6.6 General Manufacturing with regard to 
property located on 16 Upton Drive. 

Granted - subject to site plan review. 



-78- 



Case 47-95 



Donald L. Mercier 



Map 103 Parcel 13 



A variance from Sec. 5.2.1, 5.2.2, 5.2.3, 5.2.4 and 5.2.5 to allow an existing 
dwelling to remain as situated on a lot having insufficient frontage, area, width 
and setbacks for property located on 47 Andover Street. 

Granted - to allow the existing dwelling to remain as situated on the lot. 



Case 48-95 Donald L. Mercier Map 103 Parcel 13A 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.1, 5.2.2, 5.2.3, 5.2.4 and 5.2.5 to allow an existing 
dwelling to remain as situated on a lot having insufficient frontage, area, width 
and setbacks for property located on 47A Andover Street. 

Granted - to allow the existing dwelling to reaain as situated on the lot. 



Case 49-95 Michael J. Gracia Map 51 Parcel 30, 31 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 3.3.2 for an accessory apartment for 
property located on 2 State Street. 

Granted - as proposed on plan of land dated 5/22/95 by K. J. Miller and the 

addition would be no closer than 27 feet from the front yard lot line. 



Case 50-95 Robert Bernardo Map 36 Parcel 17 

A special permit to allow an existing carport to remain as situated within the side 
yard setback and a variance for a shed to remain as situated within the rear yard 
setback for property located on 8 Jere Road. 

Granted - to allow the carport and shed to remain as situated for the life of the 
carport and shed. 



Case 51-95 Richard M. Green, Jr. Map 36 Parcel 136 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient side yard setback for a 
deck for property located on 12 Kansas Road. 

Granted - no closer than 12 feet from the side yard lot line abutting Map 36 
parcel 136 for the life of the deck. 



Case 52-95 Cheryl M. Prior Map 40 Parcel 91 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient side and rear yard setback 
for a pool for property located on 13 Parker Street. 

Granted - no closer than 10 feet from the rear and side yard lot lines for the 
life of the pool. 



Case 53-95 George Barnes c/o R. Peterson Map 65 Parcel 5B 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 authorizing a hammerhead lot for 
property located on 246 Middlesex Avenue. 

Pending 



-79- 



Case 54-95 Wilmington Arena Authority Map 53 Parcels 178, 178D 

To amend Board of Appeals Case 54-94 by eliminating the need of constructing any 
additional landscape buffer than has previously been planted on the subject 
premises . 

Granted - to amend. 



Case 55-95 James Mangano Map 6 Parcels 119, 120, 121, 122, 123 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.2 and 5.2.3 for a lot having insufficient frontage and lot 
width for a single faunily dwelling for property located on Burlington Avenue. 

Granted - as shown on a plan of land dated 5/13/95. 



Case 56-95 Wayne M. Barrasso Map 61 Parcel 7A 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 4.2 to allow an accessory apartment for 
property located on 157 Federal Street. 

Granted - addition meets setback requirements, meets requirements for accessory 

apartment. 



Case 57-95 Edward C. Hill, Sr. Map 49 Parcel 38 

To appeal the decision of the Building Inspector in regard to property located on 
Lots 38A, 38B and 38C Ash Street. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 58-95 Sharon Breault Map 89 Parcel 13A 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 3.5.4 (Limited Service Restaurant) for 
property located on 380 Middlesex Avenue. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 59-95 Jerzy Rak Map 67 Parcel 59 

A variance for a lot having insufficient side yard setback for a deck for property 
located on 25 King Street. 

Granted - no closer than 11 feet from the side yard lot line for the life of the 
deck. 



Case 60-95 Hilda M. Hudson Map 44 Parcel 37, 38 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.1, 5.2.2 and 5.2.3 for a lot having insufficient area, 
frontage and lot width for a single feunily dwelling for property located on Hobson 
Avenue. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 61-95 Hazel A. Guiffre Map 44 Parcels 37, 38 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.1, 5.2.2 and 5.2.3 for a lot having insufficient area, 
frontage and lot width for a single family dwelling for property located on Wisser 
Street. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



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Case 62-95 



James Miceli 



Map 30 Parcel 7E 



A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient side yard setback for a 
garage/addition for property located on 11 Webber Street. 

Granted - no closer than 9 feet froM the side yard lot line. 



Case 63-95 Richard Saporito Map 19 Parcel 22A 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient rear yard setback for an 
addition for property located on 7 Marrietta Avenue. 

Granted - an addition to be no closer than IS feet froa the rear yard lot line and 
for an existing shed to remain as situated 10 feet froa the rear yard 
lot line, for the life of the shed. 



Case 64-95 Peter S. Smith Map 87 Parcel 6A 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient side yard setback for a 
pool for property located on 47 High Street. 

Granted - no closer than 12 feet from the side yard lot line for the life of the 
pool . 



Case 65-95 Ravindran Sundar Map 19 Parcel 18D 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient rear yard setback for a 
deck for property located on 7 Bailey Road. 

Granted - no closer than 14 feet from the rear yard lot line. 



Case 66-95 Catherine Basso c/o R. Peterson Map 16 Parcel 58 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.1, 5.2.2 and 5.2.3 for a lot having insufficient area, 
frontage and lot width for a single family dwelling for property located on Canyon 
Street . 

Pending 



Case 67-95 Paul F. Fullerton Map 55 Parcels 91, 91A 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.1, 5.2.2 and 5.2.3 for a lot having insufficient area, 
frontage and lot width for a single family dwelling for property located on Lot 91B 
Beverly Avenue. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 68-95 Paul F. Fullerton Map 55 Parcels 91, 91A 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.1, 5.2.2 and 5.2.3 for a lot having insufficient area, 
frontage and lot width for a single family dwelling for property located on Lot 91C 
Beverly Avenue. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



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Case 69-95 



John & Carolann Blenkhorn 



Map 12 Parcel 1 



A variance from Sec. 3.3 for a lot zoned R20 with a pre-existing use of General 
Business for property located on 943 Main Street. 

Findings - property has been used for business or coauiercial purposes continuously 
to the present. The property has been zoned residential but has been 
used for business purposes continuously. This nonconforming use has 
never been abandoned and continues to the present. 



Case 70-95 Robert Foss Map 8 Parcel 24 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 authorizing an inground pool to remain as situated within 
the reserved side yard area for property located on Baldwin Road. 

Denied - a one and one-half foot side yard setback would be detriaental or 

injurious to the neighborhood, with the stipulation that the Inspector 
of Buildings take no enforcement action against the applicant to correct 
the side yard violation until June 1, 1996. 



Case 71-95 Wen-Der Wang Map 69 Parcel 34B 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient side and rear yard setback 
for a shed for property located on 61 Faulkner Avenue. 

Granted - no closer than seven feet from the side yard lot line and two feet from 
the rear yard lot line for the life of the shed. 



Case 72-95 Gregory Boutoures Map 35 Parcel 208 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient side yard setback for an 
addition for property located on 18 Ohio Street. 

Granted - no closer than 10 feet from the side yard lot line on Frisco Road. 



Case 73-95 William O'Rourke Map 44 Parcel 1 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 3.5.16 Vehicle Dealership for used cars for 
property located on 205 Main Street. 

Pending 



Case 74-95 James & Brenda Walsh Map 58 Parcel 319 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient side and rear yard setback 
for an above ground pool for property located on 15 Crystal Road. 

Granted - no closer than eleven feet from the side yard lot line for the life of 
the pool . 



Case 75-95 Edward R. Benard Map 40 Parcel 161 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient side and rear yard setback 
for an inground pool for property located on 9 Commonwealth Avenue. 

Granted - no closer than eight feet from the side yard lot line and fourteen feet 
from the rear yard lot line for the life of the pool. 



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Case 76-95 



Jean M. Bruno 



Map 86 Parcels 4,2,2A 



A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 to allow an existing dwelling to remain as situated in 
the side yard setback for property located on 349 Woburn Street. 

Granted - to allow the exlBting dwelling to remain 23 1/2 feet fron the front yard 
lot line on a street not yet naaed. 



Case 77-95 Woods Abbott Map 86 Parcel lOD 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient side yard setback for a 
garage for property located on 14 Allgrove Lane. 

Granted - no closer than 12 feet from the side yard lot line. 



Case 78-95 Robert D. DiGuardia Map 28 Parcel 23 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 4.2.7 Accessory Apartment-Addition for 
property located on 26 Towpath Drive. 

Pending 



Case 79-95 Philip Rhind Map 29 Parcel 15A 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient side yard setback for a 
garage for property located on 86 Burlington Avenue. 

Withdrawn - without prejudice. 



Case 80-95 John & Kim Broussard Map 86 Parcel 39 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient side yard setback for a 
garage for property located on 5 Allgrove Lane. 

Granted - no closer than 19 feet from the side yard lot line. 



Case 81-95 Richard P. Rivers Map 7 Parcel 81 

A variance to allow an existing deck to remain as situated in the rear yard setback 
for property located on 5 Taft Road. 

Granted - no closer than 11 feet from the rear yard lot line. 



Case 82-95 Batten Bros. Map R2 Parcel 23F 

A variance from Sec. 6.3.2.3 (larger) and 6.3.5.1 (higher) Signs for property 
located on 246 Ballardvale Street. 

Pending 



Case 83-95 Craig S. Newhouse Map 69 Parcel 65 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.2 for a lot having insufficient frontage for a single 
feunily dwelling for property located on Cherry Street. 

Granted - construction of thirty feet of roadway in front of said lot will afford 
adequate access and egress from said lot and will meet the minimum 
street requirements of Sec. 1.3.12 of the Zoning Bylaw. 



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Case 84-95 



Dolores Lord c/o R. Peterson 



Map 18 Parcel 15 



A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 to authorize a hammerhead lot for 
property located on 9 Boutwell Street. 

Pending 



Case 85-95 Jennifer LePore c/o D. Brown Map 58 Parcel pt 

12 

A special permit in accordance with Sec. 5.3.4 authorizing a hammerhead lot for 
property located on Woburn Street. 

Pending 



Case 86-95 Michael Sirois Map 9 Parcel 65A 

A variance from Sec. 5.2.4 and 5.2.5 for a lot having insufficient rear, side and 
front yard setback for an inground pool for property located on 9 Cambridge Avenue. 

Pending 



Case S-1-95 New England Landevelopment Map 6 Parcels 20, 27, 43 

To construct a road not shown or made part of the Official Map on ways shown as 
Mather, Walnut, Poplar, Cedar Street (known as Polk Street) and Norfolk Street 
(known as Sharon Street). 

Denied 



Case S-2-95 New England Landevelopment Map 11 Parcel 5C 

To construct a road not shown or made part of the Official Map on ways shown as 
Third Avenue and Edgeworth Street. 

Denied 




One of three ice sculptures that decorated the Town Common during the Christmas Tree lighting 
ceremonies. 



-84- 



Council For The Arts 



Approximately ten years ago, in April of 1986, the Annual Town Meeting 
unanimously passed an article seeking matching funds to develop the vacant 
"Old Town Hall" as a center for artistic and cultural pursuit. Since the 
School Department required storage space for the duration of the High School 
renovation project, the building could not be turned over to the Wilmington 
Council for the Arts until late fall. In the ensuing years from 1986 through 
1995 the lovely, historic old building has been the scene of hundreds of 
enriching activities. The Council has sponsored art exhibitions and art 
demonstrations, concerts, lectures, art, drama and dance classes, a "Festival 
of Trees" in December and a "Coffeehouse" in November. Weekly music 
rehearsals continue in the Arts Center by the Merrimack Valley Chapter of 
"Sweet Adelines," a vocal music group. A Youth Chorus under the able 
direction of Carolyn Stanhope was formed and the 21 young people who performed 
at the December concert at the Arts Center showed the result of Mrs. 
Stanhope's professional training. 

The Wilmington Council is, in part, supported by the Massachusetts Cultural 
Council whose purpose is to raise funds to be used for community arts. Their 
objective is to promote cultural resources, to ensure the continued 
contribution of these resources to local communities and to involve as many 
citizens as possible in some aspect of cultural activity. To this end, in 
1995 the Council distributed $5,822 in grants and PASS awards to applicants; 
the PASS (Performing Arts Students Series) awards made possible the fact that 
266 students attended theater performances or visited the Museum of Fine Arts 
in Boston. 

Passes to the Museum of Fine Arts and the Gardner Museum were awarded for 
distribution by the Wilmington Memorial Library. A grant, as recjuested by the 
Council to permit the continuation of the Arts Center progreunming, classes, 
art exhibitions and demonstrations, art purchases and upkeep, was approved. 

The Fifteenth Annual Art Exhibition was held on Saturday and Sunday, June 24 
and 25, 1995. From its early days under a tent on the Common, to the lovely 
ambiance of the Arts Center, the annual art exhibition has become a tradition 
during Wilmington's summer season. Friends greeting friends lends an "Old 
Home Week" atmosphere - in spite of their not always agreeing on the merits of 
individual works of art. Three professional artists judged the show: 

PUI-SHAN LUCINA ROARK of Wilmington - Teacher and lecturer with a degree of 
Master of Arts in Printmaking. 

DEBBIE EVANS who has her own gallery in Haverhill. 

SERGIO RUFO of Scituate - a talented artist and demonstrator. The John Brooks 
award was given to Ruth Myers Laider of Wilmington who has shown remarkable 
progress in her work. Marion Martorella won the "Most Popular" vote for her 
"Stein Still Life" in oil. For the third consecutive year Leda Sullivan of 
Cambridge won First Prize for her "Still Life" in oil. Second Prize in 
Oil/Acrylic went to Philip MacKenzie, Jr. for his painting entitled 
"30/Sept/55" Third Prize in Acrylic was awarded to Stephen Greco for "Rogue" 
Honorable Mention in this category was awarded to three individual artists: 
Gertrude Donovan, Marguerite Elia and Ellen Lefavour Slowley. In the 
Watercolor category Madeline Lord won First Prize for "Pansies"; Louise 
Anderson (our teacher of Watercolors at the Arts Center) won Second Prize for 
"Cast Shadows" and Third Prize went to Betsy Tate for "Bird of Paradise." 
Allan Chambers received Honorable Mention in this category. 

In Pastels/Pen & Ink category, Lexie Donahue won First Prize; Jean Marie 
Carbone, Second and Amber Miles, Third. Honorable Mention went to Carol A. 
Trout . 

In Photography, Barrett Bacall received First Prize; Olivia Zam Bom, Second 
and Third, Johnette Guild. 



-85- 



student 

Exhibitors who 
won prizes were 
as follows: 
First to Ruth 
Myers Laider; 
Second to Carol 
Wilson and Third 
was awarded to 
Jane Crane. An 
important and 
SRO event in 
1995 was the 
appearance of 
George Shedd, 
well-known and 
respected in the 
art community, 
at the Arts 
Center in April. 
Mr. Shedd 
critiqued 
individual 
paintings by 

1995 Annual Art Exhibition Award Winners. members of the 

audience. Mr. 
Shedd 's 

appraisal was expert and, at times, reassuring to an aspiring artist. 

Three demonstrations in such diverse disciplines as the Art of Bonsai, Soap 
Carving and crafting of Indian headdresses were sponsored by the Arts Council 
during the year. Mr. Wayne Jope, who has a floral shop in Wenheun, discussed 
the Art of Bonsai, likening it to sculpturing and painting with living 
material. In December, Mr. Leo Lambert conducted a workshop for children in 
grades one through six demonstrating the use of soap as an art medium in 
carving. Mr. Bud Thibault of Reading, a Native American of Lakota-Sioux 
ancestry, demonstrated the crafting of headdresses called "Roaches" from such 
things as deer tail and porky hair and moose and buffalo hair. 

In a more conventional vein, the Council sponsored Mr. Peter Spataro, 
artist/demonstrator in a watercolor demonstration in May. He paints in all 
media in a wide variety of subject matters including portraits and figures. 

Mr. Roy Crane was in charge of a "Hobby Model Show" whose title did not do 
justice to the wonderful and exciting models displayed in the show. Boats, 
planes, cars and trains of tremendous dimensions and detail highlighted works 
by Wilmington residents. It is with eager anticipation that viewers look 
forward to a similar show in 1996. A coffeehouse was held in November, 
featuring a group called "NVELLADOS," a well-known band who provided music of 
the 50s, 60s and 70s. 

Another musical event of much enjoyment was provided by a group of 250 young 
people called "Strings Attached." In 1987, Mr. Ward Dilmore organized a group 
of 12 young people in a string program consisting of violin, viola, cello and 
guitar. Some of the group performed in concert at the Arts Center on December 
17. It is anticipated that the young musicians from Wilmington will travel to 
England in April of 1996 to complement the 60 students from Holmfirth, England 
who were hosted by Wilmington parents. 

In December, the Arts Council joined the Garden Club in a "Festival of Trees" 
which transformed the Arts Center into a Holiday Wonderland. Several 
organizations and businesses in town decorated trees, as did the Arts Council 
and Women's Club. 

The Council very much appreciates the assistance of the town departments as 
provided by Roger Lessard and Bob Palmer with such good will. Under their 
direction, their workers do professional work. 




-86- 



Officers of the Council for the Arts are: David Maison, Chairman; Elizabeth 
White, Assistant Chairman; Anne Buzzell, Treasurer; Jane Crane, Recording 
Secretary; Frances Keough, Corresponding Secretary/Publicity. 

The Council is grateful for the support of the people of Wilmington, the Board 
of Selectmen and the Town Manager. 



Metropolitan Area Planning Council 



In order to increase its ability to serve its local communities, MAPC has made 
an increasing effort over the past year to add new programs and technologies 
that will enhance our existing programs. The agency recently purchased 
MassTrac and MuniLaw, two services that allow MAPC to answer questions on 
current legislative action and local zoning and general by-laws. 
Additionally, the agency continues to work with the Massachusetts Municipal 
Association's Local Net to post information relevant to its communities. 
Communities that have a modem and are not yet part of the network may call 
MAPC in order to obtain a license that will allow them to participate in this 
progreun. 

The agency's Data Center has recently compiled new community profiles for each 
community and has developed new 25-year population age group and household 
forecasts for the region. These projections will be used in planning for new 
infrastructure and in the delivery of municipal services in the region. 
MAPC's Geographic Information Systems (CIS) department organized a municipal 
CIS user's group that meets to share information and help one another. The 
department also received a state grant to conduct workshops providing 
technical assistance to local communities on how to best plan for their own 
CIS needs. 

Transportation issues continue to be a major concern for local municipalities. 
MAPC works with them to help get their projects ready for the Transportation 
Improvement Program (TIP) . The agency recently hosted a public meeting to 
provide information on the Transportation Enhancement Program so that local 
governments will have a better chance to make their projects competitive. In 
order to improve air quality, the federal and state governments encourage new 
and creative approaches under what is called the Transportation Demand 
Management Program. MAPC works with local communities to help them formulate 
their applications for funding under this program. Additionally, this year 
the agency introduced Commuter Check, a program that utilizes a federal 
subsidy to allow employers to provide their employees with a tax free 
transportation benefit. Employers can purchase up to $60 a month per employee 
in travel vouchers which their workers can use for commuting by bus, boat, 
subway, train or vanpool. The goal is to reduce the number of single 
occupancy vehicles on the road, thus improving air quality, conserving energy 
and easing the overcrowding of the roadways. Any size business can 
participate. 

Two other transportation-related programs, that MAPC has worked on over the 
past year, are the Greater Boston Clean Cities Initiative and the Regional 
Bicycle/Pedestrian Committee effort. The Clean Cities Initiative is a 
national program that assists communities and public agencies in acquiring 
clean fuel vehicles by assisting with the incremental cost differences between 
these vehicles and conventional fuel vehicles. 

Through this program, communities have the opportunity to acquire electric or 
compressed natural gas vehicles for use in their municipal fleets. The 
program, through the use of congestion mitigation/air q[uality funding in the 
TIP can subsidize the additional costs associated with purchasing clean fuel 
vehicles. The group is also working with the private sector to help set up 
the necessary infrastructure to support these new vehicles. MAPC has acted as 
the major staff support for the Boston effort. MAPC staff has also been very 
instrumental in helping with numerous bicycle planning efforts in the area 
including helping to develop a regional bicycle/pedestrian plan. The agency 
has assisted the Bicycle Coalition of Massachusetts in setting up a series of 
public meetings as part of their contract with the state to inventory existing 

-87- 



and potential bicycle facilities throughout the state. The staff has also 
worked with a number of local groups and projects including: the North Shore 
Bicycle Coalition, the Assabet River Rail Trial organization, the 
Met roWest/ SWAP bikeway and the Central MA Branch feasibility study. 

MAPC continues to offer its pavement management program to all its 
communities. This year, in an effort to increase efficiency and be more 
compatible with the other regional planning agencies throughout the state, 
MAPC has changed the software it uses to VHB's Road Manager. For the first 
time, the agency hired and trained college students to carry out roadway 
inspections. This worked very well and the agency intends to continue the 
practice in the future. 

The Council has continued its active legislative efforts on behalf of its 
cities and towns. On the state level, MAPC played an active role in passing, 
supporting, and/or initiating scores of planning-related efforts including: 
the Metropolitan Highway System, the Open Space Bond bill, the River 
Protection bill, the MegaBoston bill, the Budget, the Transportation Bond 
bill, and the Growing Smart legislation. A successful amendment proposed by 
MAPC to the Metropolitan Highway System bill, requires the state to disclose 
the results of a feasibility study on creating a dedicated funding source for 
the Central Artery to local municipalities for their review before the state 
can take any legislative action. 

This past year, MAPC placed an increasing emphasis on federal legislative 
priorities. MAPC met individually with six members of the Massachusetts 
delegation to discuss important federal legislative initiatives affecting 
local and regional efforts, including the reauthorization of the Economic 
Development Act (EDA), the Safe Drinking and Clean Water Acts, Housing and 
Urban Development (HUD) reform, and the reorganization of the Department of 
Transportation among the issues. 

The agency continues to review and comment on Environmental Impact Reports 
(EIRs) that are seen as having regional impacts. Staff handles hundreds of 
calls a year asking for information on a wide range of subjects. They also 
worked with a variety of local planning groups and sponsor or co-sponsor 
several dozen public meetings a year. 

The North Suburban Planning Council is composed of the following communities: 
Bedford, Burlington, Lexington, Lynnfield, North Reading, Reading, Stoneham, 
Wilmington, Winchester and Woburn. The Council normally meets the second 
Wednesday morning of the month. 

This past year, the subregion worked to follow-up on the North Suburban Water 
Supply Protection Plan that was developed for them by MAPC staff. They also 
initiated a series of evening meetings to facilitate the participation of 
local selectmen. Additionally, they reviewed all the transportation proposals 
and projects for the region including the Regional Transportation Center at 
the Industri-Plex site. 

Recently, the group began a research project on assisted living facilities. 
This study will be completed in 1996. 

MAPC staff attended a meeting organized for the purpose of forming a regional 
emergency management committee. The committee will seek to track hazardous 
materials stored within the region's boundaries. They plan to apply for 
funding from the MA Emergency Management Agency in order to do this. Staff 
also attended meetings of the J.T. Berry Reuse Committee. 

Recycling Advisory Committee 

The Committee met once in 1995 to review the status of the town's recycling 
program. Residents recycled 1,035 tons of newspaper, 285 tons of glass, 
aluminum, steel and plastic and nearly 67 tons of white goods. Curbside and 
drop-off leaf and yard waste collection diverted 489 tons of material from the 
waste stream. Wilmington residents are invited to help themselves to the 
finished compost which is available at the Drop-Off Center on Old Main Street 
in South Wilmington. 



-88- 



The town obtained 250 compost bins through a grant from the state Department 
of Environmental Protection (DEP). With assistance from Julie Gosse and David 
Grise, two local experts on composting, the town sponsored three composting 
workshops. In addition to providing valuable information about the art of 
composting, attendees at the workshops were able to purchase compost bins. To 
date the town has sold over 100 bins. Proceeds from the sale of the bins will 
be used to purchase additional compost bins. Residents may purchase either 
The Brave New Composter or the Earth Machine. Each sell for $18.00, well 
below the retail cost for compost bins. 

For information about The Brave New Composter contact the Public Works 
Department at 658-4481. Contact the Public Buildings Department at 658-3017 
for information about the Earth Machine. 



Department of Public Works 

In accordance with the By-Laws of the Town of Wilmington, I hereby 
respectfully submit the Annual Report on the activities of the Wilmington 
Department of Public Works for the year 1995. 

The Department of Public Works consists of six (6) divisions: Highway, Tree, 
Cemetery, Parks & Grounds, Engineering and Water & Sewer. The coordinating of 
all the activities of all divisions allows the town the optimum use of 
manpower, equipment and materials which control cost. 



Highway Division (658-4481) 



All regular highway maintenance work was carried out during the year, such as 
sweeping streets, installing street and warning signs, patching streets, 
cleaning catch basins, cutting brush along the roadsides, picking up trash 
along our roadsides, painting and replacing guardrails, repairing broken 
curbing, painting safety lines and crosswalks on streets, etc. 



Safety Projects; 

Sidewalk 

Construction: 

The funds for 
sidewalk 
construction 
this year came 
from Chapter 90 
Improvement s . 
This year we 
constructed 
sidewalks on 
Nichols Street 
from Fairmeadow 
Road to the 
Tewksbury line 
on the east side 
and from 
Fairmeadow Road 
to Flagstaff 
Road on the west 
side. The 
construction of 
this sidewalk 
will improve the 
safety of school 
children who 
walk to school 

and will expand our network of sidewalks for safety of all residents. 




Every construction job needs a "Super" and the Nichols Street sidewalk 
construction job was no exception. 



Intersection Improvements: We reconstructed the intersection of North Street 
and Longview Road which allows for a safer traffic flow for the area 
residents. 



-89- 



Chapter 90 Improveroents ; A finish course of hot top was applied on Roosevelt 
Road and Taft Road. 



A binder course and finish course were applied to the following: Thrush Road, 
Ballardvale Street, Everett Avenue and Wicks Circle. We also removed and 
replaced the hot top sidewalk on Wicks Circle. 

A binder course was applied to Woburn Street from Concord Street to the Woburn 
Street School. The finish coat will be applied in the spring. 

Drainage ; Drainage ditches, systems and culverts were installed, repaired, 
flushed or extended at the following locations: Burnap Street, Wightman Road, 
Hilltop Road, Marjorie Road, Kenwood Avenue, Roosevelt Road, Federal Street, 
Fordham Road, Lowell Street, Forest Street, Faulkner Avenue, Burt Road, Beech 
Street and Fairfield Road. 



The Department of Public Works assisted the stream maintenance "Clean Up Day" 
volunteers by cleaning up the debris that the volunteers removed from the 
brooks and streams throughout town. Many thanks to the volunteers for a job 
well done. 




Snow & Ice 
Removal ; 



The Highway 
Division 
recorded 24.25" 
of snow. Snow & 
ice removal is a 
very expensive 
and major 
function of the 
Department of 
Public Works in 
trying to keep 
our roads free 
from ice & snow 
and as safe as 
possible during 
the winter 
months. 




Snow removal on Middlesex Avenue. 



Tree Division (658-2809) 

The Tree Division carried out all regular maintenance work such as trimming, 
cutting, spraying and tree removal. We removed 70 roadside trees that were 
dead or interfered with public safety. Hornet nests were removed upon request 
from residents. The Town Common was illuminated again this year with a fine 
display of Christmas lights. 

Dutch Elm Disease; We removed 11 Dutch Elm diseased trees. 



Mosguito Control: The town is a member of the Central Massachusetts Mosquito 
Control Project. With this regional approach we are able to provide our town 
with good, environmentally sound and cost effective mosquito control. The 
three basic mosquito control methods are source reduction, larviciding and 
adult iciding. 



-90- 



Cemetery Division (658-3901) 



All regular maintenance work was carried out throughout the year, such as 
mowing grass, weeding, trimming, resetting grave markers, foundations for 
monuments were poured, etc. 



Burials 

Died in Wilmington 
Died Elsewhere 
Non-Residents 
Cremations 
Infants 



Reserve 



32 
64 
46 
18 
_4 
164 



Receipts 

Interments 
Foundations for 

monuments 
Copy of Deeds 



Trust Fund 



$40,525.00 
$ 3,491.50 

S 129.00 

$44,145.50 



Sale of Lots 



$53,683.00 Perpetual Care $60,498.00 
TOTAL $158,326.50 




Parks 6 Grounds 
Division 
(658-4481) 

All regular 
maintenance was 
carried out 
throughout the 
year such as 
cutting grass, 
trimming shrubs, 
marking 
ballfields for 
baseball, 
Softball, 
football, field 
hockey and 
soccer. Also, 
all fields and 
parks were 
fertilized. 

The Boutwell 
School tennis 
courts and 
basketball court 
has been 

upgraded by applying a binder course and finish course of hot top. I hope to 
seal the courts in FY97. 



DPW workers trim trees on the Town Common. 



The Wildwood School parking lot on the east side of the school was enlarged t 
accommodate teachers' vehicles. This now allows for a better and safer 
traffic flow. 



A new water fountain was installed on the Town Common, 
accessible to disabled individuals. 



The new fountain is 



Engineering Division (658-4499) 

The Engineering Division assisted town departments, boards and commissions 
with engineering related projects, such as, but not limited to: 

Highway Division: With the layout and construction specifications for 
sidewalks and with solutions to drainage problems and other engineering 
related work. 



-91- 



Planning Board & Conservation Conuniasion: Reviewed subdivision plans and made 
recommendations to the Planning Board and inspected subdivision roadway 
construction. 



Household Rubbish Collection. Disposal Land Recycling f 658-4481^: 

The responsibility for overseeing the contract for household rubbish and 
recycling is a function of the Department of Public Works. If homeowners have 
any questions or complaints, please call the above number. 

I am pleased to report that the townwide residential curbside recycling 
program is a great success. The homeowners should be congratulated for their 
participation in this program. Keep up the good workl 



Water & Sewer Department (658-4711) 



Water; The wells located at Salem Street, Town Park, and Chestnut #1 were 
cleaned and rehabilitated. The wells were taken off line and surged with acid 
to remove mineral deposits which inhibit pumping capacity. 

The granular activated carbon (GAC) was replaced in the filters at the 
Butter's Row Water Treatment Plant. This filter media removes any off tastes 
or odors that may be present in ground water. 

A contract was awarded to SEA Consultants to do a townwide hydraulic analysis 
and master plan of the water system. This report will recommend improvements 
that will rectify the problem areas in the system and give us an approximate 
cost of these improvements. 

A feasibility study was completed to review our options for treating water 
from the Shawsheen Avenue well field. The report indicated the best 
alternative would be to install a raw water main from Shawsheen Avenue to the 
Butter's Row Water Treatment Plant via the railroad right-of-way. This will 
increase the system's capacity by 700,000 gallons per day, which will enable 
us to meet peak demand. 

The Departments 10,000 gallon underground fuel storage tank was removed. The 
tank was in very good condition and was located inside a concrete vault. The 
Department of Environmental Protection asked us to remove this antiquated tank 
before any problems with leakage occurred. 

A new valve cheunber and altitude valve was installed at the Nassau Avenue 
Storage Tank. 

During the spring months, a comprehensive water main flushing and valve 
exercising program was performed. This prograun aids in removing sediments in 
the water mains, identifies which fire hydrants need repair and helps ensure 
that the water gates in the system remain in good working condition. Needed 
repairs on the identified broken hydrants and water gates are also performed 
during this time period. 

The Department maintains and repairs all water mains, services, hydrants, 
valves, storage tanks, pumping stations and water treatment facilities in the 
town. In addition, the Department removes the snow around fire hydrants and 
assists the Highway Department with roadway snow removal. 

The water rate for 1995 remains at $2.83 per 100 cubic feet of water used. One 
hundred cubic feet of water is equal to 748 gallons. 

Pumping Statistics; 

Maximum Gallons Per Day 4,020,000 

Maximum Gallons Per Week 26,421,500 

Maximum Gallons Per Month 112,725,100 

Average Gallons Per Day 2,502,569 

Average Gallons Per Month 81,493,400 

Total Gallons Per Year (Treated) 977,920,800 

Total Gallons Per Year (Raw) 1,132,742,400 



-92- 



Precipitation Statistics; 



Annual Rain Fall (Inches) 
Annual Snow Fall (Inches) 

Consumption Statistics; 

Municipal Use (Gallons) 
Percentage of Total Pumped 
Residential Use (Gallons)* 
Percentage of Total Pumped 
Industrial Use (Gallons) 
Percentage of Total Pumped 
Total Metered Use (Gallons)** 
Percentage of Total Pumped 
Unaccounted for Use (Gallons) 
Percentage of Total Pumped 



36.25" 
50.75" 



5,472,779 
01% 

519,879,560 
53% 

291,466,061 
30% 

816,818,400 
84% 

161,102,400 
16% 



* Residential use includes all residences and small commercial users using 

5/8 inch meters. 

** The difference between water pumped and water metered represents 

unaccounted for water use and consists of water used for flushing mains, 
main breaks, fighting fires, street sweeping, etc. 

Water Distribution System; 

The following new water mains were constructed in 1994: 



Location 


Length 


Size 


Hydrai 


Buc)cingham and Revere 


650' 


8" 


3 


Wabash Road 


500' 


8" 


1 


Acorn Drive 


350' 


8" 


2 


Nottinghoun Drive 


1,100' 


8" 


2 


Apache Way Extension 


180' 


8" 


1 


Wakefield Street 


200' 


8" 





Buckingham Street Ext. 


630' 


8" 


3 



A total of 3,610 feet of 8" water main was installed in 1995. There were 12 
hydrants and 124 services installed. 

Household Hazardous Waste Collection Day : The Department held a very 
successful Hazardous Household Waste Collection Day on November 4, 1995. 
Approximately 550 cars brought hazardous waste to be disposed of. 




A very successful houseful hazardous waste collection day. 



-93- 



Sewer : The Department is aggressively working on reducing the inflow and 
infiltration of ground water into the sewer system. The MWRA assesses the 
town based on flow, so it is in the best interest of the town to reduce 
unnecessary flows to reduce our costs to the MWRA. 

The Route 38 Corridor Sewer Design is almost completed. There will be more 
than one design option presented and a decision will be made on which design 
would be best for the town to construct. The construction of this sewer main 
will coincide with the roadway reconstruction project slated for this area. 

The Water and Sewer Commission has reduced, for the third year in a row, the 
sewer rate. The previous rate was $3.92 per one hundred cubic feet, the new 
rate is $3.11 per hundred cubic feet. 

Sewerage Collection System; 

The following new sewer laterals were constructed in 1995: 

Location Length Size 

Magazine Road 300' 2" forced main 

Reading Avenue 60' 4" gravity main 

Total sewer laterals installed in 1995 were 360 feet. There were 60 sewer 
services connected to the system. 

In concluding my report, I would like to take this opportunity to thank the 
Police Department for keeping the Department of Public Works informed during 
the winter months on the road conditions, between the hours of 3:00 p.m. and 
6:30 a.m. weekdays, weekends and holidays and all various departments for 
their cooperation extended during the year. I would like to thank the Town 
Manager, the Assistant Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen for their 
support throughout the year. Last but not least, the employees of the 
Department of Public Works who made 1995 a very productive year, my sincere 
thanks and appreciation. 




Blowing and drifting snow challenged DPW crews during 1995. 



-94- 



Wilmington Public Schools 



WILMINGTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Reflecting upon this school year which has brought us into 1996, the high 
school is preparing itself for the many upcoming changes brought about by the 
Education Reform Law of 1993. The School Advisory Council along with a 
committee of teachers is investigating the restructuring of our school day for 
the 1997-1998 school year to meet the mandated 990 hours. Those who are 
examining the model schedules have surveyed the staff and are aware of their 
concerns and preferences. Staff members are involved with work on 
restructuring our schedule at Wilmington High School to ensure that our 
academic programs are of the highest quality and meet the standards and 
expectations outlined by the Education Reform Law. 

Curriculum revisions in many areas are also ongoing. The Science, 
Mathematics, English, and Social Studies Departments have been actively 
involved in writing curriculum, examining evaluation and assessment and 
integrating courses between departments. Each area of study is guided by the 
"State Curriculum Frsuneworks" which outline the standards to be met by the 
implementation of the improved curriculums. 

Our school district is still involved in the PALMS (Partnership Advancing the 
Learning in Mathematics and Science) program. We are currently working 
jointly with the Merrimack Education Center and the Collaborative for 
Mathematics and Science Education at Salem State College for continued 
curriculum improvement in Mathematics, Science, and Technology. 

Because of our need to improve the technology at the high school and to better 
schedule our students, we have acquired new computers and have trained several 
members of the Guidance staff to implement the software which will make 
scheduling easier for the 1996-1997 school year. Scheduling will begin early 
spring and will be completed by June, 1996. 

Some of our students are involved in new programs this year. Twelve students 
are working at Winchester Hospital Family Medical Center in a program 
supervised by Mrs. Norma Rushton, our school nurse. These students each have 
a mentor in the high school and are responsible for completing projects 
related to the jobs that they have taken at the Center in Wilmington. They 
will receive course credit for the completion of the project. 

For the first time, Wilmington High School has participated in the National 
Academic Decathlon Contest which was held on November 18, 1995 at Ashland High 
School. We entered the contest with a six member tesun and competed against 18 
other tecims all of which had nine members. Our team did exceptionally well in 
all categories and earned silver medals in both Science and Social Studies. 

The students on our newspaper staff have the opportunity to work with a 
journalist from the Wilmington Advertiser one day every week in order to learn 
some of the finer points of journalism. Many of their articles have been 
published in this newspaper and they are very excited about having the 
experience of working with a journalist. 

Wilmington High School continues to look toward the future in preparing all of 
our students for meaningful and productive opportunities beyond their high 
school careers. 

Science/Health Department 

In 1995 the Wilmington Science Department (6-12) continued to study the 
Massachusetts State Curriculum Frameworks in Science and Technology under the 
aegis of the Merrimack Education Center which is the Northeast PALMS provider. 
The development of a Systemic Plan for the Improvement of Math, Science, and 
Technology was completed and filed with the Department of Education. The plan 
will serve as a blueprint for science curriculum change in the coming year. 

The middle schools have been working with the Glencoe Interactions integrated 
science program which complies with the standards and strands of the State 



-95- 



Frameworks in Science and Technology. The varied science disciplines at the 
high school have worked toward alignment in each curricular area with the new 
state regulations as well. 

There were two appointments in the high school Science Department: Mr. James 
Megyesy became Science/Health Department Chairman (6-12) and Mrs. Dawn Martell 
was appointed to the position of biology teacher to fill a vacancy. 

During 1995 science fairs were conducted at both of the middle schools and at 
the high school. The winner of the high school science fair, Julie Gosse, was 
awarded $500 which was generously donated by Winchester Hospital. Julie went 
on to represent the high school at the 46th Annual Massachusetts State Science 
Fair at MIT and finished in the second place category and was subsequently 
awarded $500 for her accomplishments. 

A team of science students from the high school coached by Mr. John Wood, 
chemistry teacher, competed in the United States Department of Energy Regional 
Science Bowl at Brown University. The team finished in the sixth place 
category in a field of all participating New England secondary schools. 

The Science/Health Department looks forward in 1996 to working toward the 
development of a 6-12 health curriculum which will be guided by the new State 
Health Curriculum Frameworks and toward a more integrated math, science, and 
technology curriculum at the secondary level. 

Business Department 

The courses in the Business Department are designed to develop employable 
skills, knowledge, and competencies necessary for the students to meet the 
challenges of our automated society in business, industry and post secondary 
education. 

Our department is working toward integrating its curriculum to meet the 
requirements of the new State Curriculum Guidelines. Our top priority is to 
upgrade the word processing equipment. We are confident that the new 
initiative concept will help us meet these goals. 

Mathematics Department 

The members of the Mathematics Department are excited about the changes taking 
place in education. All are currently taking courses and attending workshops 
to review new teaching methods. All are making an effort to incorporate 
technology into their classroom. We have two sets of scientific calculators 
and one set of graphing calculators. We have an IBM computer lab and a MAC 
lab. 

The Mathematics Department has chosen a new series of textbooks that fulfill 
the requirements of the education reform and meet the standards of the 
National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. This series was written by the 
University of Chicago after extensive research. These texts will be phased 
in, one course at a time. Much of the work in these texts is done using a 
calculator. College board exams now allow the use of a calculator. The 
higher level courses are now using a graphing calculator. Some sections of 
the college boards also allow the use of a graphing calculator. 

We all look forward to the challenges ahead. The standards and expectations 
for students are rising. We hope that parents will support our endeavors by 
urging your children to meet these new challenges. 

English Department 

A major emphasis of the curriculum of the English Department continues to be 
the teaching of writing. Frecjuently, students in grades 6-12 in all levels of 
English are asked to write in the classroom and for homework. The process 
used in developing writing skills employs prewriting activities such as 
brainstorming and the collection of data. Later, students are instructed in 
the organization of their data through outlining and logical ordering. The 
rough draft of the assignment is often edited by other students and the 
teacher before the final paper is completed. 



-96- 



At the high school, extra help on writing assignments is provided by the 
English Department. Computers in the MAC Lab are available for use by 
students during English classes. Students are encouraged to work on their 
college applications through the English program. Lengthy essays on a variety 
of topics are often required and English teachers can help students focus 
their responses. 

In addition to enrollment in a year long English course, students are 
encouraged to participate in a summer reading program and to enroll in an SAT 
Verbal Review course that reviews test taking procedures and prepares students 
for the exams. 

Again this year students have participated in numerous writing and speaking 
contests at the local, state and national level. Students Elane Tohmc and 
Janette Trickett were prize winners in the VFW "Voice of Democracy" contest 
held in November. 



Home Economics Department 

In September the Preschool classes at the high school were moved to the new 
Early Childhood Learning Center at the Boutwell School. Our students in Child 
Development II continue to assist in the preschool while our Child Development 
III students serve as teaching assistants in the elementary schools. They are 
gaining valuable experience interacting with the preschoolers and elementary 
students which will prepare them for teaching or other careers dealing with 
children. Also, they learn skills that will make them more responsible and 
educated parents. 

It should not be overlooked that while the high school students gain knowledge 
from this program, the children in the preschool and elementary schools have 
more one-on-one interaction with young adults which is ecjually important. 

Social Studies Department 

It is with much sorrow that the Social Studies Department remembers the 
passing of its chairman, Carl Olsson. Carl succumbed to cancer after a three 
year battle. He will surely be missed. Carl leaves behind a legacy of more 
than a quarter century of dedication to the students of Wilmington High 
School. This will not soon be forgotten. 

Throughout the current school year, the department will continue to examine 
its curriculum with an eye to assuring that all offerings conform to the new 
State Curriculum Guidelines. One of our top priorities will be the U.S. 
History offerings, particularly AP History and the college level course. We 
feel that the new "On-site" and "New Initiatives" features of the budget will 
afford the department a challenging opportunity to steer our program toward 
the social studies of the twenty-first century. 



High School Library/Media Center 

In 1994-1995 the school library continued to offer a well-rounded 
materials and research and reading as well as technological resea 
namely NEWSBANK and SIRS RESEARCHER. With the assistance of the 
Department, we were able to add replacement and recent paperback 
filling a long-standing need in the collection. We also acquired 
computer capable of running Windows, so students will for the fir 
able to use that platform in the library. We continue to benefit 
assistance of Mrs. Ernestine Meyer, a senior citizen working part 
the auspices of the Green Thumb program for elderly workers. Our 
next year is to acquire a computer capable of running Windows 95 
of multimedia software for all the departments in the high school. 

Guidance Department 

The Guidance Information System (GIS) is a computerized source of national 
information about four-year and two-year colleges, graduate and professional 
schools, as well as civilian and armed services occupations and sources of 
financial aid. Freshman and sophomore students were provided an opportunity 
to participate in the computerized Career Decision Making System which assists 



selection of 
rch tools, 
Reading 
selections, 

a used 
St time be 

from the 

time under 

goal for 
and a variety 



-97- 



students in making career and educational choices. Juniors and seniors were 
provided an opportunity to explore career and college plans. Students 
received a computerized printout of their information and met with their 
individual counselors to review the results. This service was provided to 
students upon individual request or staff referrals. 

The Guidance Department coordinated and hosted meetings with college 
representatives and students throughout the college application period. We 
prepared and submitted approximately 500 to 600 college application packets. 
Mid-year reports were sent to appropriate colleges as rec[uested at the 
completion of the second term grades. Final transcripts were sent at the end 
of the year to specific colleges and schools for enrolled students. 

The Guidance Department screened a variety of scholarship information and 
contests received during the year from state, national, private, and college 
affiliations. Two booklets of scholarship information were prepared. One was 
located in the Guidance Office and the other in the school library for 
students and staff. All appropriate department heads received information 
pertaining to their specific areas. Students were informed about scholarships 
through daily bulletins, newsletters, and during the two Financial Aid 
Workshops. The department administered all exeuninations related to specific 
scholarship competitions as requested and prepared all the necessary data for 
the annual local scholarships. The counseling staff participated as members 
of the local scholarship committee. 

Surveys were sent to career entry (work-bound) and college-bound students 
during the year for general information and to determine specific needs. All 
seniors completed an end-of-the-year survey for annual guidance report and 
evaluation of services. 

Two Financial Aid Workshops were held. During the December workshop, Carol 
Rubel, Director of Financial Aid at Wheelock College, and Educational Loan 
Officers of Wilmington Shawmut and Medford Savings provided valuable 
information to parents and students. At the January workshop, Anthony DeLuca, 
local accountant, provided additional information and assistance in completing 
the financial aid forms. Florence Athanasia, Chairperson of the Guidance 
Department and Edward Woods, Assistant Principal, presented general and local 
scholarship information to participants during the two workshops. Opportunity 
for questions and answers were provided during both evenings. 

A college information night for college-bound juniors was held in March. The 
meeting provided college-bound juniors and their parents with specific 
directions and information to assist them in the college application process. 
The Guidance Chairperson presented an overview of the important aspects of the 
college application process, identified specific steps in the process, and 
reviewed a junior and senior monthly check list. Following the general 
presentation, students and parents met with the high school counselors for 
specific directions related to the local procedures in the processing of 
college applications. A variety of materials including, "College Admissions: 
A Guide" was disseminated. Two follow-up sessions were provided for all 
potential graduates (spring and fall) for assistance and reinforcement of post 
graduate information. 

1995 Post graduate plans: Four-year college/university 71%; two-year 
college/university 14%; less than two-year 2%; career entry (work-bound) 13%; 
military 1%. 

The Guidance Department received a very generous gift for one year of College 
View from the High School Parent Advisory Committee. College View is an 
interactive communication system which connects high school students to 
college admission offices, information, etc. It currently has a data base of 
3,000 two and four-year colleges, an audio clip, full motion video, direct 
communication with colleges and direct submission of college applications, 
etc. 



-98- 



NORTH AND WEST INTERMEDIATE SCHOOLS 



The School Improvement and Strategic Educational Plans continue to provide 
focus and guiding principles for both the North and West Intermediate Schools. 

Time on learning, collaborative planning and meeting curriculum goals and 
consistent standards for a safe and diverse educational environment have been 
implemented this year. We continue to intensively review our inclusionary 
model for special learners. Student performance, Massachusetts Assessment 
Testing and technology education for the school year are being examined by 
staff, parents and administrators. 

Our School Council and Parent Advisory groups provide, as always, resources 
and programs contributing to our school community and its culture. This 
commitment, their active participation and the partnerships being developed 
through home, school and business add greatly to a positive school community. 
These bridges extend also to our elementary and high school programs. Well 
planned and thoughtful transition programs strengthen and emphasize the 
importance of our young people as they move from childhood to their secondary 
educational experience. 

Professional development opportunities for administration and faculty add to 
an atmosphere of collegiality and growth. A systemwide commitment to the 
Skillful Teacher Course offered by the Research For Better Teaching is 
providing every staff member with an opportunity to enhance their skills and 
share positive practices with one another. Ongoing workshops, study groups, 
graduate courses and teacher initiated grants or presentations are at their 
highest level. As life long learners themselves the professional staff is 
more and more fostering this idea among our young people. 

Both schools continue to share and maintain successful programs such as 
D.A.R.E., Peer Mediation, Marshall's Scholastic Program, Future Science and 
Engineers and enrichment activities with most positive results. Curriculum 
improvements in technology education, media/library, fine arts and health 
awareness highlight the year as exemplified by the wonderful music exchange 
concerts with Holmfirth, England. 

A strong partnership exists between the town's intermediate schools and each 
additionally provides opportunities for student involvement and achievement. 
The West Pride Progrsun builds positive attitudes and responsible action while 
their Business/Career course finished first in the Boston Globe Stock Market 
Competition cunong all middle schools. The students are constant visitors to 
the nearby Boutwell School providing enrichment programs and musical 
performances. North students engage in year long community service projects, 
compete in the Massachusetts Bar Association's Mock Trial and communicate with 
Central America Travelers by way of Maya Quest. As always both schools strive 
to open doors and provide avenues for many rich and varied activities. 

The North and West value the partnerships that are being built with students, 
parents, staff and the community. We gratefully acknowledge the support, 
strength and understanding the community has for its middle school students 
and will continue to provide the best possible education for our young people. 

SHAWSHEEN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

The Shawsheen School continues to focus its students, parents and teachers 
toward themes that strengthen the values of caring and sharing. This year the 
Shawsheen School has as its theme "A Year of Responsibility," whereby the 
school community is asked to focus on taking responsibility for one's actions 
and that there are consequences in life for all actions — good and bad. 
Throughout the school year we will be working with children to promote these 
values in all aspects of their lives. 

Our school population continues to grow, and as of this writing the Shawsheen 
Elementary School is the largest school in the community with new families 
moving in on a regular basis. Class size and classroom space continue to pose 
a challenge to the school community. Quality education is the goal of the 
community and the need for the community to seek ways to reduce class size and 
find additional space for classrooms is very important. 



-99- 



The Shawsheen School Advisory Council has developed its second School 
Improvement Plan that focuses on greater parental involvement in support of 
the school library, classrooms, office, computer instruction and fundraising 
to support computer purchases for the school. 

The strength of the school lies in the support of the parents in the education 
of their children. Parents support the school in a myriad of ways, all of 
them important. One progreun that bears mentioning is our program offering 
computer instruction to every child at the Shawsheen School through a 
completely volunteer program provided for by parents. Parents staff our 
computer lab daily, and under the direction of Mr. Robert Boucher, Grade 5 
Teacher, instruct our children in the use of software that supports the work 
being done in the classroom. 

The Parent Advisory Committee continues to present to the children a program 
rich in diversity. The cooperative efforts of our PAC and its members have 
provided assistance to our teachers in the area of mini-grants and enrichment 
assemblies. We acknowledge the fact that the parents are our partners in 
education and appreciate the ways in which they assist, advise and support our 
efforts. 

The Shawsheen School PAC continues to support the children and the staff of 
the school with a very successful Math-A-Thon fundraising effort. 

On June 18, 1993, the Massachusetts Education Reform Act was signed into law. 
The comprehensive legislation lays the foundation for fundamental changes in 
the way our public schools operate by making sure all students will have to 
pass a state assessment of core competencies in order to receive a high school 
diploma. This legislation also ensures that all students will have access to 
state-of-the-art technologies; that all teachers will integrate challenging 
new curriculum frameworks into their classroom practices; all teachers will 
engage in lifelong professional development in order to maintain their license 
to teach; that all schools will provide their students with more structured 
learning time for academic subjects; and that all schools will have in place a 
comprehensive plan for school improvement, developed with advice from 
teachers, parents and community members. 

Our math, science, social studies and language arts programs and textbooks are 
new. The curricula meets the expectations of the state freumeworks guidelines. 
Our teachers are engaged in a professional development program that enhances 
their abilities in understanding how young children learn. Our teachers are 
working to build greater competence in their teaching skills. We believe that 
a teacher's skill makes a difference in the performance of students, not only 
in their achievement scores on tests, but in their sense of fulfillment in 
school and their feelings of well-being. 

The school community faces many challenges during the coming year, but with 
the continued support of the parents and teachers the Shawsheen Elementary 
School will continue to provide a quality education for all of its children. 

WILDWOOD SCHOOL 

During the past year many physical improvements were made to the Wildwood 
School and its grounds. Returning from their summer vacation, the students 
were pleased to discover an improved play area with better drainage and graded 
fields. Adults were pleased to discover an enlarged parking lot, making the 
school more accessible to parents and visitors, and making daily parking 
easier for the staff. Other renovations include the installation of air 
conditioning in both computer labs, a repaired roof and updated windows on the 
front of the building. 

High enrollments continue to be a concern at the Wildwood School, especially 
in grade four. However, an educational assistant has been hired for each of 
the fourth grades to address this class size issue. An additional fifth grade 
teacher was also hired to reduce class sizes at that level. This addition of 
a fifth grade teacher was made possible by the moving of the kindergarten 
children to the Boutwell School which provided an additional classroom. 
Despite the continuing high enrollment at the Wildwood School, the staff 
continues to provide a quality program for all students. 



-100- 



Each year the Wildwood School conducts a reading incentive program for its 
students at all grade levels. This year the students are enjoying an Olympic 
theme for this popular program. By reading at home, students earn points to 
complete the ten events in the decathlon. Their ultimate goal is to complete 
the decathlon and earn a gold medal. The students enjoyed a special assembly 
to kick-off the program and are looking forward to the closing ceremony late 
in the year at which the gold medals will be awarded to those students who 
reach their goal. The students, parents, and teachers are excited about this 
program. 



As curriculum areas continue to be assessed and improved, committees have been 
formed for all areas. The Social Studies committee studied a variety of 
programs and recommended the adoption of the Silver Burdett Ginn Progreun. 
This adoption began last year but has been extended to include all elementary 
students from kindergarten through grade five. This seune publishing company 
supplies our reading pro greun and the t wo programs are thematica lly linked, 

During the fall, 
our fifth grade 
students 
attended 
Nature' s 
Classroom at a 
new site in 
Freedom, New 
Hampshire. They 
enjoyed the many 
learning 
opportunities 
that had been 
presented during 
this week-long 
environmental 
experience and 
returned filled 
with 

enthusiastic 
excitement . 
This is a 
popular progreun 
each year at all 
of Wilmington's 
elementary 
schools . 

Nature 's Classroom is always popular with Wilmington students. 




The Wildwood School has been the recipient of several grants this year. The 
Lottery Arts Council awarded a grant to our music teacher, Mrs. Toby Simon, 
which supported the attendance of our fourth grade students at the Boston 
Ballet's annual production of the Nutcracker. Due to this grant, the entire 
fourth grade class was able to attend this performance free of charge. In 
addition, the Parent Advisory Council received a grant for the Native American 
performance presented to the students this fall. This program presented the 
students with many insights into the culture of our Native Americans. 

In a continuing effort to support students with academic concerns, the staff 
at the Wildwood School recommended the implementation of a Pupil Assist Team. 
This team of professionals from the school meets periodically to brainstorm 
regarding the development of plans to support students experiencing 
difficulties in school. This practice compliments the inclusionary model 
which assists students in the classroom rather than instructing them 
separately outside the classroom. The classroom teacher, resource room 
teachers, reading specialist, and educational assistants are working together 
to put this method into practice. 

The Parent Advisory Council continues to work closely with the staff and 
students at the Wildwood School to support the entire Wildwood community. It 



-101- 



offers a variety of feunily events, conducts fund raising activities, and 
volunteers for many jobs throughout the school. In addition, the PAC provides 
the students with several enrichment programs during the school year. 

The Wildwood School Council is implementing a school improvement plan which 
was shaped by the responses from a survey distributed to both parents and 
staff last year. This year's school improvement plan recommends the following 
actions: 

- establishing a teacher and parent reference section of the 
library 

- seeking contributions of quality children's literature for 
the library 

- exploring alternate voting sites for future elections 

- working cooperatively with the D.P.W. to improve the playground 

- hiring an additional grade five teacher 

- transferring a teacher from grade four to grade three 

- hiring educational assistants to address high enrollments 

- eliminating morning recess to comply with state mandated 
time and learning regulations 

- supporting technology with additional software purchases 

- purchasing homework organizers for the students 

- expanding the use of the Writing Workshop progreun in our 
classroom 

- establishing a school-wide P.R.I.D.E. prograun 

The P.R.I.D.E program is being organized by the school council and the staff 
at the Wildwood School in order to promote a positive climate and promote 
school and personal pride. The program is a school-wide behavior improvement 
program and its title, P.R.I.D.E., is an acronym for Politeness . 
Responsibility, Integrity, Determination, and Excellence . As the students 
demonstrate these behaviors, they will receive a special certificate embossed 
with the Wildwood insignia. Once a student receives one of these awards he or 
she will place a paper hand at the end of the string of paper hands denoting 
good behavior that will be winding its way down the school corridor. Our goal 
will be to have this string of hands go from one end of the school to the 
other. This will become a visible record of the pride we hope to instill in 
our students. We want students to be proud of themselves when they exhibit 
exemplary behavior and proud of their school. 

During the holiday season our students were involved in several programs to 
help those who are less fortunate. One program was the collecting of items 
that were donated to the food pantry. The students brought a variety of items 
that were collected in the foyer. By the time these items were delivered to 
the food pantry, the foyer was filled. In addition, many gifts were collected 
and donated to the Pediatric Unit at New England Pediatric Care Facility in 
Billerica. 

WOBURN STREET SCHOOL 

The Woburn Street School students were immersed in a variety of educational 
and exciting programs, projects and events this past year. 

A sampling of these interesting educational and enjoyable experiences are as 
follows: Art Works, Grade One Puppets, Special Education and Reform, Title 
One and its invaluable services, Reading and the Development of Literacy, 
Media Center and Parent Involvement and Music Appreciation. 

We begin with Art Works. The teacher, Mrs. Larrabee has taken her students to 
new heights in exploring the value and enjoyment of art. Grade One children 
made earth clay pinch pots, which were glazed and fired in the kiln at the 
high school. We owe a debt of thanks to Marie Shack, head of the Art 
Department for doing the firing. The Second Grade children made clay slab 
mobiles. Grade Five teachers, Mrs. Woods, Mrs. Caruso, Mrs. Murray and Mr. 
Mirisola's students were featured in different aspects of the project. Mrs. 
Woods' boys and girls worked on parf echos-"Rawhide" poaches; Mrs. Caruso's 
class - Rawhide Spirit Shields; Mrs. Murray's students worked on Woodland 
Tribes Quill Work on small boxes; Mr. Mirisola's students did Mimbres Pottery. 
Two students, Lauren Nikodemos, grade four, and Colleen Miller, grade five, 
received special awards for their achievements. Miss Nikodemos received a 



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seventy-five dollar Savings Bond from Reading Municipal Light Company from its 
annual T-shirt Electrical Safety Theme Contest. On another note, Mrs. Karen 
Larrabee has received grant money from Wilmington School/Business Partnership 
to study pre-historic Southwest Art — Pictoglypho and Petroglyps. 

Puppets on Woburn Street: The first grades at the Woburn Street School are 
now in the third pre-primer entitled Morning Bells . One of their favorite 
stories is "Maria's Puppet." As a follow-up activity, each child will be 
given a puppet-making project to do at home. In the past, this project has 
been well received, and a variety of fine puppets have been created. 

On January 17, 1996, a puppet presentation was given by Ms. Judith O'Hare, an 
accomplished puppeteer and puppet maker. On February 2 and 8, she brought her 
magic to individual classrooms where students learned the "how" and "why" 
puppets come alive. 

Inclusionary Prograun: This year, the special education staff has worked on 
providing more assistance to classroom teachers and reducing the number of 
Core Education referrals. This has partially been provided through the 
Inclusionary Program. In addition, the pre-referral process was reviewed, 
improved upon, and presented to the entire Woburn Street staff through a 
workshop. As a result of this workshop, a team of classroom teachers and 
specialists was formed to aid teachers in providing classroom modifications to 
meet the needs of individuals and of the entire class. The staff members who 
were involved in these changes included Mrs. Jean Burke, Mrs. MaryAnn Ablove, 
Mrs. Joanne Miles, Mrs. Kim Maggio and Mr. Jack Fahey. 

Title I Progrcun: The Title I program at the Woburn Street School is a 
federally funded preventative reading program servicing grades one through 
three. The Title I teacher works as an inclusionary teacher in five 
classrooms including two first grades, two second grades and one third grade. 
She works with the classroom teachers to provide supportive reading services 
every day for 45 minute periods in each classroom. 

The Title I teacher works with a selected group of 5-6 children designated as 
her Title I population, or she may work flexibly with others in the class by 
circulating the room to offer assistance or by working with the whole group in 
a cooperative teaching situation. As the Woburn Street School is a Title I 
school, the Title I teacher also provides services to other teachers in the 
building as a reading consultant sharing methods or materials as needed. 

The Woburn Street School has been involved in numerous activities related to 
the development of literacy. In November, Woburn Street children, parents and 
staff celebrated Children's Book Week by sharing favorite books. Booklists 
having new children's titles were available for parents from the International 
Reading Association. In the winter, fifth graders participated in the Annual 
Woburn Street School Spelling Bee. The school champion went on to represent 
the school at the Northern Middlesex Spelling Bee. In the Spring, five fifth 
graders represented the school at the Young Authors' conference sponsored by 
the Greater Boston Reading Council at Pine Manor College. These children had 
an opportunity to attend sessions with authors and illustrators as well as 
share their own literary works. At the end of the school year, a literacy 
fair was held. All students had displayed their original works. There were a 
variety of forms to enjoy. Throughout the year, language arts activities are 
coordinated with themes in the curriculum. For example, in grade one students 
studied the weather in science, read stories and poems about the weather, and 
wrote class books and poems related to weather activities. In grade five, 
students studied explorers and ecosystems. They read related fiction and 
nonfiction and did a variety of forms of writing. A guest speaker, Leverett 
Byrd, grandson of Admiral Byrd, explorer of Antarctica, made a presentation 
with slides and artifacts from his grandfather's collection. The person who 
coordinated all this was Chris Bucuvalas, Reading Specialist at the school. 

Woburn Street Library: It has been a productive and exciting year at Woburn 
Street School Library. Parents of a third grade student, Stephanie Carabine, 
have donated an IBM Computer to the Library to be used to automate our Card 
Catalog. Parent volunteers will input the information. Our students have 
been busy using the Electronic Bookshelf program to test their comprehension 
and to record the titles of books that they read. A temporary setback 



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occurred when our tired Apple HE computers broke down. Happily we were able 
to use funds raised at our November Book Fair to purchase a new Macintosh 
Computer for students to use for this popular progrsun. Our second fundraiser 
is a cookbook. "And These Thy Gifts" is a compilation of menus and recipes 
used at Library Volunteer Luncheons through the years. All proceeds from the 
sale of the cookbooks will go to the Technology Fund at Woburn Street School. 

The Woburn Street School was totally involved in community related projects 
throughout the school year. In conjunction with the parents of the school a 
very successful food drive was held collecting various food and household 
products which were delivered to support the Wilmington Food Pantry. Mr. 
Fahey, Guidance Counselor, was very instrumental in the success of the drive. 

Our students again donated $1.00 of their allowances or earned money for the 
holiday collection. These funds were dispersed in the form of gift 
certificates at the local supermarkets to feunilies in need. 

We want to again publicly thank the many parents and friends who donated their 
time and energy to make our school so successful. These volunteers could be 
found in the media center, computer lab, as writing coaches in the classroom, 
and as individual tutors. 

BOUTWELL SCHOOL 

The reopening of the Boutwell School proceeded smoothly this past September. 
The preschool and kindergarten children arrived to a shiny, refurbished 
building with improved lighting, fresh interior and exterior paint, and new 
paving. These welcomed changes to the building were due to the cooperation of 
several town departments. 




The newly refurbished Boutwell School opened its doors in September. 



Almost immediately after the reopening of the Boutwell School, the Parent 
Advisory Council was established. It provides invaluable support to both 
children and staff at the school. PAC members are involved with the following 
projects this year: 

- planning and providing enrichment programs for the students 

- scheduling a variety of feunily activities for evenings and after 
school 

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i 



- scheduling a variety of student activities both at school and 
at other sites 

- organizing and conducting fundraising efforts 

- volunteering to provide classroom assistance for teachers and 
children 

Since its reopening, the Boutwell School has begun to establish a very 
distinct and positive identity of its own. Parents and staff work 
cooperatively to develop the concept of an early childhood center. This 
concept is easily identified at the school and has become very popular. When 
one visits the Boutwell School the atmosphere denotes a place where young 
children develop, learn, and thrive appropriately and happily. 

The change in location for Wilmington's kindergarten children has also brought 
a change in the services of our extended day program. Miss Bunny Kelley, 
director of the Wilmington Extended Day Progreun, has established a satelite 
program at the Boutwell School which kindergarten children may attend before 
and after school. This is an important service for many working parents and 
is extensively utilized. 

The limited budget for the Boutwell 's reopening left a need for many supplies 
and materials that had not been provided. When parents and business leaders 
throughout the community began to realize the needs of the school, they 
responded readily and generously. The donations of supplies and materials 
from parents and businesses has been overwhelming. 

The reopening of the Boutwell School has been both smooth and successful. The 
early childhood center which has been created there has been greeted favorably 
by administrators, staff, parents, children, and the community at large. We 
look forward to its continued success. 

PERFORMING AND FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT 

During this past year, the Performing and Fine Arts Department continued its 
tradition of serving all students in art and music classes in grades 1-8 as 
well as providing a diverse offering for students in grades 9-12, choosing 
from Art, Photography, Ceramics, Band, String Orchestra, Chorus and General 
Music classes., An expanded teaching force has enabled all students at the 
elementary and middle school levels to take art once a week in the 1995-96 
school year. It was heartening for teachers and parents alike to witness the 
pride students displayed in their art work and musical ability throughout this 
year. 

Elementary school students again participated in and won awards in the Reading 
Municipal Light Contest which stresses awareness of the benefits and dangers 
of electricity. Jackie Nikodemis from Woburn Street School was awarded the 
first place prize. North Intermediate School student, Sara Lund's poster 
design combating smoking was chosen as a billboard design seen by Storrow 
Drive commuters. Two students form the Woburn Street School were first and 
second prize winners in the contest, sponsored by the Federal Aviation Agency. 
Once again high school students received prizes at the Boston Globe Scholastic 
Art Award ceremonies with a Gold Key to Kevin Chappie for his hand colored 
photograph. 

Four new display panels for student's art work were purchased through grants 
received from the Wilmington School Business Partnership Foundation and the 
Wilmington High School PAC and monies from Winchester Hospital and the 
Wilmington Cheunber of Commerce. This year both Karen Larrabee and Neal 
Roberts were School/Business Partnership winners allowing them to supplement 
curriculum materials. 

The Art Department has continued to reach out to the Wilmington Community. 
High School students participated in the Chamber of Commerce's Business-to- 
Business Expo providing an art show featuring the theme, "Looking into the 
Future." Karen Larrabee 's fifth grade students exhibited drawings and 
photographs of the Olde Burying Ground at the Town Library. Portfolio class 
students have started an outreach program at Wilmington Woods Senior 



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Residence. Video claeseB meet three to four times a week at the Cablevision 
studios and are in the process of putting a progreun together about the 
curriculum and life at Wilmington High School. 

Our Music Department has had a busy year as well. In preparation for the 
performance season, the High School Band attended our annual Band Camp in 
Meredith, New Hampshire. This year, nine talented eighth grade band members 
were invited to participate with the high school Marching Band. They attended 
a "Subf reshmen" orientation in early August to prepare them for Band Camp and 
the rigors of High School Band performance. 

As a part of continuing community involvement, the High School Band 
represented Wilmington in parades in Woburn, Billerica, Methuen and Andover. 
Proceeds from parade participation enable us to fund our busses to football 
games and Percussion and Color Guard Instructor stipends. In addition to 
"parades for pay, " Wilmington Bands participated in the annual Memorial Day 
Parade in Wilmington and this year were honored to be a part of the 50th 
anniversary Veteran's Day Parade. They also performed at a luncheon for Adra 
Systems Inc. in Bedford and for the grand opening of the Osco Drugs in 
Wilmington. 

The tireless fundraising efforts of Wilmington Band Parents and Friends have 
resulted in the acquisition of much needed equipment and other financial 
assistance. Their biggest effort last year brought the nationally renowned a 
cappella singing group "Beelzebubs" from Tufts University to perform a benefit 
concert in our auditorium. Band parents are currently finishing two hundred 
uniform vests for the Elementary and Middle School bands. If all goes 
according to schedule, our younger bands will be sporting their new look at 
the Memorial Day Parade. Our newest parent support group "Strings Attached 
Parents" has been busy raising funds to support our planned trip to England in 
April. This trip is the second half of a cultural exchange with student 
musicians from Holmfirth, England. Last October during the first half of the 
"British-American Project" approximately sixty British students performed in 
our schools and stayed with Wilmington feunilies for ten days. 




As the first phase of the "British-American Project, " student musicians travelled from 
England to perform in Wilmington's schools. During 1996, Wilmington students will travel to 
England. 



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In our elementary schools, participation in instrumental music performance is 
growing at a staggering rate. Enrollment in instrumental and vocal 
performance classes has increased by twenty percent in our middle schools and 
our high school programs continue to thrive. This fall approximately 110 
elementary band members and their families attended a presentation by the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra at Symphony Hall. Overall interest in music 
participation at all levels is an exciting sign that the Performing Arts are 
alive and well in Wilmington Public Schools. 

Art students have contributed to the musical holiday concerts by providing 
visual decorations and the final band and chorus concert at the high school 
brings together all levels of student work around the high school gym. More 
importantly the children of Wilmington are receiving a comprehensive 
Performing and Fine Arts program learning vocabulary, visual design theories, 
performance skills, great artists of the past and current trends and 
multicultural awareness. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 



The Physical Education Department continued to serve all students (K-12) as 
well as providing an adaptive program for students with special needs. The 
progreun sponsors a physical education "Mile Club" to encourage physical 
fitness in Grades 5 through 8. 

The health program in Grades K-5, under the direction of Mrs. Laura Stinson, 
has incorporated "Project Charlie" into the curriculum. In Grade 5, we offer 
the DARE program, in cooperation with the Wilmington Police Department and 
Officer Chip Bruce. These programs emphasize the importance of drug/alcohol 
education through the teaching of self-esteem, responsibility and decision- 
making. 



The Physical Education Department ci 
achievement in physical education: 

1995 Michele Castronovo 

1996 Thomas Burke 

1997 Keith McLaren 

1998 Daniel Bonnell 



several students for outstanding 

Wes Dunham 
Charisse Thresher 
Melissa Shea 
Cheryl Lee 



Athletic Awards - 1994 - 1995: 

Dr. Gerald Fagan Award - "To The Outstanding Athlete" 
Paul Bruno and Nancy Pote 

Lawrence H. Gushing Award - "To The Senior Athlete Demonstrating Both 
Scholarship and Sportsmanship and Athletic Ability" 
Colleen Stokes and David DeSantis 



Joseph H. Woods, Jr. Award - "To a Senior Three Sport Athlete Who Demonstrates 
Courage, Discipline and Tenacity" - Pat Cahill and Kerri Cassella 

Harold "Ding" Driscoll Award - "To The Senior With the Most Dedication To 
Sports" - Mark DiJulia and Erin Falzone 

George Spanos Award - "For Contribution and Service to W.H.S. Athletics" 
Shirley Barry 

Alumni Award - Recognizes former outstanding student-athletes who have gone on 
and continued to demonstrate their commitment to excellence - 
Judy O'Connell (Class of '90) 

Top "10" Awards - Senior athletes who academically finish in the Top "10" of 
his/her class. 

Rank 1 Colleen Stokes (Tufts University) 

2 Julie Gosse (University of Massachusetts, Amherst) 

3 David DeSantis (Boston College) 

4 Marc DiJulia (Holy Cross) 

5 Seung Won Kim (John Hopkins University) 
8 Robert Pellitier (Assumption College) 

10 Allyson Ward (Villanova University) 



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MVC All Conference Awards: 



Kerry Anderson (Field Hockey) 
Kathaleen Rooney (Field Hockey) 
Leanne Harris (Field Hockey) 
Mary Armata (Soccer) 
Jaime Forgett (Soccer) 
Jacqui Hayden (Soccer) 
Andrew Armata (Soccer) 



Leanne Harris (Basketball) 
Mike Barry (Ice Hockey) 
Greg Young (Winter Track) 
Leanne Harris (Softball) 
Nancy Pote (Softball) 
Greg Young (Spring Track) 








Chicago White Sox pitcher and Wilmington resident Jason Be re joined Joe Bamberg and his father Dan during 
"Joe Bamberg Day" in the Town of Wilmington. 



1995 Girls' and Boys' Basketball teams coached by Jim Tildsley and Jim McCune, 
qualified for the State Tournament. The boys won two Tourneunent games. The 
1995 Ice Hockey Team coached by Steve Scanlon cjualified for the State 
Tournament. The 1995 boys 4x400 relay team coached by Bob Cripps were State 
Class D Cheimpions. Greg Young set the Merrimack Valley Conference record in 
the 600 yard dash. He was voted to the MVC All Conference Team as well as 
being neuned to the Boston Herald All Scholastic Team. In the Spring Track, 
4x440 relay teeun of Tim Peterson, Joe Martiniello, Kevin Kacamburas and Greg 
Young were again State Class D Champions. Greg Young won the State Class D in 
the 800 yd. event as well as being named MVC All Conference and the Lowell Sun 
All Star Team. The 1995 Girls Field Hockey Team coached by Maureen Noone 
qualified for the State Tournament. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

During the last calendar year the Special Education Department received 168 
referrals for initial TEAM evaluations and provided special education and 
related treatment services to approximately 557 special needs students ages 3- 
22. 



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The State Department of Education has developed a new Individual Education 
Plan (lEP) for use in all communities in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
The focus of the new lEP is to move towards greater inclusion and involvement 
on the part of the regular education teachers working with special education 
personnel to develop appropriate student educational plans. Representatives 
from the Special Education Department, and the regular education prograun were 
trained by the Department of Education and they in turn provided local 
training to all special education teachers and appropriate regular education 
teachers in each school. Approximately 75 teachers, both regular and special 
education, were trained in the new lEP and the Special Education Department is 
currently implementing the new format effective with the opening of schools 
for the 1995-96 school year. It is anticipated that all special needs 
students will have their new lEP written on the new format by the close of 
schools of the 1995-96 school year. 

The Special Education Department has been involved with the SEEM Special 
Education Collaborative and the other participating communities (Reading, 
North Reading, Lynnfield, Winchester, and Woburn) in a long-term strategic 
planning process. The focus of this process is to develop more efficient 
mechanisms of collaboration among the communities leading to the development 
of enhanced programs for students with significant special education needs. 
The process began in the Spring of 1995, involving the Superintendent of 
Schools and Special Education Administrators of the above communities, and 
will continue through the 1995-96 school year. The ultimate effect for 
Wilmington will be the return of some students currently served in other 
communities to the Wilmington School system and the development of local 
collaborative programs that will enable us to return students from private 
placements helping to reduce transportation costs. 

SCHOOL FOOD SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

Wilmington School Food Service employs 15 full time staff members and 13 part 
time. We are a self-supporting department within the School Department. All 
salaries, including the Director's and Secretary's, food purchases, equipment 
and most maintenance as well as office supplies are paid from student lunch 
participation, reimbursement from Department of Education, catering functions 
such as Pop Warner, National Honor Society Banquets, luncheons, coffee hours. 
Senior Citizen Lunch Program and any other progreims that allow us to cater and 
put these monies back into the program. 

We offer students many lunch choices to encourage participation at a 
reasonable price. We served 257,350 student meals and 17,900 Senior Citizens 
meals this year. 

We once again participated in Framinghcun State College's graduate Intern 
Program by having a student intern study under Wilmington's School Food 
Service Program. It is an enriching experience for all of us. 

We are always striving to improve our services to the students and community 
and are happy to respond to any suggestions and request when possible. 

PERSONNEL 

The following people retired from the Wilmington Public Schools this past 
year: Mr. Salvatore Albano, Special Education Teacher; Mrs. Martha Logan, 
Reading Teacher; Mrs. Winifred Barry, Administrative Assistant to the School 
Business Administrator; Mrs. Shirley Shufelt, Educational Secretary in the 
High School Guidance Office; Mrs. Patricia Gearty, Executive Secretary in the 
High School Office; and Mrs. Catherine Souza, Educational Secretary at the 
Wildwood School. The Wilmington School community wishes to thank these people 
for their many years of dedicated service to the children of Wilmington and 
wish them many happy and healthful retirement years. 

The Wilmington School community was saddened to learn of the death of two 
staff members this past year: Mr. Carl Olsson, Social Studies Department 
Chairperson and Mrs. Mary Lou Ducey, Educational Assistant at the Shawsheen 
School. Mr. Olsson and Mrs. Ducey gave many years of dedicated service to the 
school system and they will be sorely missed. 



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In conclusion, we would like to take this opportunity to extend our 
appreciation to the administrators, teachers, parents, and students who 
contributed their efforts to the Wilmington Public Schools during the 1994- 
1995 school year. A special note of thanks to the many town departments that 
cooperated with the school system in 1995, especially the Public Buildings 
Department with the reopening of the Boutwell School. 

Shawsheen Regional Vocational 
Technical High School District 

School Committee Representatives 

Elected representatives of the Regional School Committee are: Mark Trifiro 
and Peter Russo from Bedford; Kenneth L. Buffum, Vice Chairman and Bernard F. 
Hoar, Secretary, from Billerica; John P. Miller, Chairman and Alfred Verrier 
from Burlington; J. Peter Downing, Treasurer and Patricia W. Meuse from 
Tewksbury; and James M. Gillis and Robert G. Peterson from Wilmington. 

School Committee representation from Bedford and Tewksbury changed during 
1995. 

Anthony R. Mazzone from Bedford decided to retire and not seek re-election. 
Mr. Mazzone represented his community for 18 years as a member of the 
Shawsheen Valley Technical School District Committee. He gave generously of 
his time and expertise. Elected Chairman by his colleagues in 1983, 1984 and 
again in 1985, Mr. Mazzone 's quality public service included his extraordinary 
expertise in performance based budgeting, collective bargaining and capital 
improvements. During the last renovation project in 1990, Mr. Mazzone 
coordinated the construction of eight major contractors. Mr. Mazzone was 
highly regarded for his input in establishing quality vocational/technical 
programs. 

Richard E. Griffin from Tewksbury decided not to seek re-election after 
representing his community for 21 years on the Regional School District 
Committee. As a valued Tewksbury educator for thirty-eight years, having 
spent the past twenty-one as Principal of the John W. Wynn Middle School, Mr. 
Griffin's positive impact at Shawsheen Valley Technical is well documented. 
Due to his leadership, students attending Shawsheen Tech receive a high 
quality academic experience providing them the opportunity to attend the 
college of their choice. By eliminating all study halls, Mr. Griffin ensured 
students receive both a quality high school diploma coupled with a certificate 
of mastery in their chosen vocational/technical profession. Shawsheen 
students are accepted at prestigious schools of higher learning including: 
Boston College, Boston University, Brown University, Syracuse University and 
the University of Massachusetts, among others primarily because of Mr. 
Griffin's passion for quality academic preparation. He served the School 
Committee as Chairman and coordinated the Policy Development Sub-Committee and 
the Curriculum Sub-Committee for many years. 

Shawsheen Valley Technical 's reputation as a leader in vocational/technical 
education was earned in a large way due to the collective thirty-nine years of 
public service donated by Anthony R. Mazzone and Richard E. Griffin. The 
School Committee is honored to dedicate its 1995 Annual Report to these two 
public servants. 

Educational Services Provided 

Shawsheen Valley Technical is one of twenty-five regional vocational technical 
school districts in Massachusetts. Eleven hundred fifty-six high school 
students were enrolled in comprehensive vocational/technical programs in 
October of 1995. The school has experienced a twenty-one percent increase in 
high school enrollment since October of 1992. Over seven hundred adults 
participated in adult education courses, of which three hundred and fifteen 
adults were enrolled in certificate programs. Shawsheen' s comprehensive adult 
education program is the fifth largest in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 



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Two hundred junior high school students participated in the after school 
Career Exploration prograun funded by a grant from the federal government. 



Two hundred seniors graduated in 1995. Ninety-three percent of the graduating 
class either acquired jobs in their chosen profession or pursued higher 
education. Four percent of the seniors joined the armed services. 
Shawsheen's excellent graduation placement statistics continued to be eunong 
the very best in Massachusetts. 

Thirteen area colleges have developed articulation agreements with Shawsheen 
Valley Technical granting students college credit for the work completed 
during high school. Known as the "Tech Prep" program, this unique approach in 
developing career paths for students while in high school, maximizing student 
interest to obtain advanced degrees in emerging technical areas, assures 
students a career educational path that is both relevant and rewarding. 
Industry leaders and educational professionals from throughout the United 
States have applauded Shawsheen Valley Technical 's Tech Prep program and have 
emulated it throughout the nation. 

Committed to Student Interest 



Ninth graders begin their high school years as inquisitive children and leave 
our institution as aspiring adults. We are committed to provide a nurturing 
and challenging high school experience second to none. Upon entering, students 
spend every other week experiencing and exploring fourteen different 
vocational/technical professions. With nineteen different programs to select, 
parents and students select fourteen of nineteen areas they are scheduled to 
explore. Students spend alternate weeks in academic classes. By eliminating 
study halls and providing a challenging eight period school day, students can 
acquire all carnegie unit requirements for entrance into any college of their 
choice. 

By April of their Freshmen year, students select a vocational/technical 
profession they will major in for the next three and a quarter years. If they 
select plumbing or electrical they will earn their fifteen hundred hours 
toward a journeyman's license prior to graduating from high school. If they 
select Cosmetology they will acquire the thousand hours during high school 
needed to take the state excunination. Program offerings range from Health 
Careers to Electronics to Telecommunications to Culinary Arts to Graphic Arts 
to Welding and the public is invited to contact our Guidance Department at 
(508) 667-2111 for a catalog of our diverse program offerings. 

In the fall of their senior year, many students begin employment with local 
companies during their shop week as apprentices or co-op placements. Over two 
hundred and fifty area company business persons serve on Shawsheen's Craft 
Advisory Committees ensuring our curriculum, content and technology is up to 
date. Meeting twice each year with Shawsheen administrators, these local 
business persons are cimong the first to hire graduates from programs they had 
a part in developing. 

A 1992 graduate of Shawsheen Valley Technical was Christopher Botte of 
Wilmington. He majored in Electrical, secured fifteen hundred hours towards 
his journeyman's license prior to graduating from Shawsheen Tech and last year 
received the President's Award from Suffolk University as the college 
sophomore with the highest academic grade point average. While at Shawsheen, 
Christopher's math courses included Algebra I & II, Geometry, Trigonometry and 
Calculus. His Science courses consisted of three laboratory courses: Biology, 
Chemistry and Physics. 

Shawsheen students participate in a wide variety of extracurricular 
activities. From the Honor Society to the School Play to Vocational Clubs of 
America Competitions against other vocational/technical schools in district, 
state and national competitions, Shawsheen's commitment to providing a wide 
range of activities for student development extends well beyond the classroom 
or athletic field. During the past school year, over four hundred and eighty 
Shawsheen students participated in interscholastic athletics and captured 
Commonwealth Athletic Conference championships in Football, Soccer, Cross 
Country and Baseball. The Volleyball, Cross Country, Soccer, Boys' 

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Basketball, Girls' Basketball, Ice Hockey, Softball and Baseball Teeuns all 
qualified for state tournament play. 



Special Activities in 1995 

Many activities took place during 1995 which deserve special recognition: 

* Shawsheen initiated a comprehensive five-year capital budgeting 
plan making significant changes in its data processing 
administrative functions and investing necessary dollars in new 
technology. The VAX 3300/3400 computer was replaced with Compac 
ProSigna server for administrative systems. This allowed 
implementation of a new fund accounting system and new payroll 
system. A Ethernet PC network was installed into all the offices. 

* A direct Tl line and Pentium server was installed for direct 
access to the Internet. Over seventy-five teachers were trained 
on use of the Internet and all administrative and guidance offices 
were hooked up to the Internet. New computer labs with direct 
access to the Internet were installed in the Library, the 
Telecommunications/Computer Science Shop and Business Technology. 

* New Power Macintosh labs were installed in the Technical 
Illustration Shop and in Graphic Arts. 

* Software improvements included; Implementing Microsoft Office 
Professional for word processing, spreadsheet and presentation 
software needs; implemented HP Open View network management 
system; switched many of our Windows 3.1 workstations to Windows 
95; implemented Netmanage's Cheuneleon Software suite of 40 
Internet applications such as mail and calendar management; 
implemented Netscape World Wide Web browsing software. 

* Shawsheen Valley Technical initiated a registered domain on the 
Internet as Shawsheen. tec .ma .us 

* Initiated a new shop entitled Telecommunications/Computer Science 
replacing Data Processing. Area companies including Bay Networks 
of Billerica are working in partnership with Shawsheen to ensure 
curriculum offerings are both relevant and challenging. 

* Examined its Math, Science and Language Arts Curriculums to ensure 
compliance with Curriculum Framework requirements imposed by 
Educational Reform state wide initiative. 

* The Shawsheen Adult Technical Institute graduated its first 
Licensed Practical Nursing Class. Thirty-four of the thirty five 
graduates successfully passed the state exam and all graduates 
secured jobs in the health industry at an average starting salary 
of $16.50 per hour. This tuition program, at no cost to member 
towns, is a prime example of a school-to-work program benefiting 
both the needs of our citizens and the business community. Lahey 
Clinic of Burlington received the annual "Kenneth L. Buffum Award" 
as the employer which had the highest employment of Shawsheen 
graduates. Shawsheen Valley Technical and Lahey Clinic developed 
a unique program to cross-train medical assistants and medical 
secretaries. Staff from Lahey and students from Shawsheen were 
co-trained by staff members from both institutions for this new 
Clinical Technicians Certification. 

* Examples of the numerous community projects completed by Shawsheen 
students are as follows: Electrical and plumbing students assisted 
in the renovation of the Wilmington Community Resource Center in 
Wilmington in cooperation with Winchester Hospital and Wilmington 
Town Officials; Masonry students built an extension to the 
Wilmington Fire Department and constructed the base for the town 
sign erected on the Burlington Town Common; Carpentry students 
constructed information and display booths used at Billerica 's 



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Yankee Doodle celebration, installed shelving at the offices for 
the Billerica Board of Health and constructed park benches for the 
Billerica library; Graphic Arts students printed numerous 
materials for civic and charitable organizations. Each project 
request is evaluated individually and its acceptance as a school 
project is based on whether it will meet our educational 
objectives. All expenses for projects, such as supplies and 
materials, are borne by those requesting the project. Groups or 
citizens interested in eligibility requirements should contact Mr. 
Anthony Bazzinotti, Director of Vocational/Technical Programs, at 
508-667-2111 xl43. 



Mr. Robert Sheehy, an English Teacher serving Shawsheen Valley Technical 
students with compassion and dignity, died unexpectedly during the summer of 
1995. He began his service at Shawsheen Valley Technical in 1980. Students 
lost a great teacher and his colleagues have lost a dear friend. 

Conclusion 

Shawsheen Tech's continued success is a direct result of the support received 
from District Town Administrators, Boards of Selectmen, Finance Committees, 
Town Meetings and citizens. We very much appreciate their cooperation and 
support . 



-113- 



Town Meetings 



WAPIRANT ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION - APRIL 15. 1995 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 



GREETINGS: In the neune of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner 
prescribed in the By-laws of said town, you are hereby directed to notify and 
warn the inhabitants of the town qualified to vote in town affairs to meet and 
assemble at the Town Hall Auditorium (Precincts 1, 2 and 5), and the Wildwood 
School (Precincts 3, 4 and 6), N.B., Saturday the fifteenth day of April, A.D. 
1995 at 9:45 o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10:00 a.m. and 
shall be closed at 8:00 p.m. for the election of Town Officers: 

ARTICLE 1. To bring in your votes on one ballot respectively for the 
following named offices, to wit: Two Selectmen for the terms of Three Years; 
Three Members of the School Committee for the terms of Three Years; One 
Member of the Housing Authority for the term of Three Years; One Member of the 
Redevelopment Authority for the term of Three Years; One Member of the 
Redevelopment Authority for the term of Two Years; One Member of the Regional 
Vocational Technical School Committee for the term of Three Years. 

You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said 
inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington who are qualified to vote on elections 
and town affairs therein to assemble subsequently and meet in the Town Meeting 
at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street, in said Town of Wilmington, on 
Saturday the twenty-second day of April, A.D. 1995 at 10:30 a.m., then and 
there to act on the following articles: 

In accordance with the above Warrant, the election was called by the Town 
Clerk, Kathleen M. Scanlon at the Town Hall and the Assistant Town Clerk, 
Carolyn Kenney at the Wildwood School, and the Warrant as above was read. 

All voting machines were opened and the zero sheets were posted so that the 



candidates could exeunnine them before the polls were opened. The checkers were 
prepared with their voting lists and voter identification cards and everything 
was in readiness at 10:00 a.m. and the Town Clerk declared the polls open. 

The results were as follows: 

SELECTMEN for three years (vote for two) Voted 

Gerald R. Duggan 76 Butters Row (Candidate Re-election) 1,040 

Mark T. Haldane 13 Arlene Avenue 813 

James J. Rooney 47 Towpath Drive 1,459 

Thomas W. Siracusa 5 Elwood Road 698 

Daniel C. Wandell 91 Shawsheen Avenue 1,473 

Others 1 
Blanks 936 

Total 6,420 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE for three years (vote for three) Voted 

Bradford L. Jackson 62 Garden Avenue (Candidate Re-election) 1,587 

Paul R. Palizzolo 6 Safford Street (Candidate Re-election) 1,477 

Judson W. Miller 84 Grove Avenue 1,480 

Others 1 

Blanks 5.085 

Total 9,630 

HOUSING AUTHORITY for three vears (vote for one) Voted 

Dorothy A. Butler 38 Deming Way 1,989 

Blanks 1.221 

Total 3,210 



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REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY for three years Write-in Vote 
(vote for one) 



John Creeth 
Mark Nelson 
Others 
Blanks 
Total 



286 Salem Street 
78 Swain Road 



REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY for two years (unexpired term) 
(vote for one) 

Leo W. Campbell 17 Saint Paul Street 

Others 

Blanks 

Total 

SHAWSHEEN REG/VOC SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMITTEE for three years 
(Vote for one) 



Robert G. Peterson 

Blanks 

Total 



18 Stonehedge Drive 



Voted 

24 

8 

9 

3. 169 
3,210 

Voted 



1,877 
2 

1.331 
3,210 

Voted 



2,193 
1.017 
3,210 



The results of the election were announced at 10:00 p.m. and all the elected 
officers, with the exception of John Creeth, were sworn to the faithful 
performance of their duties by the Town Clerk shortly thereafter. The total 
number of votes cast was 3,210 which included 132 absentee ballots. The total 
number of registered voters is 11,868 of which 27% voted in this town 
election. 

ANNUAL TOV7N MEETING. APRIL 22. 1995 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 

With a quorum present at 11:00 a.m. (151) James Stewart, the Moderator opened 
the meeting with the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag. He then read the names 
of departed town workers, members of committees and boards who had passed away 
during the past year and a moment of silence was observed for those 
individuals and for the victims of the Oklahoma City tragedy. He then 
introduced our newly elected and re-elected town officials and thanked former 
members for their valuable service to the town. He stated he intended to take 
up Articles 1 through 14 in order and then random selection would begin. He 
made reference to various surveys (Rep. Miceli survey and Cable) and also 
handouts concerning Town Meeting articles available in the foyer. 



-115- 



Moderator began reading the Warrant and was interrupted by Michael McCoy, 
Chairman Board of Selectmen "I move that the Moderator dispense with further 
reading of the Warrant and take up and make reference to each article by 
number." Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 2. To hear reports of Committees and act thereon. Motion by 
Michael Caira, "I move that the Town pass over this article." Motion 
seconded and so voted to pass over. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of previous years; or do anything 
in relation thereto. Motion by Michael A. Caira, "I move to pass over this 
article." Motion seconded and so voted to pass over. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in 
anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1995, 
in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, 
and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew 
any notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as 
may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17; or do anything in relation thereto. 



Motion by James J. Rooney, "I move that the Town vote to authorize the 
Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from 
time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year 
beginning July 1, 1995, in accordance with the provisions of General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes therefor, 
payable within one year, and to renew any notes therefor, payable within 
one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of 
less than one year in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 



ARTICLE 5. To see how much money the Town will appropriate for the expenses 
of the town and the salaries of several town officers and departments and 
determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer from 
available funds, or otherwise; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by George W. Hooper of Finance Committee, "I move that the 
several and respective sums as recommended and presented by the Finance 
Committee be raised by taxation or by transfer from available funds and 
appropriated for the purpose set forth in Article 5, each department's 
budget to be taken up and voted on in the order they appear, subject to 
eunendment, and each department's budget not open for reconsideration 
until the entire budget is voted." 

George W. Hooper, Chairman Finance Committee, read their letter to the Town 
Meeting concerning the budget. Representative Jcunes Miceli stated in 
reference to the budget that lottery returns to the town have increased this 
year. 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
Selectmen - Legislative 



17. 



II 



Salaries 
Expenses 
Total 



1,600 
7.350 
8,950 



Selectmen - Elections 



Salaries (p. t . ) 

Expenses 

Total 



10,713 
3.050 
13,763 



Registrars of Voters 



Salaries 
Expenses 

Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 



1,600 
4, 300 



165 
6,065 



-116- 





Finance Committee 

Salaries (p.t.) 

Expenses 

Total 



1,200 
6.056 
7,256 



Town Manager 

Salary - Town Manager 
Other Salaries 
Expenses 

Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 

Town Accountant 

Salary - Town Accountant 
Other Salaries 
Expenses 
Total 

Treasurer /Col lector 

Salary - Treasurer/Collector 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

Furnishings & Ecjuipment 
Total 

Town Clerk 

Salary - Town Clerk 
Other Salaries 
Expenses 

Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 

Board of Assessors 

Salary - Principal Assessor 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

Appraisals, E. D. P. & Inventories 

ATB/Appraisals 

Furnishings & Equipment 

Total 



79,181 
196,988 
46,425 
14.500 
337,094 



57,297 
61,050 
2.020 
120,367 



57,297 
87,356 
26,850 

g 

171, 503 



45,727 
40,469 
2, 100 



88,296 



60,079 
56,836 
40, 600 


10,000 
2.000 
169,515 



Town Counsel 

Personal Services & Expenses 

Permanent Building Committee 
Salaries (p.t. ) 
Expenses 
Total 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



65.000 

1,200 
100 
1,300 

989. 109 



PROTECTION - PERSONS & PROPERTY 
Police Department 
Salary - Chief 
Salary - Deputy Chief 
Salary - Lieutenant 
Salary - Sergeants 
Salary - Patrolmen 
Salary - Clerks 
Salary - Fill- In Costs 
Salary - Paid Holidays 
Salary - Specialist 
Salary - Night Diff. 
Salary - Incentive Pay 
Sick Leave Buyback 
Expenses 

Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 



74, 
59, 

100, 

257, 
1,061, 
62, 

226, 
67, 
10, 
36, 
32, 
13, 

135, 



618 
235 
057 
856 
608 
122 
110 
565 
200 
800 
760 
650 
035 




2,137,616 



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♦Includes 3 patrolmen positions to be filled if crime bill is approved 
25% of salary only to be funded by town 



Fire Department 

Salary - Chief 

Salary - Deputy Chief 

Salary - Lieutenants 

Salary - Privates 

Salary - Dispatch Clerks 

Overtime Costs 

Paid Holidays 

EMT & Incentive Pay 

Fire Alarm Salary 

Sick Leave Buyback 

Expenses 

Furnishings & Equipment 
Total 

Animal Control 
Salaries 

Contract Services 
Total 

TOTAL PROTECTION OF PERSONS S, PROPERTY 

PUBLIC WORKS 

Personal Services 

DPW - Superintendent 
Engineer - Full Time 
Engineer - Part Time 
Highway - Full Time 
Highway - Other Part Time 
Tree - Full Time 
Tree - Overtime 
Parks/Grounds - Full Time 
Parks/Grounds - Part Time 
Parks/Grounds - Overtime 
Cemetery - Full Time 



62,871 
51,953 
212,237 
893,413 
54,896 
150,000 
64,537 
61,600 
10,545 
15,121 
59, 100 
27.000 
1,663,273 



21,577 
6.600 
28, 177 

3.829.066 



74,618 
110,072 

36,568 
786,219 


76, 100 
5,000 
121,020 


12,535 
97,205 



Motion by George W. Hooper, Finance Committee, "I move that the sum of 
$ 97 , 205 be appropriated for Public Works Personal Services Cemetery - 
Full Time; the sum of $ 35 . 000 to be raised by transfer from the Sale of 
Cemetery Lots Account and the sum of $ 15 , 000 to be raised by transfer 
from the Interest - Cemetery Trust Funds and the balance of $ 47 , 205 to 
be raised by taxation." Motion seconded and so voted. 



Cemetery - Part Time 

Cemetery - Overtime 

Snow Si Ice - Ex. Help/O.T. 

Contractual Services 
Engineer 
Highway 

Highway - Repair Town Vehicles 
Tree 

Parks /Grounds 
Cemetery 

Road Machinery - Repair 
Public Street Lights 
Rubbish Collection & Disposal 
Snow & Ice - Repair 
Snow & Ice - Misc. 





6,640 
119.635 
1,445,612 

900 
25, 140 
62, 150 
3,000 
3,353 
4,075 
62,000 
200, 704 
1,292,866 
16,246 
66.000 
1,736,434 



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Materials & Supplies 

Engineer 1,600 

Highway - Expenses 31,500 

Highway - Const. Supplies & Road Improvements 22,600 

Highway - Gas, Oil, Tires (Other) 53,028 

Highway - Gas, Oil, Tires (DPW) 46,623 

Tree 5,895 

Parks/Grounds 27,000 

Cemetery 10,650 

C81M - Expenses 60,796 

Drainage Projects - Expenses 15,000 

Snow & Ice - Sand & Salt 96,665 

Snow & Ice - Tools & Equipment 4.000 

375,357 

Furnishings & Equipment 21,700 

TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 3.579. 103 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 
Board of Health 

Salary - Director 50,554 

Other Salaries (incl. p.t.) 84,935 

Expenses 6,100 

Mental Health 14,581 

Motion by George W. Hooper, "I move that the line item Board of Health 
Mental Health be amended to $14,581, that being the amount recommended 
by the Town Manager." 

Furnishings & Equipment 800 

156,970 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Salaries (p.t.) 3,780 

Expenses 80 

3,860 

Planning & Conservation 

Salary - Director 51,895 

Other Salaries (incl. p.t.) 84,146 

Expenses 10, 190 

146,231 

Building Inspector/Board of Appeals 

Salary - Building Inspector 39,198 

Other Salaries (incl. p.t.) 57,099 

Expenses 3,072 

Furnishings & Equipment 

99,369 

TOTAL COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 406.430 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

Maintenance & Operation 

Salary - Superintendent 67,289 

Other Salaries 1,258,127 

Overtime 21,300 

Heating Fuel 195,067 

Electricity 85,350 

Utilities 61,196 

Expenses 252,708 

Furnishings & Equipment 4, 200 

TOTAL PUBLIC BUILDINGS 1.945.237 



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HUMAN SERVICES 

Veterans Aid & Benefits 

Salary - Part Time Agent 5,500 

Expenses 1,600 

Assistance - Veterans 10. 000 

17, 100 

Library 

Salary - Director 45,964 

Other Salaries (incl. p.t.) 245,992 

M.V.L.C. 23,783 

Expenses 48,902 

Furnishings & Equipment g 

364,641 

Recreation 

Salary - Director 53,415 

Motion by Michael A. Caira, "I move that the line item Recreation 
Salary - Director be amended to $ 53,415 . that being the amount as 
recommended by the Town Manager." Much discussion held on this issue as 
to the need for a Director and for the continuation of a well run 
program. Motion above so voted to restore position. 

Other Salaries (p.t.) 32,720 
Expenses 2 , 700 

88,835 

Elderly Services 

Salary - Director 41,206 
Other Salaries (incl. p.t.) 41,709 
Expenses 33 , 488 

116,403 

Historical Commission 

Salaries (p.t.) 900 
Expenses 900 

1,800 

Commission On Disabilities 

Salaries (p.t.) 500 
Expenses 250 

750 

TOTAL HUMAN SERVICES 589,529 
SCHOOLS 

Wilmington School Department 14,453,348 
Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational 
Technical High School District 1. 583. 509 

TOTAL SCHOOLS 16,036.857 

MATURING DEBT S INTEREST 

Schools 262,497 

Motion by George W. Hooper, Finance Committee, "I move that the sum of 

$ 262 , 497 be appropriated for Maturing Debt and Interest - Schools; 

the sum of $ 13 , 003 to be raised by transfer from Capital Project Closeouts and 

the balance of $ 249 . 494 to be raised by taxation." Motion seconded and so 

voted. 

General Government 384,599 
Sewer 422,874 
Water 952,704 

Motion by George W. Hooper, Finance Committee, "I move that the sum of 
$952 , 704 be appropriated for Maturing Debt & Interest - Water to be 
raised by transfer from Water Department Available Funds with zero to be 
raised by taxation." Motion seconded and so voted. 



-120- 



Interest on Anticipation Notes & 
Authentication Fee & Misc. Debt. 



67,000 



Motion by George W. Hooper, Finance Committee, "I move that the sum of 
S67 , 000 be appropriated for Interest on Anticipation Notes & 
Authentication Fees and Miscellaneous Debt; the sum of $ 4. 998 to be 
raised by transfer from Water Department Available Funds and the balance 
of S 62 . 002 to be raised by taxation." Motion seconded and so voted. 

TOTAL MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 2.089.674 

UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 

Insurance 609,088 



Motion by George W. Hooper, Finance Committee, "I move that the sum of 
S 609 , 088 be appropriated for Unclassified and Reserve - Insurance; the 
sum of 3 85 , 912 to be raised by transfer from Water Department Available 
Funds with the balance of $ 523 , 176 to be raised by taxation. 



Employee Health & Life Insurance 2,045,000 

Motion by George W. Hooper, Finance Committee, "I move that the sum of 
5 2 . 045 , 000 be appropriated for Unclassified and Reserve - Employee 
Health & Life Insurance; the sum of $ 167 , 433 to be raised by transfer 
from Water Department - Available Funds with the balance of $ 1,877, 567 
to be raised by taxation." 



Veteran's Retirement 20,098 
Retirement - Unused Sick Leave 8,360 
Medicare Employer Contribution 93,500 



Motion by George W. Hooper, Finance Committee, "I move that the sum of 
S 93 , 500 be appropriated for Unclassified and Reserve Medicare Employer's 
Contribution; the sum of $ 7 . 499 to be raised by transfer from Water 
Department - Available Funds with the balance of $ 86, 001 to be raised by 
taxation." Motion seconded and so voted. 



Unemployment Payments 





Salary Adjust. & Additional Costs 


300, 514 


Local Trans. /Training Conferences 


6,300 


Out-of-state Travel 


1,000 


Computer Hardware/Software Maintenance 


55, 183 


Microfilm Projects 


1,000 


Annual Audit 


13,900 


Ambulance Billing 


12,000 


Town Report 


6,000 


Hazardous Material Consulting Service 





School Medicaid Billing 


30,000 


Sewer Maintenance 


32,710 


Professional & Technical Services 


20,000 


Reserve Fund 


100,000 



Motion by George W. Hooper, "I move that the item Reserve Fund be 
amended by reducing said line item from $ 122 . 393 to $ 71 . 697 . " Motion 
seconded and so voted. 



TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 3,354,653 
TOTAL MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT 16. 782 . 801 

Voters attending Town Meeting at this point were 229. 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purchase of new and replacement capital equipment, including but 
not limited to the following items, and further to authorize the sale or turn- 
in, if any, and for the use of the department so designated and to determine 
how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer, borrowing or any 
combination thereof: 



-121- 



(a) Police Department 

Replacement of five police cruisers. 



Motion by Daniel C. Wandell, "I move that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of 3 94, 635 for the purchase of five (5) replacement 
police cruisers for the Police Department, and further to authorize the 
sale or turn-in, if any, of said replaced vehicles." 

Finance Committee member, John Doherty, "I move that the previous motion 
be aunended as follows, that the Town vote to raise by taxation and 
appropriate the sum of $ 37 . 846 for the purchase of two (2) replacement 
police cruisers for the Police Department, and further to authorize the 
sale or turn-in, if any, of the said replaced vehicles." Finance 
Committee recommends two cruisers. Discussion was held on the need for 
five cruisers. Chief Stewart stated safety must be the most important 
issue. It is essential cruisers respond as men depend on them for back- 
up. All the replaced cruisers are used as other town vehicles. Amended 
motion defeated and original motion for five cruisers so voted, $ 94 , 635 . 

At this point in meeting, the Moderator recognized Rep. Bruce Tarr who was 
attending the meeting and also Rep. Jaunes Miceli, thanking them for their 
interest. 

(b) Fire Department 

Replacement of Jaws of Life equipment. 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy "I move that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $ 20, OOP for the purchase of Replacement of Jaws 
of Life for the Fire Department and further to authorize the sale or 
turn-in, if any, of said replaced equipment." Finance Committee 
recommended approval. Motion seconded and so voted, $ 20. OOP . 

(c) Fire Department 

Replacement of heavy duty 4x4 pick-up truck. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the Town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $ 17 , 437 for the purchase of one (1) 
replacement heavy duty 4x4 pick-up truck for the Fire Department, and 
further to authorize the sale or turn-in, if any, of said replaced 
vehicles." Finance Committee recommended approval. Motion seconded and 
so voted, $ 17.437 . 

(d) Department of Public Works 
Replacement of two pick-up trucks. 

Motion by Diane M. Allan, "I move that the Town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of S 27 . 502 for the purchase of two (2) 
replacement pick-up trucks for the Department of Public Works, and 
further to authorize the sale or turn in, if any, of said replaced 
vehicles." Finance Committee recommended approval. Motion seconded and 
so voted, $ 27 . 502 . 

(e) Department of Public Works 
Replacement of brush chipper. 

Motion by Jeimes J. Rooney, "I move that the Town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $ 14 , 490 for the purchase of a 
replacement brush chipper for the Department of Public Works and further 
to authorize the sale or turn-in, if any, of said replaced equipment." 
Finance Committee recommended approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
$ 14.490 . 

( f ) School Department 
Replacement of one minivan. 



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Motion by Daniel C. Wandell, "I move that the Town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $ 21 , 588 for the purchase of one (1) 
replacement minivan for the School Department, and further to authorize 
the sale or turn-in, if any, of said replaced vehicle." Finance 
Committee recommended approval. Motion seconded and so voted, $ 21 , 588 . 

(g) Public Buildings Department 

Replacement of van truck with liftgate. 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that the Town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $ 26. 047 for the purchase of one (1) 
replacement van truck with liftgate for the Public Buildings Department, 
and further to authorize the sale or turn-in, if any, of said replaced 
vehicle." Finance Committee recommended approval. Motion seconded and 
so voted, $ 26,047 . 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purchase and installation of a diesel exhaust removal system for 
the Fire Station and to determine how the same shall be raised, whether by 
taxation, transfer, borrowing or any combination thereof; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of $ 34,750 for the purchase and installation of a 
diesel exhaust removal system for the Fire Station which will supplement 
$ 10, OOP in available funds previously appropriated in Fiscal Year 1995. 
Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. Motion seconded 
and so voted, $ 34, 750 . 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purchase and installation of an oil burner at the West 
Intermediate School and to determine how the same shall be raised, whether by 
taxation, transfer, borrowing or any combination thereof; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 

Motion by Diane M. Allan, "I move that the Town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $ 18. 000 for the purchase and 
installation of an oil burner at the West Intermediate School." Finance 
Committee recommended approval of this article. Motion seconded and so 
voted, $ 18, 000 . 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of upgrading town facilities as identified in the town's 
Americans with Disabilities Act Transition Plan on file in the Office of the 
Town Manager, such upgrades to include improvements to the elevator and 
restroom facilities at the Wilmington Memorial Library and the installation of 
handicapped accessible water fountains at the West Intermediate School and to 
determine how the saune shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer, 
borrowing or any combination thereof; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by James J. Rooney, "I move that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $ 20 . 000 for the purpose of upgrading town 
facilities as identified in the town's Americans with Disabilities Act 
Transition Plan on file in the Office of the Town Manager, such upgrades 
to include improvements to the elevator and restroom facilities at the 
Wilmington Memorial Library and the installation of handicapped 
accessible water fountains at the West Intermediate School. Finance 
Committee recommended approval of this article. Motion seconded and so 
voted, $ 20.000 . 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds in 
the Fiscal Year 1995 budget, a sum or sums of money for the operation of 
various town departments and expenses; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael A. Caira, "I move that the Town vote to transfer from 
the Fiscal Year 1995 budget, $ 10. OOP from Public Buildings Fuel Heating; 
$ 40. 000 from Snow and Ice Salaries; and $ 34. PPP from Snow and Ice 
Expenses to the Following FY-1995 accounts: 



-123- 



Town Counsel Contractual Services $ 2,500 

Public Buildings Electric-Town Buildings $10,000 

Veterans Assistance $ 3,000 

Computer Hardware/Software Expenses $ 6,000 

Statutory Charges Tax Title $10,000 

Salary Adjustments & Additional Costs $39,000 

Sewer Maintenance & Repairs $13,500 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. Motion seconded 
and so voted. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money to develop a Comprehensive Facilities Plan, the purpose of which would 
assess the town's current and future needs for municipal and school buildings 
and to determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer, 
borrowing or any combination thereof; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Daniel C. Wandell, "I move that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate by way of transfer from Capital Stabilization Fund the sum 
of $ 40, 000 for the purpose of developing a Comprehensive Facilities 
Plan, the purpose of which would assess the town's current and future 
needs for municipal and school buildings and the Town Manager be and 
hereby is authorized to enter into appropriate contracts for the purpose 
hereof. " 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. Motion seconded 
and so voted Yes 124 No 6. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$ 5 . 000 for the observance of Memorial Day and Veterans Day, and that the 
Moderator appoint a committee who shall arrange and have charge of said 
observances; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that the Town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of S 5 , 000 for the observance of 
Memorial Day and Veterans Day, and that the Moderator appoint a 
committee who shall arrange and have charge of said observances." 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. Motion seconded 
and so voted, $ 5,000 . 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$ 750. 00 each (a total of $2,250) for the purpose of renewing under the 
authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as cunended, the lease 
of: 

a. Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on Main Street for the 
purpose of providing suitable headquarters for the Nee-Ellsworth 
Post 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States; 

b. American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. in Wilmington for the purpose of 
providing suitable headquarters for the Wilmington Post 136 of 
the American Legion; 

c. Marine Corp League in Wilmington for the purpose of providing 
suitable headquarters for the Wilmington Charter; 

or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $ 750.00 each (a total of $2,250) for the purpose 
of renewing under the authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the 
General Laws as funended, the lease of: 

a. Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on Main Street for the 

purpose of providing suitable headquarters for the Nee-Ellsworth 
Post 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States; 



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b. American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. in Wilmington for the purpose of 
providing suitable headquarters for the Wilmington Post 136 of 
the American Legion; 

c. Marine Corp League in Wilmington for the purpose of providing 
suitable headquarters for the Wilmington Charter. 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. Motion seconded and 
so voted, 3 2.250 . 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
and/or the Town Manager to apply for, accept and enter into contracts from 
time to time for the expenditure of any funds, without further appropriation, 
allotted to Wilmington by the United States Federal Government under any 
Federal Grant Program and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts under any State 
Grant Program; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Diane M. Allan, "I move that the Town vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen and/or the Town Manager to apply for, accept and 
enter into contracts from time to time for the expenditure of any funds, 
without further appropriation, allotted to Wilmington by the United 
States Federal Government under any Federal Grant Program and the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts under any State Grant Program." Finance 
Committee recommended approval of this article. Motion seconded and so 
voted. 

ARTICLE 15. (drawn as #24) To see if the Town will accept as Town ways, the 
layout of the following described streets, as recommended by the Planning 
Board and approved by the Board of Selectmen (M. G. L. Ch. 82 as amended) and 
shown on Definitive Subdivision plans approved in accordance with the "Rules 
and Regulations Governing the Subdivision of Land in the Town of Wilmington, 
Massachusetts," and which plans are recorded at the Middlesex North Registry 
of Deeds (M. N. R. D.), copies of which are available in the office of the 
Town Clerk and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by right of eminent 
domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to 
effect the purpose of this Article, and to determine how an appropriation 
shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or otherwise for the purpose of construction of said ways and for 
the payment of any damages from the takings of land and slope easements and 
other easements therefore: 

a. Marion Street - From Marion Street a distance of 975 feet, more or less, 
westerly to Marion Street (unconstructed) as shown on a definitive 
subdivision plan entitled Marion Street II and recorded at the Middlesex 
North Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 170, Plan 98 on September 11, 1989, 
and as shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by H-Star Engineering 
Co., Inc. dated February 1, 1995. 

b. Oquncmit Road - From Scigliano Street a distance of 255 feet, more or 
less, northwesterly to a dead-end as shown on a definitive subdivision 
plan entitled Ogunquit Road, and recorded at the Middlesex North 
Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 183, Plan 67 on November 15, 1993, and as 
shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by William G. Troy and 
Associates dated December 27, 1994. 

c. Madison Road - From Scigliano Street a distance of 315 feet, more or 
less, northwesterly to Parker Street as shown on a definitive 
subdivision plan entitled Madison Road, and recorded at the Middlesex 
North Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 182, Plan 136 on September 27, 1993, 
and as shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by William G. Troy and 
Associates dated December 27, 1994. 

d. Sarafina's Way - From Hopkins Street a distance of 450 feet, more or 
less, southerly through a cul-de-sac as shown on a definitive 
subdivision plan entitled Wilmington Highland Estates, and recorded at 
the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, Land Court Plan 8478H on August 
31, 1993, and as shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by Robert E. 
Anderson, Inc. dated October 20, 1994. 



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e. Amherst Road - From Shawsheen Avenue a distance of 1,500 feet, more or 

less, westerly through a cul-de-sac as shown on a definitive subdivision 
plan entitled Amherst Road, and recorded at the Middlesex North Registry 
of Deeds, Plan Book 169, Plan 132 on July 5, 1989, and as shown on a 
street acceptance plan prepared by David E. Beede, PLS, PE dated 
February 18, 1994. 

or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by James J. Rooney, "I move that the Town accept as town ways, 
the layout of the following described streets, as recommended by the 
Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen (M. G. L. Ch. 82 as 
amended) and shown on Definitive Subdivision plans approved in 
accordance with the "Rules and Regulations Governing the Subdivision of 
Land in the Town of Wilmington, Massachusetts," and which plans are 
recorded at the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds (M. N. R. D.), copies 
of which are on file in the office of the Town Clerk and to authorize 
the Selectmen to take by right of eminent domain such land, slope and 
drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose of 
this Article, and to vote to raise by taxation the sum of $ 100 for the 
purpose of constructing said ways and for the payment of any damages 
from the taking of land and slope easements and other easements 
therefore: 

a. Marion Street - From Marion Street a distance of 975 feet, more or less, 
westerly to Marion Street (unconstructed) as shown on a definitive 
subdivision plan entitled Marion Street II and recorded at the Middlesex 
North Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 170, Plan 98 on September 11, 1989, 
and as shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by H-Star Engineering 
Co., Inc. dated February 1, 1995. 

b. Sarafina's Way - From Hopkins Street a distance of 450 feet, more or 
less, southerly through a cul-de-sac as shown on a definitive 
subdivision plan entitled Wilmington Highland Estates, and recorded at 
the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, Land Court Plan 8478H on August 
31, 1993, and as shown on a street acceptance plan prepared by Robert E. 
Anderson, Inc. dated October 20, 1994. 

Planning Board recommended approval. Finance Committee recommended 
approval of this article as amended based upon the recommendation of the 
Planning Board. Alan Altman explained this is the procedural process of 
laying out public ways and no land taking is involved. Motion seconded 
and so voted, $100. 

ARTICLE 16. (drawn as #11) To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of providing senior citizen real 
estate tax payment vouchers for services rendered to the town in accordance 
with a Senior Citizen Tax Work-Off Program to be formulated by the Town 
Manager and subject to the approval of the Board of Selectmen; or do anything 
in relation thereto. 

Motion by Diane M. Allan, "I move that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $ 5 , OOP for the purpose of providing senior 
citizen real estate tax payment vouchers for services rendered to the 
town in accordance with a Senior Citizen Tax Work-Off Program to be 
formulated by the Town Manager and subject to the approval of the Board 
of Selectmen." 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. Mrs. Allan explained 
that this problem would offer qualifying seniors $500 reduction in their real 
estate taxes for work performed. Other towns have successful progrsuns in this 
area. Chelmsford has recently won an award for their program. The town would 
use income and need as a financial guide in this prograun. It would be a 
maximum of ten seniors receiving $5.00 per hour. Insurance and liability was 
discussed and the Town Manager stated that the town would try to put seniors 
in positions where injury would not be a consideration. Motion seconded and 
so voted unanimously, $ 5,000 . 



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ARTICLE 17. (drawn as #3) To see if the Town will vote to establish a 
Revolving Fund in accordance with M. G. L. Chapter 44, Section 53E 1/2 for the 
purpose of receiving monies from the Department of Environmental Protection 
Grant Program to be used for the repair and upgrade of subsurface sewage 
disposal systems under Title 5, and additionally, to receive monies from 
betterments and other loan repayments to the town from property owners 
participating in said Prograun; and further to authorize the Board of Health, 
with the approval of the Town Manager, to administer and expend such funds 
received for the purposes of repairing and upgrading subsurface sewage 
disposal systems under Title 5 in accordance with the regulations promulgated 
by the Department of Environmental Protection; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion by Michael A. Caira, "I move that the Town vote to establish a 
Revolving Fund in accordance with M. G. L. Chapter 44, Section 53E 1/2 
for the purpose of receiving monies from the Department of Environmental 
Protection Grant Program to be used for the repair and upgrade of 
subsurface sewage disposal systems under Title 5, and additionally, to 
receive monies from betterments and other loan repayments to the town 
from property owners participating in said Program; and further to 
authorize the Board of Health, with the approval of the Town Manager, to 
administer and expend such funds received for the purposes of repairing 
and upgrading subsurface sewage disposal systems under Title 5 in 
accordance with the regulations promulgated by the Department of 
Environmental Protection." 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. This article will 
enable the town to accept monies to assist residents who have failed septic 
systems and need financial assistance. It will be supervised by the Board of 
Health and Treasurer office. Motion seconded and so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to accept M. G. L. Chapter 60, 
Section 3C and the provision of law known as Chapter 194 of the Acts of 1986 
and to further authorize the establishment of a Scholarship and/or Educational 
Fund Committee in accordance with the provisions of M. G. L. Chapter 60, 
Section 3C and Chapter 194 of the Acts of 1986; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the Town vote to accept M. G. L. 
Chapter 60, Section 3C and the provision of law known as Chapter 194 of 
the Acts of 1986 and to further authorize the establishment of a 
Scholarship and/or Educational Fund Committee in accordance with the 
provisions of M. G. L. Chapter 60, Section 3C and Chapter 194 of the 
Acts of 1986; or do anything in relation thereto." 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. Mr. Cain yielded his 
time to Mrs. Anne Linehan, who explained this is a scholarship/educational 
fund to assist students and residents can send a check with their taxes made 
out to scholarship fund. Many communities are participating in this program 
with great success. Alan Altman stated money can only be used for 
scholarships. Motion seconded and so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 19. (drawn as #35) To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-laws 
of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised by adding a Section 2A to 
Chapter 5 - Public Regulations to read as follows: 

Section 2A Solid Waste Disposal (Recycling) 

In order to implement a program of recycling in conjunction with the 
regular solid waste collection, residents of every household are 
required to separate recyclable material from the solid waste stream and 
to deposit the material for collection as prescribed by rules and 
regulations as may be established by the Board of Selectmen. 

Recyclable material shall include glass containers, aluminum containers, 
steel containers, newspapers, magazines, number 2 plastic, white goods, 
grass and leaves and any other materials as may from time to time be 
required by the state or federal government or as required by the Board 
of Selectmen. 



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The Selectmen may establish regulations governing the location and 
method for collection of recycling material. 

Failure to separate recyclable material from the solid waste stream may 
result in failure of the solid waste collection contractor to collect 
solid waste from the residence which violates this By-law; 

or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Daniel C. Wandell, "I move that the Town vote to amend the By- 
laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised by adding a 
Section 2A to Chapter 5 - Public Regulations to read as follows: 

Section 2A Solid Waste Disposal (Recycling) 

In order to implement a program of recycling in conjunction with the 
regular solid waste collection, residents of every household are 
required to separate recyclable material from the solid waste stream and 
to deposit the material for collection as prescribed by rules and 
regulations as may be established by the Board of Selectmen. 

Recyclable material shall include glass containers, aluminum containers, 
steel containers, newspapers, magazines, number 2 plastic, white goods, 
grass and leaves and any other materials as may from time to time be 
recpjired by the state or federal government or as rec[uired by the Board 
of Selectmen. 

The Selectmen may establish regulations governing the location and 
method for collection of recycling material. 

Failure to separate recyclable material from the solid waste streeun may 
result in failure of the solid waste collection contractor to collect 
solid waste from the residence which violates this By-law; 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. Jeffrey Miller asked 
if anyone will be inspecting our rubbish. The Town Manager stated that there 
is no intention of inspecting anyone's rubbish but passage of this article 
allows the town to take advantage and receive grant fees regarding solid waste 
collection. Motion seconded and so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 20. (drawn as #24) To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum 
of money for the design and construction of sewers, sewage systems and 
disposal facilities known as the Route 38 Corridor Sewer Project, and to 
authorize the Water and Sewer Commissioners to acquire interests in land 
whether by purchase, eminent domain, gift or otherwise, and to authorize the 
assessment of betterments, all in accordance with General Laws Chapter 297 of 
the Acts of 1958 and all Acts in amendment and in addition thereto and other 
General or Special Laws hereto enabling; to determine whether said funds shall 
be raised by taxation, transfer from available funds, or by borrowing under 
the provisions of General Laws Chapter 44, or by any combination thereof; and 
to authorize the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners and/or the Board of 
Selectmen to apply for any federal and state aid and to receive gifts which 
may be available as contributions to be applied toward the cost of the 
project; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Neil Waisnor, Water and Sewer Commissioner, "I move that the 
Town vote to raise and transfer from Available Funds - Main Street Sewer 
Project the sum of S 50.000 for the purpose of providing engineering 
services for plans, design, layout and specifications for the Route 38 
Corridor Sewer Project." Finance Committee recommended approval of this 
article. Mr. Waisnor stated this approval will enable the design to be 
complete to correspondence with the Route 38 construction project. This 
will effect only business in the area with only two residents households 
being involved. Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 21. (drawn as #14) To see if the Town will vote to participate in a 
Massachusetts Water Resource Authority financial assistance program providing 
for a grant and interest free loan and a sewer rate relief grant all for the 
purpose of funding an infiltration and inflow reduction and sewer system 



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rehabilitation progreun and to authorize the Selectmen and/or Town Manager to 
accept the grants and execute documents relative to the interest free loan as 
may be required; and further to appropriate said funds for engineering 
services, construction or reconstruction of sewers, sewerage systems and 
sewage disposal facilities and appurtenances and determine whether this 
appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 

Motion by Neil Waisnor, "I move that the Town vote to participate in a 
Massachusetts Water Resource Authority financial assistance program 
providing for a grant of $ 34. 500 and an interest free loan of $ 103, 500 
and a sewer rate relief grant of S 182 , 500 all- for the purpose of funding 
an infiltration and inflow reduction and sewer system rehabilitation 
program and to authorize the Selectmen and/or Town Manager to accept the 
grants and execute documents relative to the interest free loan as may 
be required." Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. 
This program, when complete, will minimize sewer flow into MWRA. 
Wilmington's assessment will be less and all on sewer will benefit. 
Motion seconded and so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 22. (drawn as #19) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town 
Manager, in conjunction with the Wilmington Historical Commission, to solicit 
proposals for the use of the Little West School for the purpose of determining 
its best use and to provide the Selectmen with a recommendation for such use 
and further to authorize the Selectmen to lease or authorize the use of such 
property, all in accordance with General Laws Chapter 30B and upon such terms 
and conditions as determined by the Selectmen, and further to authorize the 
town to accept any grant, gift or donation to improve and/or renovate the 
building; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Carolyn Harris, Historical Commission, "I move that the Town 
vote to authorize the Town Manager, in conjunction with the Wilmington 
Historical Commission, to solicit proposals for the use of the Little 
West School for the purpose of determining its best use and to provide 
the Selectmen with a recommendation for such use and further to 
authorize the Selectmen to lease or authorize the use of such property, 
all in accordance with General Laws Chapter 30B and upon such terms and 
conditions as determined by the Selectmen, and further to authorize the 
town to accept any grant, gift or donation to improve and/or renovate 
the building." 

The Town Manager explained this article will enable the town to seek the best 
possible use for this building. Finance Committee recommended approval of 
this article. Motion seconded and so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 23. (drawn as #2) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to grant easements to the New England Telephone and Telegraph 
Company and the Town of Reading Municipal Light Department for the purpose of 
providing for the transmission of intelligence and electricity such easement 
locations being more particularly described below, in, on and over several 
private ways or paper streets and being contiguous to town-owned land and to 
set an administrative fee therefore; location on Mather Street, Walnut Street, 
Polk Street (formerly known as Cedar Street), Sharon Street (formerly known as 
Norfolk Street) and Poplar Street and contiguous to town-owned land described 
on Assessor's Map 6, as Parcels 19A, 35, 36, 37, 44, 46 and 48. Also 
described in Plan Book 26, Plan 36 entitled "Wilmington Gardens Addition, 
Wilmington, MA, owned by Frank W. Coughlin, Scale: 1"=80', Boston, June 12, 
1909, H. A. Millhouse, Civil Engineer" and being known as Lots 128-135, 155- 
161, 187-191, 265-276 and 307-316; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by James J. Rooney, "I move that the Town vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to grant easements to the New England Telephone and 
Telegraph Company and the Town of Reading Municipal Light Department for 
the purpose of providing for the transmission of intelligence and 
electricity such easement locations being more particularly described 
below, in, on and over several private ways or paper streets and being 
contiguous to town-owned land and to set an administrative fee 
therefore; location on Mather Street, Walnut Street, Polk Street 
(formerly known as Cedar Street), Sharon Street (formerly known as 



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Norfolk Street) and Poplar Street and contiguous to town-owned land 
described on Assessor's Map 6, as Parcels 19A, 35, 36, 37, 44, 46 and 
48. Also described in Plan Book 26, Plan 36 entitled 'Wilmington 
Gardens Addition, Wilmington, MA, owned by Frank W. Coughlin, Scale: 
1"=80', Boston, June 12, 1909, H. A. Millhouse, Civil Engineer' and 
being known as Lots 128-135, 155-161, 187-191, 265-276 and 307-316." 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. Motion seconded and 
BO voted Yes 127 No 5. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to grant easements to the New England Telephone and Telegraph Company and the 
Town of Reading Municipal Light Department for the purpose of providing for 
the transmission of intelligence and electricity, such easement locations 
being more particularly described below, in, on and over a certain private way 
or paper street and being contiguous to town-owned land and to set an 
administrative fee therefore; location on Avon Street (also known as 
Washington Road) and contiguous to town land described on Assessors Map 9, 
Parcel 18. Also described in Plan Book 27, Plan 7 entitled, "Wilmington 
Manor, Wilmington, MA, owned by Frank W. Coughlin, Scale: 1"=100', Boston, MA 
September 1909, H. A. Millhouse, Civil Engineer" and being known as Lots 534- 
545; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Daniel C. Wandell, "I move that the Town vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to grant easements to the New England Telephone and 
Telegraph Company and the Town of Reading Municipal Light Department for 
the purpose of providing for the transmission of intelligence and 
electricity, such easement locations being more particularly described 
below, in, on and over a certain private way or paper street and being 
contiguous to town-owned land and to set an administrative fee 
therefore; location on Avon Street (also known as Washington Road) and 
contiguous to town land described on Assessors Map 9, Parcel 18. Also 
described in Plan Book 27, Plan 7 entitled, 'Wilmington Manor, 
Wilmington, MA, owned by Frank W. Coughlin, Scale: 1"=100', Boston, MA 
September 1909, H. A. Millhouse, Civil Engineer' and being known as Lots 
534-545." Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. 
Motion seconded and so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 25. (Drawn as #10) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-laws and the associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by taking the 
following actions: 

(1) Add a new subsection 3.3.5 as follows: 

3.3.5 Multi-f cunily Housing - A building or group of buildings 

containing more than one dwelling unit. Each unit may be 
owned by a separate owner. The term "multi-f eunily housing" 
shall not include accessory apartments, rented rooms, boarding 
houses, hotels, motels, lodging houses, hospital or municipal 
use. 

(2) Amend Section 3.3.1 Single Family Dwelling by adding the phrase 3.3.5 at 
the end of the section. Specifically, the last sentence to be amended 
to read "No more than one building for dwelling purposes shall be 
located upon a lot except as provided pursuant to Subsection 3.3.3, 
3.3.4 and 3.3.5. 

(3) Amend Section 3.8.10 by deleting the phrase Board of Appeals in 
paragraph (b) and substituting the phrase Planning Board. 

(4) Amend Section 5.2.6 Open Space by adding the phrase "in accordance with 
Section 5.2.6.1" after the phrase "a landscape buffer shall be provided" 
and deleting the sentence: Such "landscape buffer" shall be a minimum 
of 20 feet in depth and shall consist of; (1) substantially sight 
impervious evergreen foliage at least 8 feet in height or; (2) planting 
of shrubs and trees complemented by a sight impervious fence of at least 
6 feet, but not more than 8 feet in height or; (3) such other type of 
landscaping as may be required under site plan review. 



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(5) Amend Section 5.2.6.1 Residential landscape buffer by deleting it in its 
entirety and replacing it with the text that follows: 



In the business and industrial districts where a business or industrial 
use abuts a residential district or use, the commercial or industrial 
use shall be set back from the residential district or use consistent 
with the requirements of this by-law. Further, the first twenty feet 
(20') of any setback, measured from the commercial or industrial lot 
line or commercial or industrial zoning line shall be landscaped in the 
following manner: On the parcel boundary line, or in such location as 
may be required by site plan review, the commercial or industrial use 
shall be required to erect a solid panel wooden fence of at least five 
feet but no more than eight feet in height. Further, not closer than 
ten feet from the parcel boundary line, the commercial or industrial use 
shall plant one tree for every twenty feet (20') of common boundary 
length. The exact spacing to be determined under site plan review to 
ensure maximum screening. At the time of planting each tree shall have 
a trunk width (dicuneter) of at least three inches measured at a point 
six inches above grade after planting; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 



Motion by Richard Longo, Planning Board Chairman, "I move that the Town 
vote to amend the Zoning By-laws and the associated zoning map of the 
Town of Wilmington by taking the following actions: Motion reads the 
same as the above article. Finance Committee recommended approval of 
this article. Planning Board recommended approval of this article. 
This article was submitted by the Planning Board as a "housekeeping" 
article to correct provisions that were inconsistent or inadvertently 
omitted from Article 19 of the 1994 Annual Town Meeting Warrant. Motion 
seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 26. (drawn as #28) To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 6.5 
Site Plan Review of the Zoning By-laws of the Town of Wilmington by taking the 
following actions: 

(1) Amend Section 6.5.1 by deleting the phrase in conformity with site plan 
review and substituting the phrase upon site plan review and approval by 
the Planning Board; by adding the phrase changed or to the last sentence 
to read, "No use, including parking, shall be changed or expanded in 
ground coverage, except in conformity with site plan review;" and adding 
the sentence at the end of the paragraph "Prior to issuance of a 
Certificate of Occupancy, all conditions of said Site Plan approval must 
be met . " 

(2) Amend Section 6.5.2.1 by deleting the term Town Engineer and 
substituting the term Planning Board; and by adding a new subsection (d) 
as follows: 

d) Certified list of abutters. 

(3) Amend Section 6.5.2.2 and Section 6.5.2.3 by deleting the term Town 
Engineer and substituting the term Planning Board; by deleting the 
phrase Town Planner, Planning Board and substituting the phrase Town 
Engineer, Fire and Police Departments, Building Inspector. 

(4) Add a new subsection 6.5.2.4 as follows: 

The Planning Board shall hold a public hearing on any complete site plan 
review application within thirty (30) days of its submission. Public 
notice of said hearing shall be given in accordance with the 
requirements of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 40A, Section 11. 

(5) Amend Section 6.5.3 by deleting it in its entirety and replacing it with 
the text that follows: 

Determination by the Planning Board - In considering a site plan the 
Planning Board shall give due consideration to the public hearing 
comments and the reports of the Town Engineer, Police and Fire 



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Departments, Building Inspector, Water and Sewer Commission, Department 
of Public Works, Board of Health and Conservation Commission and to the 
provisions of Subsection 6.5.2.3 (a) through (f). The Planning Board 
shall take action on an application for approval within sixty-six (66) 
days of the submittal to the Planning Board. 

Final action shall consist of (a) approval of the site plan as 
submitted; or (b) approval of the site plan subject to conditions, 
modifications, limitations and safeguards as the Planning Board deems 
appropriate to ensure compliance with the terms of site plan review and 
the provisions of this By-law including, if required, sufficient 
security by bond, money deposit or covenant to secure performance in 
accordance with the site plan; or (c) denial of the application if, in 
the opinion of the Planning Board, the site plan and specifications are 
not adequate to ensure use of the property consistent with all the 
provisions of the By-law. The decision shall specifically state the 
reasons for denial. 

The Planning Board shall notify in writing the Town Engineer, Police and 
Fire Departments, Building Inspector, Water and Sewer Commission, 
Department of Public Works, Board of Health and Conservation Commission 
of its decision. 

(6) Delete Section 6.5.4 in its entirety and replace it with the following: 

The Planning Board shall adopt Site Plan Review Regulations pursuant to 
this chapter which shall: 

1. Further clarify procedures to guide the implementation of this 
By-law; 

2. Include provisions for waivers of any portion of the 
regulations, including filing fees, in such cases where, in the 
opinion of the Planning Board, strict conformity would pose an 
unnecessary hardship to the applicant and provided such waiver 
would not be contrary to the intent of the regulations; 

3. Provide for the assessment of reasonable filing fees to cover 
administrative expenses; 

4. Clarify monitoring responsibilities during construction to 
ensure that conditions of site plan approval are enforced. 

(7) Amend Section 6.5.5 by deleting the phrase for a building permit; 

or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Richard Longo, Planning Board Chairman, "I move, motion reads 
the Scune as the above article." Finance Committee recommended approval 
of this article. Planning Board recommended approval of this article. 
This article was submitted by the Planning Board. The intent of the 
article is to change the Site Plan Review process from an in-house 
administrative process to a public process while maintaining the 
existing, effective coordinated review and tight time frame necessary to 
encourage desired economic development. Ken Miller stated, "this is too 
much control and business cannot do anything to their property. The 
Planning Board Director can sign minor changes. This does not effect 
residential property and posting a bond is the same procedure as 
previously required." Motion seconded and so voted Yes 90 No 18. 

ARTICLE 27. (drawn as #27) To see if the Town will vote to authorize transfer 
of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land owned 
by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Conservation 
Commission. Said parcels are described as Map 8, Parcels 69, 79, 80, 81, 83, 
84, 85 and 88; and Map 9, Parcels 23A, 24, 38, 39, 41 and 42; or do anything 
in relation thereto. 



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Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that the Town vote to authorize 
transfer of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels 
of land owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the 
Conservation Commission. Said parcels are described as Map 8, Parcels 
69, 79, 80, 81, 83, 84, 85 and 88; and Map 9, Parcels 23A, 24, 38, 39, 
41 and 42." Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. 
Planning Board recommended approval of this article. The Planning Board 
supports the recommendation of the Town Manager and Property Review 
Board. Motion seconded and so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 28. (drawn as #22) To see if the Town will vote to authorize transfer 
of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land owned 
by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town 
of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for any 
municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the same, all in 
accordance with the General Laws Chapter 30B; and further that the Selectmen 
be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as 
is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and conditions as shall 
be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the 
By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcels 
and interest are described as Map 44, Parcel 62; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the Town vote to authorize 
transfer of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels 
of land owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the 
Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington, said land having been determined to 
be no longer needed for any municipal purpose, and for the express 
purpose of conveying the same, all in accordance with the General Laws 
Chapter 30B; and further that the Selectmen be and are hereby authorized 
to grant and convey such interest in the land as is owned by the Town of 
Wilmington for a price of not less than $ 3 , 250 and upon such terms and 
conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with 
Chapter 3, Section 16 of the By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington Revised. Said parcels and interest are described as Map 44, 
Parcel 62." 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. Planning Board 
recommended approval of this article. The Planning Board supports the 
recommendation of the Town Manager and Property Review Board. Motion seconded 
and so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 29. (drawn as #25) To see if the Town will vote to authorize transfer 
of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land owned 
by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town 
of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for any 
municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the same, all in 
accordance with the General Laws Chapter 30B; and further that the Selectmen 
be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as 
is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and conditions as shall 
be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the 
By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcels 
and interest are described as Map 40, Parcel 38; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion by Brian J. Stickney, the petitioner, "I move that the Town vote 
to authorize transfer of the care, custody, management and control of 
certain parcels of land owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter 
described to the Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington, said land having 
been determined to be no longer needed for any municipal purpose, and 
for the express purpose of conveying the same, all in accordance with 
the General Laws Chapter 30B; and further that the Selectmen be and are 
hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as is 
owned by the Town of Wilmington for a price of not less than $ 8, 250 , and 
upon such terms and conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen 
in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the By-laws of the 
Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised." Said parcels and 
interest are described as Map 40, Parcel 38. 



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Finance Cotntnittee recommended approval of this article. Planning Board 
recommended approval of this article. Town Manager stated that the land is 
surplus to the needs of the Town. The Planning Board supports the 
recommendation of the Town Manager and Property Review Board. Fair market 
value set by Assessor is $8,250. Motion seconded and so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 30. (drawn as #1) To see if the Town will vote to authorize transfer 
of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land owned 
by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town 
of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for any 
municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the same, all in 
accordance with the General Laws Chapter 30B; and further that the Selectmen 
be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as 
is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such tertns and conditions as shall 
be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the 
By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcels 
and interest are described as Map 69, Parcel 49; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion by Kevin M. Ryan, the petitioner, "I move that the Town vote to 
authorize transfer of the care, custody, management and control of 
certain parcels of land owned by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter 
described to the Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington, said land having 
been determined to be no longer needed for any municipal purpose, and 
for the express purpose of conveying the aame, all in accordance with 
the General Laws Chapter 30B; and further that the Selectmen be and are 
hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as is 
owned by the Town of Wilmington for a price of not less than S 4. 750 and 
upon such terms and conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen 
to include a deed restriction precluding a dwelling from being built on 
this property, in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the By-laws 
of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised." Said parcels and 
interest are described as Map 69, Parcel 49. Finance Committee 
recommended approval of this article. Planning Board recommended 
approval of this article. The Planning Board supports the 
recommendation of the Town Manager and Property Review Board that 
disposition be subject to a deed restriction that no dwellings be 
allowed. Town Manager stated that the land is surplus to the needs of 
the town. Fair market value set by Assessor is $4,750. Motion seconded 
and so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 31. (drawn as #28) To see if the Town will vote to authorize transfer 
of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land owned 
by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town 
of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for any 
municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the same, all in 
accordance with the General Laws Chapter 30B; and further that the Selectmen 
be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as 
is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and conditions as shall 
be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the 
By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcels 
and interest are described as Map 50, Parcel 62; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move to pass over this article." Motion 
seconded and so voted to pass over. 

ARTICLE 32. (drawn as #6) To see if the Town will vote to authorize transfer 
of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land owned 
by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town 
of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for any 
municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the seune, all in 
accordance with the General Laws Chapter 30B; and further that the Selectmen 
be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as 
is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and conditions as shall 
be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the 
By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcels 
and interest are described as Map 50, Parcel 63; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 



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Motion by Christine Ondreicka, 1 Marion Street Ext., "I move to pass 
over this article." Motion seconded and so voted to pass over. 

ARTICLE 33. (drawn as #27) To see if the Town will vote to authorize transfer 
of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land owned 
by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town 
of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for any 
municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the same, all in 
accordance with the General Laws Chapter 30B; and further that the Selectmen 
be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as 
is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and conditions as shall 
be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the 
By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcels 
and interest are described as Map 50, Parcel 65; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion by Michael Caira, Town Manager, "I move to pass over this 
article." Motion seconded and so voted to pass over. 

ARTICLE 34. (drawn as #23) To see if the Town will vote to authorize transfer 
of the care, custody, management and control of certain parcels of land owned 
by the Town of Wilmington hereinafter described to the Selectmen of the Town 
of Wilmington, said land having been determined to be no longer needed for any 
municipal purpose, and for the express purpose of conveying the ssune, all in 
accordance with the General Laws Chapter 308; and further that the Selectmen 
be and are hereby authorized to grant and convey such interest in the land as 
is owned by the Town of Wilmington and upon such terms and conditions as shall 
be determined by the Selectmen in accordance with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the 
By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Revised. Said parcels 
and interest are described as Map 35, Parcel 21; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 



Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move to pass over this article." 
seconded and so voted to pass over. 



Motion 



ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the transfer of the 
care, custody, management and control of a certain parcel of land owned by the 
Town of Wilmington from the Conservation Commission to the Selectmen of the 
Town of Wilmington for the express and exclusive purpose of releasing an 
easement, all as shown on "Plan of Easement in Wilmington, Mass., Owner: Town 
of Wilmington, Dated February 6, 1995, Andover Consultants, Inc.," which plan 
is on file with the Town Clerk and to be recorded in the Middlesex North 
District Registry of Deeds, said parcel being shown on said plan as "Proposed 
Utility Easement" in which Easement certain proposed utilities and 
appurtenances are to be constructed, subject to the approval of the Planning 
Board and Conservation Commission and conditioned upon the foregoing, to 
authorize the Selectmen to release the "Proposed Utility Easement" area, all 
in accordance with M. G. L. Chapter 30B and every other law relating thereto 
and to authorize the Selectmen to petition the Great and General Court for 
legislative approval pursuant to Article 97 of the Amendments to the 
Massachusetts Constitution; and after obtaining all required approvals, to 
transfer said "Proposed Utility Easement" upon such terms and conditions and 
for such consideration, the minimum amount of which is to be set by the Town 
Meeting, all in accordance with the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington; or do 
anything in relation thereto. (Map 54, Parcel 7A) 

Motion by Dick Stuart, "I move that the Town vote to authorize the 
transfer of the care, custody, management and control of a certain 
parcel of land owned by the Town of Wilmington from the Conservation 
Commission to the Selectman of the Town of Wilmington being a portion of 
the approximate 12.7 acres of land comprising the Glen Road Berry Bog so 
called, acqoiired by the town for conservation, open space and 
recreational purposes described in Certificate of Title #10417 recorded 
in the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, being shown as Lot 102 on 
'Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass., February 18, 1972, Dana F. Perkins & 
Sons, Inc., Civil Engineers and Surveyors' for the express and exclusive 
purpose of releasing an easement: provided, however, that the care 
custody, management and control of said parcel shall otherwise remain 
with the Conservation Commission, all as shown on 'Plan of Easement in 

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Wilmington, Mass., Owner: Town of Wilmington dated February 6, 1995, 
Andover Consultants, Inc.,' which plan is on file with the Town Clerk 
and to be recorded in the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, 
said parcel being shown on said plan as 'Proposed Water and Sewer 
Easement' in which Easement certain proposed water and sewer mains are 
to be constructed, subject to the approval of the Planning Board and 
Conservation Commission and conditioned upon the foregoing, to authorize 
the Selectman to release the 'Proposed Water and Sewer Easement' area, 
all in accordance with G.L., Chapter 30B and every other law relating 
thereto and to authorize the Selectman to petition the Great and General 
Court for legislative approval pursuant to Article 97 of the Amendments 
to the Massachusetts Constitution; and after obtaining all required 
approvals, including the approval of the Secretary of Environmental 
Affairs, to transfer said 'Proposed Water and Sewer Easement' and to 
further authorize the Board of Selectman to accept a parcel of land 
containing 62,170 square feet more or less, which land is shown as lot 
41 on a plan entitled 'Plan of Land in Wilmington, MA being a 
subdivision of Lot 1 as shown on Land Court Plan No. 37162B Sheet No. 2' 
dated October 24, 1994, revised February 9, 1995 prepared by Andover 
Consultants, Inc., Scale 1" > 40' and land containing 16.99 acres more 
or less, which land is shown as lot 40 on a plan entitled 'Plan of Land 
in Wilmington, MA being a subdivision of lot 1 as shown on Land Court 
Plan No. 37162B Sheet No. 5' dated October 24, 1994, revised February 9, 
1995 prepared by Andover Consultants, Inc., scale 1"=50', which said 
parcels 41 and 40 shall be held by the Town of Wilmington, acting by and 
through it's Conservation Commission, for open space, conservation, and 
recreational purposes; and, in addition, a conservation restriction to 
be placed over all wetland below elevation 86.0 feet for conservation 
purposes as shown on plans entitled 'Construction and Site Grading Plan, 
White Pines Crossing, Wilmington, MA,' sheets 6,7 and 8, scale l''=40', 
prepared by Andover Consultants, Inc., dated October 24, 1994, revised 
February 9, 1995, all in accordance with the By-laws of the Town of 
Wilmington; and provided further that the costs and expenses of the Town 
of Wilmington relative to the aforesaid easement, recording, legislation 
and approvals shall be reimbursed to the town upon written request." 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. Planning Board 
recommended approval of this article. This article is amended and different 
from original article. Easement is considered surplus to the needs of the 
town. Assessor, Mr. Humphrey "Skip" Moynihan stated value of easement is 
$ 500 . This is keeping with requirements of Chapter SOB. Town Manager stated 
the developer could have gone through the wetlands. This article was 
developed in conjunction with the Conservation Commission and in accordance 
with all regulatory agencies. Lynn Guzinski, Chairman Conservation Commission 
stated developer should be commended. Much discussion held on this article. 
Mr. Hooper, made a motion to move the question. Motion seconded and so voted 
Yes 158 No 15. Vote then taken on Article 35 as amended, motion seconded and 
so voted Yes 170 No 4. 

ARTICLE 36. (drawn as #21) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen and Town Manager to sell to Barbara and Henry Sullivan a 
certain parcel of land, contiguous to property currently owned by them, in 
accordance with Chapter 30B of the General Laws of Massachusetts and upon such 
terms and conditions as shall be determined by the Selectmen in accordance 
with Chapter 3, Section 16 of the By-laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington. Said town-owned parcel and interest are described on Assessors 
Map 94, Parcel 46A containing approximately 3,000 square feet and to set the 
price thereof; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by petitioner, M. Barbara Sullivan, "I move to withdraw this 
article." Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to abandon certain perpetual rights 
and easements on five parcels of land adjacent to Jonspin Road. Said 
perpetual rights and easements are no longer necessary due to a re-design of 
the subdivision relating to such rights and easements. Said easements are 
recorded at Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds Land Registration 
Section as Document No. 62620, and also shown on a subdivision plan of land in 
Wilmington, MA, January 23, 1973 by Dana F. Perkins and Sons, Inc., Civil 



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Engineers and Surveyors, Reading, Lowell, MA, Land Court Case 3984-T; or do 
anything in relation thereto. (Map R-1, Parcels 301, 302, 305, 306A, 306C) 

Motion by Michael Newhouse, "I move that the Tovm vote to abandon 
certain perpetual rights and easements on five parcels of land adjacent 
to Jonspin Road. Said perpetual rights and easements are no longer 
necessary due to a re-design of the subdivision relating to such rights 
and easements. Said easements are recorded at Middlesex North District 
Registry of Deeds Land Registration Section as Document No. 62620, and 
also shown on a subdivision plan of land in Wilmington, MA, January 23, 
1973 by Dana F. Perkins and Sons, Inc., Civil Engineers and Surveyors, 
Reading, Lowell, MA, Land Court Case 3984-T; or do anything in relation 
thereto." (Map R-1, Parcels 301, 302, 305, 306A, 306C) 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. Planning Board 
recommended approval of this article. The easements to be abandoned are of no 
value to the town. This article is a "housekeeping" article to clear up title 
records. Motion seconded and so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 38. (drawn as #17) To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $11,641.88 to reimburse Mary Fuller, widow of former 
Police Officer George Fuller, for the money she paid for her health insurance, 
which the town was obligated to pay under Chapter 32B of the General Laws of 
Massachusetts; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Simon Cutter, Attorney representing Mary Fuller stated he has 
amended sunount due Mrs. Fuller to $ 7 . 761 . 25 . Town Manager stated town 
has no obligation in this matter. Mrs. Fuller has been placed on town 
medical insurance once she applied through the Treasurer's office. 
Finance Committee recommended disapproval. Motion seconded and so voted 
Yes 82 No 77. 

ARTICLE 39. (drawn as #4) To see if the Town will vote to amend the 

Zoning By-laws and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by rezoning 

from Residential 20 (R-20) to General Business (GB) the following described 

premises; 

The land with building thereon, in Wilmington, Middlesex County, MA said 
premises containing 23,097 sq. ft. of land as shown on a plan entitled "Plan 
of Land in Wilmington surveyed by John R. Marshall and Delores Marshall," 
December 1961, H. Kingman Abbott, Surveyor, said plan being recorded in 
Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Plan Book 96, Plan 78A. For our 
title see deed book of Mark P. Breslin and Sharon K. Breslin recorded with 
said Registry in Book 3225, Page 243. The land with buildings thereon in 
Wilmington, MA bounded and described as follows: 

BEGINNING at the intersection of the Southeastern boundary of the land 
of Harley Junior and Eleanor Towle with Lowell Street in said 
Wilmington; 

NORTHERLY, by land of said Towle, one hundred eighty and 12/100 (180.12) 
feet; 

EASTERLY, by land of John R. Marshall, et ux, one hundred thirty-one and 

63/100 (131.63) feet; 
SOUTHERLY, by land of John R. Marshall, one hundred eighty (180) feet; 

and 

WESTERLY, by said Lowell Street, one hundred twenty-five (125) feet to 
the point of the beginning; or do anything in relation thereto. 
(Map 72, Parcel 1) 

Motion by Paul R. Brennan, the petitioner, "I move to withdraw Article 
39 from consideration from this Town Meeting." Motion seconded and so 
voted. 

ARTICLE 40. (drawn as #34) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-laws and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by rezoning from 
Residential 20 (R-20) to Neighborhood Business (NB) the following described 
premises : 



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The land in Wilmington, Middlesex County, Massachusetts bounded and described 
as follows; 

SOUTHERLY, by Concord Street, two hundred forty (240) feet; 
WESTERLY, by the easterly sideline of the B & M Railroad, two hundred 

seventy four (274) feet; 
NORTHERLY, by Lubbers Brook in a meandering course; 

SOUTHERLY, by land now or formerly of Edward T. McLaughlin, Trustee, one 

hundred twenty-five (125) feet; and 
EASTERLY, by land now or formerly of Edward T. McLaughlin, Trustee, one 

hundred fifteen (115) feet to the point of the beginning; 

Said land contains 1.75 acres more or less and is further identified as Parcel 
4 on the Wilmington Assessor's Map 78. For title reference see Middlesex 
North District Registry of Deeds, Book 2954, Page 111; or do anything in 
relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael J. Newhouse, Attorney for Edward T. McLaughlin. "On 
behalf of the petitioner I hereby withdraw the above referenced article 
from Town Meeting, April 22, 1995." Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 41. (drawn as #5) To see if the Town will vote to change the Zoning 
By-laws and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by rezoning from 
Residential 10 (R-10) to General Business (GB) the following described parcel 
of land: 

A certain parcel of land situated in Wilmington, Middlesex County, 
Massachusetts, shown as lots four hundred ninety-three (493) to five hundred 
thirty-four (534) inclusive on a plan entitled "Silver Lake Addition" dated 
September 1920, Robert B. Bellamy, C.E., recorded with Middlesex North 
District Plan Book 42, Plan 73, said lots 493 to 526 are together bounded: 

SOUTHERLY, by several courses on Bridge Lane, together totalling one 

hundred sixty-two (162) feet, more or less; 
WESTERLY, by Hobson Avenue, four hundred forty-three (443) feet, more or 

less; 

NORTHERLY, by Richmond Street, one hundred sixty (160) feet, more or 
less; and 

EASTERLY, by Dewey Avenue, four hundred four (404) feet, more or less. 
And together contain 68,775 square feet more or less. 

Said lots 527 to 534 are together bounded: 

EASTERLY, by Dewey Avenue, one hundred (100) feet; 
SOUTHERLY, by Richmond Street, one hundred sixty (160) feet; 
WESTERLY, by Hobson Avenue, one hundred (100) feet; 
NORTHERLY, by lots 535 and 543 as shown on said plan, one hundred 
sixty (160) feet. 

And together contain 16,000 square feet, according to said plan. For 
petitioner's title see deed of Robert Stevens, Trustee of Eastern Realty 
Trust, dated February 26, 1969 and recorded with Middlesex North 
District Registry of Deeds on Book 1885, Page 477; or do anything in 
relation thereto. (Map 44, Parcels 18 and 19) 



Letter received from petitioner. Chandler Bosworth, rec[uesting withdrawal of 
this article. Motion made and so voted. 

ARTICLE 42. (drawn as #32) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-laws and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to 
rezone from Residential 20 (R-20) to Central Business District (CBD) the 
following described parcel of land: 

A certain parcel of land situated in Wilmington, said county, situated on the 
Southerly side of Lowell Street and being shown as Lot 2B on a plan entitled 
"Plan of Wilmington, Mass." belonging to said petitioner, which plan is dated 
August 29, 1960 and recorded with Middlesex North Registry of Deeds in Book of 
Plans 94, Plan 17A and further bounded and described as follows: 



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NORTHEASTERLY, by Lowell Street ae shown on said plan one hundred ten 
(110) feet; 

SOUTHEASTERLY, by land of owners unknown as shown on said plan three 

hundred eighty-eight and 54/100 (388.54) feet; 
SOUTHWESTERLY, by land now or formerly Yentile, as shown on said plan, 

by two lines respectively, seventy-eight and 82/100 (78.82) feet 

and sixty and 13/100 (60.13) feet; and 
NORTHWESTERLY, by lot 2A, as shown on said plan three hundred fourteen 

and 43/100 (314.43) feet. 

Containing, according to said plan, 40,282.2 8q[uare feet, more or less, 
however otherwise bounded and described; or do anything in relation 
thereto. (Map 39, Parcel lA) 

Motion by Michael McCoy, the petitioner, "Mr. Moderator, I would like to 
funend the main motion as written to read as: I move to amend from R20 
Residence (20) to Central Business (CB) to read as follows, I move to 
see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and associated 
Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone from 
Residential 20 (R20) to General Business (GB) and land as follows to 
description of Article 42, Page 32." 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval of this article as written. The 
Committee would approve based on the recommendation of the Planning Board. 
Planning Board recommended disapproval of rezoning to Central Business (CB). 
The Planning Board recommended approval of rezoning to General Business (GB) . 
The creation of a Central Business (CB) District was intended to foster 
development of a Town Center. The allowed uses and dimensional controls are 
not appropriate nor desirable elsewhere in town. However, the majority of the 
Planning Board supports commercial use as allowed within a General Business 
District for this section of Lowell Street. This end of Lowell Street is 
significantly different in character from the section nearer the Reading town 
line. This parcel is adjacent to a General Industrial district and a General 
Business district on two sides. Mr. McCoy stated he would like rezone to 
establish an upscale restaurant on this location. He stated there is a 
difference between this section of Lowell Street and other end of the street. 
Many residents in the area, spoke both for and against this article. Problems 
of traffic, water and the effect it would have on their homes was the main 
concern. Vote taken on this article was Yes 32 No 98. Article disapproved. 

ARTICLE 43. (drawn as #18) To see if the Town will vote to aunend the Zoning 
By-laws and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by rezoning the 
following parcel of land from Residential 60 (R-60) to Residential 20 (R-20): 

The land with the buildings thereon situated in said Wilmington being shown as 
Lot 2, on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Wilmington, Massachusetts" dated 
July 11, 1960, Northeastern Engineering Associates, Inc., Burlington, 
Massachusetts, Ronald A. Forbes, Land Surveyor, recorded with Middlesex North 
District Deeds, Book of Plans 93, Plan 76 and bounded and described as 
follows: 

SOUTHERLY, by Hopkins Street in two courses, as shown on said plan, 
measuring respectively twenty-six and 62/100 (26.62) feet and 
one hundred seventy-three and 38/100 (173.38) feet; 

WESTERLY, by Lot 3, as shown on said plan, five hundred ninety-seven 
(597) feet; 

NORTHWESTERLY, by land of Delphis E. and Edna L. Tardiff, as shown on 

said plan, one hundred ten (110) feet; and 
NORTHEASTERLY, by Lot 1, as shown on said plan, six hundred forty-nine 

(649) feet. 

Containing 2.22 acres, more or less, according to said plan. The above 
referenced parcel is shown as Parcel 58B on Town of Wilmington, 
Assessor's Map 11. 

For Petitioner's title see deed of A. E. Realty Corporation dated July 24, 
1961 and recorded at Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, Book 1522, 
Page 112; or do anything in relation thereto. 



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Letter received from Attorney Robert G. Peterson representing the petitioner 
requesting withdrawal of this article. Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 44. (drawn as #15) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-laws and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by rezoning the 
following parcel of land from Residential 20 (R-20) to Residential 10 (R-10): 

A certain parcel of land, with the buildings thereon, situated in Wilmington, 
Middlesex County, Massachusetts, and being shown as Lot 1 on a plan entitled 
"Plan of Land in Wilmington, MA., Scale: 1" « 40', July 13, 1964, Owner: NES 
Const., Inc., K. J. Miller, Co., Civil Engineers and Land Surveyors," recorded 
with Middlesex North District Deeds, Plan Book 100, Plan 90, and further 
bounded and described as follows: 

EASTERLY, by Woburn Street, one hundred thirty-seven and 73/100 (137.73) 
feet; 

SOUTHERLY, by part of Lot 2, as shown on said Plan, one hundred twenty 
(120) feet; 

SOUTHWESTERLY, by part of said Lot 2, as shown on said plan, forty-two 

and 42/100 (42.42) feet; 
SOUTHERLY again, by other land of the NES Const. Inc., as shown on said 

plan, two hundred fifty (250) feet; 
WESTERLY, by the same, as shown on said plan, two hundred two and 45/100 

(202.45) feet; and 
NORTHERLY, by land of the Town of Wilmington, as shown on said plan, 

four hundred seventy-one and 28/100 (471.28) feet. 

Said parcel containing 69,391 square feet of land, according to said plan. 
The above referenced parcel is shown as Parcel IJ on Town of Wilmington 
Assessor's Map 87. 

For Petitioner's title see deed of Roy C. Syvertson, Jr. and Madaline F. 
Syvertson dated January 31, 1968 and recorded at Middlesex North District 
Registry of Deeds, Book 1832, Page 451; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval of this article. Planning Board 
recommended disapproval of this article. The proposed rezoning is spot zoning 
as all of the adjacent area is zoned R-20 and is illegal. Mr. Robert 
Williams, 231 Woburn Street, the petitioner spoke on this article, stating 
that he would like his children to have this land to build homes on. They 
cannot afford to buy homes in Wilmington and would like to be near their 
parents. He does not believe this will lessen the value of homes in the area. 
Mr. Williams' daughters also spoke asking Town Meeting to rezone this 
property. Mr. Richard Longo, Chairman of Planning Board spoke against this 
rezoning. This is not good planning. Much discussion followed both for and 
against. Many neighbors spoke in support of Mr. William's article. Residents 
from Marcia Road concerned about water problems and also ledge involved with 
this property spoke against this rezoning. Chris Neville asked if town has 
any liability to residents if there is any deunage to other homes due to this 
rezoning. Attorney Alan Altman, town has no liability. Approval is up to 
Attorney General. Anne Linehan, motion to move the question. Motion to move 
approved. Motion on Article 42 seconded and so voted Yes 142 No. 43. Article 
approved. 

ARTICLE 45. (drawn as #30) To see if the Town will vote to change the Zoning 
By-laws and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by rezoning from 
Residential 60 (R-60) and Residential 20 (R-20) to General Industrial (GI) the 
following described parcel of land: 

That a certain parcel of land situated in Wilmington in the County of 
Middlesex and said Commonwealth of Massachusetts, bounded and described as 
follows: 

SOUTHEASTERLY, by the Northwesterly line of Old Main Street, one hundred 

ninety-one and 20/100 (191.20) feet; 
SOUTHERLY, by land now or formerly of Boston Edison Company, one hundred 

eighty-three and 15/100 (183.15) feet; 
WESTERLY, by land now or formerly of Clarence Spinazola and of Antonio 

Gatta, et al, two hundred eighty and 31/100 (280.31) feet; and 



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NORTHEASTERLY, by said land now or formerly of Antonio Gatta et al, two 
hundred forty-four and 16/100 (244.16) feet; 

All of said boundaries are determined by the Land Court to be located as shown 
on plan 39844-A, drawn by K. J. Miller Co., Inc. Surveyors, dated September 
25, 1976, as modified and approved by the Court, filed in the Land 
Registration Office, a copy of a portion of which is filed with Certificate of 
Title 24459. Being the same premises conveyed to the within grantors by 
Transfer Certificate of Title 24596, Registered in Book 125, Page 391, on 
December 24, 1981; or do anything in relation thereto. (Map 25, Parcel 3) 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. Planning Board 
recommended approval of this article. The best use of this property is 
General Industrial as it abuts industrially zoned land and an electric 
easement with high tension wires, it is not on the main road, and is not 
visible from Route 38. 

Motion by Raymond LePore, "I move that the Town vote to change the 
Zoning By-laws and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by 
rezoning from Residential 60 (R-60) and Residential 20 (R-20) to General 
Industrial (GI) the following described parcel of land: 

That a certain parcel of land situated in Wilmington in the County of 
Middlesex and said Commonwealth of Massachusetts, bounded and described 
as follows: 

SOUTHEASTERLY, by the Northwesterly line of Old Main Street, one hundred 

ninety-one and 20/100 (191.20) feet; 
SOUTHERLY, by land now or formerly of Boston Edison Company, one hundred 

eighty-three and 15/100 (183.15) feet; 
WESTERLY, by land now or formerly of Clarence Spinazola and of Antonio 

Gatta, et al, two hundred eighty and 31/100 (280.31) feet; and 
NORTHEASTERLY, by said land now or formerly of Antonio Gatta et al, two 

hundred forty-four and 16/100 (244.16) feet; 

All of said boundaries are determined by the Land Court to be located as 
shown on plan 39844-A, drawn by K. J. Miller Co., Inc. Surveyors, dated 
September 25, 1976, as modified and approved by the Court, filed in the 
Land Registration Office, a copy of a portion of which is filed with 
Certificate of Title 24459. Being the same premises conveyed to the 
within grantors by Transfer Certificate of Title 24596, Registered in 
Book 125, Page 391, on December 24, 1981; or do anything in relation 
thereto. (Map 25, Parcel 3)" Mr. Lepore stated he would like this land 
to store his equipment on. Right now his trucks are stored all over 
town on the land of friends. He has a septic pumping business in the 
town and has helped the town out with his equipment, for use in repair 
of town ball fields. Mr. Grasso, 885 Main Street spoke he lives in 
this area and is against this rezoning. Much discussion for and against 
this article. Betty Wolfe, 4 Douglas Ave., will this property be used 
as a future dumping site. Mr. LePore stated no. Barbara Sullivan 
stated that the Planning Board needs to address this type of rezoning 
issues when establishing a Master Plan for the town. Motion seconded 
and so voted. Yes 131 No 15. Article is approved. 

ARTICLE 46. (drawn as #9) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-laws and zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to rezone from 
Residential 60 (R-60) to Residential 20 (R-20) that land described as land 
shown on Assessor's Map R-1, Parcels 6C, 6D and 9A and further described as 
follows : 

EASTERLY, by Andover Street four hundred ninety (490) feet; 
NORTHERLY, by land of Robert and Maryann Curtis, six hundred sixteen 
(616) feet; 

WESTERLY, by land of Town of Wilmington Water Department four hundred 

eighty-five (485) feet; 
SOUTHERLY, by land of MacDonald eight hundred and two (802) feet; 
or do anything in relation thereto. 



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Motion by Kenneth Miller, petitioner, "I move that the Town vote to 
amend the Zoning By-laws and zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by 
voting to rezone from Residential 60 (R-60) to Residential 20 (R-20) 
that land described as land shown on Assessor's Map R-1, Parcels 6C, 6D 
and 9A and further described as follows: 

EASTERLY, by Andover Street four hundred ninety (490) feet; 
NORTHERLY, by land of Robert and Maryann Curtis, six hundred sixteen 
(616) feet; 

WESTERLY, by land of Town of Wilmington Water Department four hundred 

eighty-five (485) feet; 
SOUTHERLY, by land of MacDonald eight hundred and two (802) feet; 
or do anything in relation thereto." 

Finance Committee recommended approval of this article. Planning Board 
recommended approval of this article. These parcels are adjacent to an 
R-20 district and the Planning Board supports the rezoning of this group 
of parcels and adjacent parcels to R-20. Kevin McDonald a neighbor of 
Mr. Miller spoke in favor of this article. This is not the same article 
as Mr. Miller had before Town Meeting last year. Motion seconded and 
so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 47. (drawn as #7) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-laws and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by rezoning the 
following parcels of land from Residential 20 (R-20) to Central Business (CB): 

PARCEL ONE; The land in said Wilmington being shown as Lot No. 2 on a plan 
entitled, "Plan of Lots surveyed for Laura J. Taylor Estate, Wilmington, 
Massachusetts, A. N. Eames, Surveyor," recorded with Middlesex North District 
Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 83, Plan 46, bounded and described as follows: 

SOUTHERLY, by Lot 4, as shown on said plan, one hundred (100) feet; 
WESTERLY, by Lot 3, as shown on said plan, one hundred (100) feet; 
NORTHERLY, by Lowell Street, as shown on said plan, one hundred (100) 
feet; 

EASTERLY, by Lot 1, as shown on said plan, one hundred (100) feet. 

Said lot containing 10,000 square feet, according to said plan. The 
above-referenced parcel is shown as Parcel 24B on Town of Wilmington, 
Assessor's Map 71. For Petitioner's title see deed of David E. Thomas 
dated February 22, 1991 and recorded at Middlesex North District 
Registry of Deeds, Book 5486, Page 161. 

PARCEL TWO: The land in said Wilmington being shown as Lot No. 1 on a plan 
entitled, "Plan of Lots surveyed for Laura J. Taylor Estate, Wilmington, 
Massachusetts, A. N. Eeunes, Surveyor," recorded with Middlesex North District 
Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 83, Plan 46, bounded and described as follows: 

SOUTHERLY, by Lot 4, as shown on said plan, one hundred twenty-five 
(125) feet; 

WESTERLY, by Lot 2, as shown on said plan, one hundred (100) feet; 
NORTHERLY, by Lowell Street, and by two lines, as shown on said plan 

totalling forty-four and 73/100 (44.73) feet; 
NORTHEASTERLY, by a curve being the intersection of Lowell Street and 

West Street, one hundred and nine and 61/100 (109.61) feet; and 
EASTERLY, by West Street, as shown on said plan, twenty-eight and 20/100 

(28.20) feet. 

Said lot containing 10,580 square feet, more or less, as shown on said 
plan. The above referenced parcel is shown as Parcel 24A on Town of 
Wilmington, Assessor's Map 71. For Petitioner's title see deed recorded 
at Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds at Book 5486, Page 162; or 
do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Attorney Robert Peterson, "I move that the Town vote to eunend 
the Zoning By-laws and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington 
by rezoning the following parcels of land from Residential 20 (R-20) to 
Neighborhood Business (NB) : Amended Article 



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PARCEL ONE; The land in said Wilmington being shown as Lot No. 2 on a 
plan entitled, "Plan of Lots surveyed for Laura J. Taylor Estate, 
Wilmington, Massachusetts, A.N. Eames, Surveyor," recorded with 
Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 83, Plan 46, 
bounded and described as follows: 

SOUTHERLY, by Lot 4, as shown on said plan, one hundred (100) feet; 
WESTERLY, by Lot 3, as shown on said plan, one hundred (100) feet; 
NORTHERLY, by Lowell Street, as shown on said plan, one hundred (100) 
feet ; 

EASTERLY, by Lot 1, as shown on said plan, one hundred (100) feet. 

Said lot containing 10,000 square feet, according to said plan. The 
above-referenced parcel is shown as Parcel 24B on Town of Wilmington, 
Assessor's Map 71. For Petitioner's title see deed of David E. Thomas 
dated February 22, 1991 and recorded at Middlesex North District 
Registry of Deeds, Book 5486, Page 161. 

Mr. Peterson stated that his client has plans for a professional office 
building. This would not be as disruptive to the area and this rezoning 
is more restrictive. Finance Committee recommended approval if amended 
to General Business (GB) as recommended by the Planning Board. Planning 
Board recommended approval if eunended to rezone to General Business 
(GB). These two lots would comprise one commercial lot at the 
intersection of Route 129 and West Street. This corner of the 
intersection is the only corner not zoned for commercial use. It is not 
a desirable location for a residential dwelling. The majority of the 
Board supported rezoning of the intersection to General Business, 
although members did not support extension of the commercial strip on 
Lowell Street in this area. Planning Board does not have recommendation 
on Neighborhood Business. Many residents of area spoke and 
disapproved. Master Plan should be studied before any other changes 
made in this area of Lowell Street. Motion seconded and voted Yes 33 
No 104. Article is disapproved. 

ARTICLE 48. (drawn as #20) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-laws and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by rezoning the 
following parcel of land from Residential 20 (R-20) to Central Business (CB) : 
The land in said Wilmington being shown as Parcel L on a Plan of Land entitled 
"The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Plan of Land in the Town of Wilmington, 
Middlesex County, taken for highway purposes by the Department of Public 
Works, October 21, 1987, Scale: 40 feet to the inch" which Parcel L is more 
particularly described as follows: 

NORTHERLY, by Lowell Street (Route 129) a total of about two hundred 

thirteen (213) feet; 
EASTERLY, by land now or formerly of David E. Thomas about one hundred 

three (103) feet; 

EASTERLY again, by land now or formerly of Jesse M. Anderson and Anna E. 

Anderson about twenty-five (25) feet; 
SOUTHERLY, by land now or formerly of Jesse M. Anderson and Anna E. 

Anderson about one hundred thirty-eight (138) feet; and 
WESTERLY, by land now or formerly of Peter Q. Tse and Jane L. Tse about 

one hundred forty (140) feet. 

Said Parcel L contains 21,822 feet according to the above referenced 
plan, which is recorded at the Middlesex North District Registry of 
Deeds at Plan Book 162, Plan 88. For Petitioner's title see Middlesex 
North District Registry of Deeds, Book 4310, Page 044. Said parcel is 
shown as Parcel 24C on Town of Wilmington Assessor's Map 71; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Attorney Robert G. Peterson, on behalf of petitioner. "I wish 
to withdraw this from the warrant at the Annual Town Meeting of today's 
date." Motion seconded and so voted. 



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ARTICLE 49. (drawn as #13) To see if the Town will vote to accept as a town 
way, the layout of State Street as recommended by the Planning Board and laid 
out by the Selectmen under the provieione of the law relating to aseessment of 
Betterments, which layout is filed in the Office of the Town Clerk, and which, 
with plans therein mentioned is hereby referred to for more particular 
description; and to authorize the Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain 
such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect 
the purpose of this Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be 
raised, whether by taxation, transfer from available funds, or by borrowing 
under the provisions of Massachusetts General Law Chapter 44, Section 7, or 
otherwise, for the purpose of engineering and construction of said way, and 
for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope 
easements and other easements therefor; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Paul D. Cheney, lA State Street, one of the petitioners, "I 
move that this Article be withdrawn." Motion seconded and so voted to 
withdraw. 

Attendance at Town Meeting was as follows and adjournment took place in the 
early evening at 6:05 P.M. A medical emergency took place at Town Meeting and 
Warren C. Fitzgerald, 44 Cunningham Street was attended to by Wilmington 
Police and Fire Personnel. The Town Meeting was saddened to learn that Mr. 
Fitzgerald died later at Winchester Hospital. 

11:00 A.M. - 151 1:30 P.M. - 229 

3:40 P.M. - 291 Non-Voters - 36 



TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS FY - 1995 

Total By Transfer By Taxation 

Appropriation 

$ 10,000 $ 10,000 $ 

40,000 40,000 

34,000 34,000 

50.000 50.000 g 

$134,000 $134,000 $ 



TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS FY - 1996 



SCHOOL BUDGET $16,036,857.00 $ 16,036,857.00 

MUNICIPAL BUDGET 16,782,801.00 $1,321,549 15,461,252.00 

CAPITAL OUTLAY 294,449.00 294,449.00 

WARRANT ARTICLES 60.111.25 60. 111.25 

TOTAL BUDGET $33,174,218.25 $1,321,549 $ 31,852,669.25 

STATUTORY CHARGES 3.534.563 71.943 

TOTAL $36,708,781.25 $1,393,492 

AVAILABLE FUNDS 

CAPITAL STABILIZATION 40,000 

CEMETERY SALES 35,000 

CEMETERY INTEREST 15,000 

CAPITAL PROJECT CLOSEOUT 13,003 

WATER ANTICIPATED REVENUE 1.290.489 

TOTAL $1,393,492 



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SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - DECEMBER 4. 1995 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



The meeting was called to order by Town Moderator, James Stewart with a quorum 
present of one hundred sixty-one voters (161) at 7; 40 P.M. 

Town Manager, Michael A. Caira, "I move that the Moderator dispense with 
further reading of the Warrant and take up and make reference to each article 
by number." Motion seconded. Articles will be by random draw as prescribed 
by the Town's Inhabitant By-law. 

ARTICLE 1. (drawn as #3) To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate by taxation or transfer from available funds in the Fiscal Year 
1996 budget the additional sum of $ 149, 625 to the Wilmington School 
Department, thereby raising the total appropriation for the operation of the 
Wilmington School Department to $ 14, 602 , 973 ; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion by Diane M. Allan, "I move that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $ 149,625 for the Wilmington School Department." 

Finance Committee recommended approval. Motion seconded and so voted 
unanimously. 

ARTICLE 2. (drawn as #14) To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate by taxation or transfer from available funds in the Fiscal Year 
1996 budget the additional sum of $ 72 . 066 to the Reserve Account, thereby 
increasing the amount appropriated to $ 172 , 066 ; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion by Robert J. Cain, "I move that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $ 72 . 066 to the Reserve Account." Motion 
seconded. 

Finance Committee recommended approval. Town Manager, Michael A. Caira 
explained, this money is available to the town after we have balanced the 
budget. It is in the best interest of the town to put this money in the 
reserve fund, which restricts its use. Motion seconded and so voted, 
unanimously. 

ARTICLE 3. (drawn as #13) To see if the Town will authorize the Town 
Treasurer to establish a Revolving Fund in accordance with M. G. L. Chapter 
44, Section 53E 1/2 for a Compost Bin Recycling Program and further to 
establish a spending limit for said account; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion by Michael V. McCoy, "I move that the Town authorize the Town 
Treasurer to establish a Revolving Fund in accordance with MA General 
Law Chapter 44, Section 53E 1/2 for a compost bin recycling program and 
to transfer all funds accumulated from the sale of compost bins to said 
revolving fund and to authorize the Town Manager or Treasurer to expend 
such funds and further to establish a spending limit of not more than 
$ 4, 500 for said account." 

Finance Committee recommended approval. Selectmen voted to approve this 
article. Seconded and so voted. Yes 132 No 1 

ARTICLE 4. (drawn as #1) To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate from available funds the sum of $ 579 , 260 to the Department of 
Public Works, Chapter 90 Construction Fund Account; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion by James J. Rooney, "I move that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate from Chapter 90 Construction Funds the sum of $ 579 , 260 to 
the Department of Public Works Chapter 90 Construction Fund Account." 
Finance Committee recommended approval. Motion seconded and so voted 
unanimously. 



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ARTICLE 5. (drawn as # 6) To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate by taxation or transfer from available funds in the Fiscal Year 
1996 budget the additional sum of S 40.000 to the Sewer Maintenance Account, 
thereby raising the total appropriation to S 72 , 710 ; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion by Town Manager, Michael A. Caira, "I move that the Town vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of S 40. OOP to the Sewer Maintenance 
Account. " 

Finance Committee recommended approval. Motion seconded and so voted 
unanimously. 

ARTICLE 6. (drawn as #4) To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate by taxation or transfer from available funds in the Fiscal Year 
1996 budget the sum of 3 20. 700 to Maturing Debt and Interest-Sewer for the 
purpose of a loan repayment to the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority for 
the Inflow/Infiltration Program; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Town Manager, Michael A. Caira, "I move that the Town vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $ 20. 700 to Maturing Debt and Interest - 
Sewer Account for the purpose of repaying the first year of a five year 
no-interest loan to the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority for the 
implementation of the Town's Inflow/Infiltration Program." 

Finance Committee recommended approval. Motion seconded and so voted, 
unanimously. 

ARTICLE 7. (drawn as #9) To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of 
money for the design and construction of sewers, sewage systems and disposal 
facilities in Webber Street, starting at Cedar Street and extending 
approximately six hundred feet (600'), more or less, to the property line 
shown on Assessors' Map 30, Parcel 7C and further shown on a plan entitled 
"Webber Street Sewer Project" on file in the office of the Superintendent of 
Water and Sewer and to authorize the Water and Sewer Commission to acquire 
interest in land whether by purchase, gift or eminent domain or otherwise and 
to direct the assessment of one hundred percent (100%) betterments, all in 
accordance with M. G. L. Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1958 and all Acts in 
cunendment or in addition thereto and other general or specific laws thereto 
enabling; to determine whether said funds shall be raised by transfer from 
available funds or by borrowing under provisions of M. G. L. Chapter 44 or by 
any combination thereof; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Noel D. Baratta, of Water and Sewer Commission, "I move that 
the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $ 65 , 000 for the construction of 
sewers, sewage systems and disposal facilities in Webber Street starting 
at Cedar Street and extending approximately six hundred (600') feet more 
or less to the property line shown on Assessors' Map 30, Parcel 7C and 
further shown on a plan entitled "Webber Street Sewer Project" on file 
in the office of the Superintendent of Water and Sewer and to authorize 
the Water and Sewer Commission to acc[uire interest in land by gift and 
to direct the assessment of 100% betterments all in accordance with MA 
General Law Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1958 and all Acts in amendment or 
in addition thereto and other general or specific laws thereto enabling; 
and that said funds shall be raised from Available Funds - Sewer, all to 
be fully reimbursed through the application of 100% betterments." 

Finance Committee recommended approval. Motion by Paul Melaragni, 3203 
Pouliot Place, "I move to pass over this article." Motion seconded. Mr. 
Melaragni spoke representing his parents, Remo and Concetta Melaragni, of 12 
Webber Street. They cannot afford this betterment and do not wish to 
participate in this sewer project. Jim Miceli stated five of the seven 
families on the street expressed interest. This project will enable them to 
tie into sewer, at no cost to the town. It will be 100% financed by 
betterments. Jay Neal, 10 Webber Street also supports the project. Motion to 



-146- 



pass over Yes 90 No 135. Motion fails. Discussion continued. Attorney Alan 
Altman explained that the state has a Betterment Act and if your property 
benefits from the project an abutter must pay his share. James Miceli, motion 
to move the question and end debate. So voted. Vote was then taken on main 
motion. Yes 97 No 138 Motion fails. 

ARTICLE 8. (drawn as #16) To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen to 
convey an easement to the Town of North Reading for the purpose of accessing a 
water treatment plant to be constructed in North Reading over and through a 
certain parcel of town-owned land identified and shown on Assessors' Map 101, 
Parcel 5 and further shown on plan entitled "Plan of Taking for Proposed 
Wellfield in Wilmington, Massachusetts, dated April 9, 1964," a copy of which 
is on file with the Town Clerk; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Daniel C. Wandell, "I move that the Town vote to authorize the 
transfer of the care, custody, management and control of a certain 
parcel of land owned by the Town of Wilmington Water and Sewer 
Department to the Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington for the express 
and exclusive purpose of conveying an easement to the Town of North 
Reading for the purpose of accessing a Water Treatment Plant and 
utilities thereto to be constructed in North Reading over, under and 
through a certain parcel of town-owned land identified and shown on 
Assessor' Map 101, Parcel 5 and further shown on plan entitled 'Plan of 
Taking for Proposed Wellfield in Wilmington, Massachusetts, dated April 
9, 1964, ' a copy of which is on file with the Town Clerk, and further 
authorize the Selectmen to seek any special legislation or approvals 
that may be required to approve the granting of such easement and 
provided further that the cost and expenses of the Town of Wilmington 
relative to the aforesaid easement, recording, legislation and approvals 
shall be reimbursed to the Town by the Town of North Reading upon 
written request of the Board of Selectmen and/or Town Manager." 

Finance Committee recommended approval. This easement is to assist the Town 
of North Reading, all costs will be reimbursed and the Town of North Reading 
will seek special legislation and approval. Accepted as the main motion. 
Motion seconded and so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 9. (drawn as #12) To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen and/or Town Manager to petition the Great and General Court to 
submit legislation for an Act providing group insurance benefits for certain 
surviving spouses of deceased employees or retired employees in the Town of 
Wilmington; such legislation to read as follows: 

Whereas, the deferred operation of this act would tend to defeat its purpose, 
which is to immediately provide for the rights and benefits of certain 
surviving spouses of deceased employees or retired employees in the Town of 
Wilmington, therefor it is hereby declared to be an emergency law, necessary 
for the preservation of the public convenience. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court 
assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows: 

Section 1: Notwithstanding the provisions of Chapter 32B of the General Laws, 
the Town of Wilmington shall be deemed to have accepted Section 9D 1/2 of said 
Chapter 32B. To the limited extent that the town has made contributions to 
group health insurance under said Chapter 32B for surviving spouses of 
deceased employees or retired employees of the Town of Wilmington, prior to 
the effective date of this section, such payments shall be deemed to have been 
made in compliance with said Chapter 32B and as if the town had accepted 
Section 9D or 9D 1/2 as the case may be. 

Section 2: Notwithstanding the provisions of Chapter 32B of the General Laws 
or any other general or special law to the contrary, the Town of Wilmington is 
authorized and directed to pay Mary Fuller, widow of former police officer 
George Fuller, the sum of seven thousand seven hundred sixty-one dollars and 
twenty-five cents ($7,761.25) as authorized by the April 22, 1995 Annual Town 
Meeting appropriation vote on Article 38, to settle the claim and to satisfy 
any moral obligation of the town for group insurance premium contributions 
said Mary Fuller might otherwise have received from the town had she applied 



-147- 



for such group insurance benefits prior to March of 1994; provided that Mary 
Fuller shall execute a written release to the Town of Wilmington for any 
claims she may have relating to group health insurance benefits prior to the 
receipt of any such payment; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Daniel C. Wandell, "I move that the Town vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen and/or Town Manager to petition the Great and General 
Court for the purpose of submitting legislation for an Act providing 
group insurance benefits for certain surviving spouses of deceased 
employees or retired employees in the Town of Wilmington; such 
legislation to read as follows: 

Whereas, the deferred operation of this act would tend to defeat its 
purpose, which is to immediately provide for the rights and benefits of 
certain surviving spouses of deceased employees or retired employees in 
the Town of Wilmington, therefor it is hereby declared to be an 
emergency law, necessary for the preservation of the public convenience. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General 
Court assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows: 

Section 1: Notwithstanding the provisions of Chapter 32B of the General 
Laws, the Town of Wilmington shall deemed to have accepted Section 9D 
1/2 of said Chapter 32B. To the limited extent that the town has made 
contributions to group health insurance under said Chapter 32B for 
surviving spouses of deceased employees or retired employees of the Town 
of Wilmington, prior to the effective date of this section, such 
payments shall be deemed to have been made in compliance with said 
Chapter 32B and as if the town had accepted Section 9D or 9D 1/2 as the 
case may be. 

Section 2: Notwithstanding the provisions of Chapter 32B of the General 
Laws or any other general or special law to the contrary, the Town of 
Wilmington is authorized and directed to pay Mary Fuller, widow of 
former police officer George Fuller, the sum of seven thousand seven 
hundred sixty-one dollars and twenty-five cents ($7,761.25) as 
authorized by the April 22, 1995 Annual Town Meeting appropriation vote 
on Article 38, to settle the claim and to satisfy any moral obligation 
of the town for group insurance premium contributions said Mary Fuller 
might otherwise have received from the town had she applied for such 
group insurance benefits prior to March of 1994; provided that Mary 
Fuller shall execute a written release to the Town of Wilmington for any 
claims she may have relating to group health insurance benefits prior to 
the receipt of any such payment. 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval. Motion by George Hooper of Finance 
Committee, "I move to aunend Article 9 by deleting Section 2." John Brown, 8 
Brattle Street urged support of this article. George Allan, 7 Stonehedge 
Drive, why are we voting on this again, it was already approved at the April 
Town Meeting. Voted to end debate. Amendment was defeated. Attorney Simon 
Cutter, 43 Church Street stated, the town should correct this wrongdoing and 
vote to make these benefits available. Motion seconded and so voted Yes 133 
No 6. 

ARTICLE 10. (drawn as #15) To see if the Town will vote to accept the 
provisions of G. L. Chapter 32B, Section 9D 1/2 which provides for payment of 
premiums for hospital, surgical, medical, dental and other health insurance 
for the surviving spouse of an insured or retired employee; and to ratify and 
confirm the prior action of the town concerning these matters; or do anything 
in relation thereto. 

Motion by Diane M. Allan, "I move that the Town vote to accept the 
provisions of G.L. Chapter 32B, Section 9D 1/2 which provides for 
payment of premiums for hospital, surgical, medical, dental and other 
health insurance for the surviving spouse of an insured or retired town 
employee; and further to ratify and confirm all prior action of the Town 
of Wilmington concerning such matters." 



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John Brown, 8 Brattle Street urged support of this article. Finance Committee 
recommended approval. Motion seconded and so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 11. (drawn as #3) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-laws and the associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by amending 
Table I, Principal Use Regulations, Section 3, by substituting "SP" (Special 
Permit) for Section 3.5.1 for retail store under the "GI" (General Industrial) 
column; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Richard Longo, Planning Board, "I move that the Town vote to 
amend the Zoning By-laws and the associated zoning map of the Town of 
Wilmington by amending Table I, Principal Use Regulations, Section 3, by 
substituting 'SP' (Special Permit) for Section 3.5.1 for retail store 
under the 'GI' (General Industrial) column." 

This article is to correct table previously presented in 1994. This was left 
out. Finance Committee and Planning Board recommend approval. Motion 
seconded and so voted. Yes 205 No 1. 

Senator Bruce Tarr and Representative James Miceli were introduced at this 
time by Town Moderator, James Stewart. 

ARTICLE 12. (Drawn as #11) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-laws and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to 
rezone from Residential 60 (R-60) to Residential 20 (R-20), said land 
described as land shown on Assessors' Map 27, Parcel 17, further described as 
follows: 

NORTHWESTERLY by Butters Row, one hundred twenty-three and 

36/100 (123.36) feet; 
NORTHEASTERLY by land of Ronald R. and Judith R. Gould, two 

hundred seventy-three (273) feet, and 
NORTHEASTERLY by land of Robert A. Malatesta, eight hundred thirty-eight 

and 76/100 (838.76) feet; 
SOUTHEASTERLY by land of the Town of Wilmington, five hundred 

sixty-four and 14/100 (564.14) feet; 
SOUTHWESTERLY by land of Angelo and Thelma Grassia and land of 

Ralph and Evelyn M. Grassia, three hundred four (304) feet; 
NORTHWESTERLY by land of Henry and Constance Hartwell, two 

hundred ninety-seven (297) feet; 
SOUTHWESTERLY again by land of Hartwell, five hundred one and 

38/100 (501.38) feet; 
NORTHWESTERLY by land of William J. and Helen O'Brien, one 

hundred nine and 04/100 (109.04) feet; and 
NORTHWESTERLY by land of Gerald R. and Anne E. Duggan, one hundred 

fourteen and 56/100 (114.56) feet; and 
SOUTHWESTERLY again by land of Duggan, one hundred eighty-nine 

and 60/100 (189.60) feet. 

Information as shown taken from Massachusetts Quitclaim Deed 9558, Book 3371, 
Page 167 dated December 30, 1985; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Dolores Grasso, "I move that the Town vote to amend the Zoning 
By-law and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by voting to 
rezone from Residential 60 (R-60) to Residential 20 (R-20), said land 
described as land shown on Assessors' Map 27, Parcel 17, further 
described as follows: 

NORTHWESTERLY by Butters Row, one hundred twenty-three and 

36/100 (123.36) feet; 
NORTHEASTERLY by land of Ronald R. and Judith R. Gould, two 

hundred seventy-three (273) feet, and 
NORTHEASTERLY by land of Robert A. Malatesta, eight hundred 

thirty-eight and 76/100 (838.76) feet; 
SOUTHEASTERLY by land of the Town of Wilmington, five hundred 

sixty-four and 14/100 (564.14) feet; 
SOUTHWESTERLY by land of Angelo and Thelma Grassia and land of 

Ralph and Evelyn M. Grassia, three hundred four (304) feet; 



-149- 



NORTHWESTERLY by land of Henry and Constance Hartwell, two hundred 

ninety-seven (297) feet; 
SOUTHWESTERLY again by land of Hartwell, five hundred one and 

38/100 (501.38) feet; 
NORTHWESTERLY by land of William J. and Helen O'Brien, one 

hundred nine and 04/100 (109.04) feet; and 
NORTHWESTERLY by land of Gerald R. and Anne E. Duggan, one hundred 

fourteen and 56/100 (114.56) feet; and 
SOUTHWESTERLY again by land of Duggan, one hundred eighty-nine 

and 60/100 (189.60) feet. 

Information as shown taken from Massachusetts Quitclaim Deed 9558, Book 3371, 
Page 167 dated December 30, 1985; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Mrs. Grasso would like to sell her land and relocate because of health 
reasons. She urged people to support this article as she needs this money to 
live on. Much discussion by neighbors both for and against this article. 
Selectmen Michael McCoy and Robert Cain, spoke in favor. Planning Board 
recommended disapproval. Motion to end debate, so voted, unanimously. Main 
motion seconded and so voted. Needs 2/3rds vote. So voted Yes 139 No 44. 

ARTICLE 13. (drawn as #2) To see if the Town will vote to add Section 3.8.11 
to the Wilmington Zoning By-law, as follows: 

"3.8.11 - Limited Service Restaurant use in the General Industrial 
District shall be allowed by Special Permit subject to the following minimum 
special permit criteria. 

(a) The maximum gross floor area used for Limited Service 
Restaurant use shall not exceed 2,500 square feet on any one lot. 

(b) In any one continuous district zoned General Industrial, the 
total maximum gross floor area used for Limited Service Restaurant 
use shall not exceed 7,500 square feet as a total for all lots in 
such district." 

And to eunend line item 3.5.4 of Table I, Principal Use 
Regulations, to state "SP" in the "GI" column of such table; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by James Mahoney, 3 Gloria Way, I move that the Town of 
Wilmington vote to add Section 3.8.11 to the Wilmington Zoning By-law, 
as follows: 

"3.8.11 - Limited Service Restaurant use in the General Industrial 
District shall be allowed by Special Permit subject to the following minimum 
special permit criteria. 

(a) The maximum gross floor area used for Limited Service 
Restaurant use shall not exceed 2,500 square feet on any one lot. 

(b) In any one continuous district zoned General 
Industrial, the total maximum gross floor area used for 
Limited Service Restaurant use shall not exceed 7,500 square feet 
as a total for all lots in such district. 

And to amend line item 3.5.4 of Table I, Principal Use 
Regulations, to state 'SP' in the 'GI' column of such table." 

Finance and Planning Board recommended approval. Mr. Mahoney explained that 
his business is located in General Industrial District off Route 125. There 
is a need for a restaurant in this area. Many people who work in this 
section of town only have thirty minutes for lunch and would greatly benefit 
from restaurants closer to them. Restaurants could be located in any of the 
GI Districts in the town, explained Richard Longo of the Planning Board. 
Motion seconded and so voted. Yes 205 No 34. 



-150- 



ARTICLE 14. (drawn as #8) To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 3.1, 
Principal Use Regulations as set forth in the Wilmington Zoning By-laws and 
Table I, Principal Use Regulations, Subsection 3.5.4 in order to amend 
"Limited Service Restaurant" to read "SP", in Neighborhood Business Districts, 
requiring special permit criteria as stipulated by the Board of Appeals 
pursuant to paragraph 8.5 of the By-laws; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Attorney Thomas R. Anzuoni, "I move that the Town vote to 
eunend Section 3.1, Principal Use Regulations as set forth in the 
Wilmington Zoning By-laws and Table I, Principal Use Regulations, 
Subsection 3.5.4 in order to amend 'Limited Service Restaurant' to read 
'SP', in Neighborhood Business Districts, requiring special permit 
criteria as stipulated by the Board of Appeals pursuant to paragraph 8.5 
of the By-laws." 

Attorney Anzuoni was representing petitioner Konstantinos Koustenis, owner of 
Uncle Mickey's on Shawsheen Avenue. Since Attorney Anzuoni is not a resident 
of the town, John Forest made the motion for him. Uncle Mickey's would like 
the opportunity to put five tables in their establishment. This is a small 
neighborhood operation and this article would allow them to go before the 
Board of Appeals for a Special Permit. Planning Board recommended 
disapproval. Richard Longo stated this is not a good article, has no 
limitations on it. Arthur Spear stated that the article is too general. 
Motion seconded and so voted. Yes 5 No 198. Motion fails. 

ARTICLE 15. (drawn as #7) To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
By-laws and associated zoning map of the Town of Wilmington by rezoning the 
following parcel of land from Residential 20 (R-20) to Residential 10 (R-10) 
certain parcels of land with the buildings thereon being shown as Parcels llA, 
llBl, lie, IID, 11 and IJ on Assessors' Map 87; or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion by Robert Williams, 231 Woburn Street, "I move that the Town vote 
to cunend the Zoning By-laws and associated zoning map of the Town of 
Wilmington by rezoning the following parcel of land from Residential 20 
(R-20) to Residential 10 (R-10) certain parcels of land with the 
buildings thereon being shown as Parcels llA, llBl, IIC, IID, 11 and IJ 
on Assessors' Map 87." 

Finance Committee and Planning Board recommended disapproval. Mr. Willicuns 
stated that the previous article which rezoned his property at the Annual Town 
Meeting in April was disapproved by the Attorney General because it was 
considered spot zoning. He was advised by an Assistant Attorney General to 
include other parcels in this new article. This article includes other 
neighborhood parcels. The street separates and none are contiguous but 
it is still a neighborhood. Dick Duggan and Jeunes Rooney spoke in support. 
What is passed at Town Meeting should be approved by Attorney General was 
discussed. Richard Longo of Planning Board states that the Board was correct 
in their recommendation of disapproval as they must work with the law, and 
their reply to the Attorney General concerning Mr. William's article at the 
Annual Town Meeting was because it was requested of them by the Attorney 
General of the State. They must reply. Motion seconded and so voted Yes 258 
No 20. Article approved. 

ARTICLE 16. (drawn as #10) To see if the Town will accept the provisions of 
M. G. L. Chapter 41, Section 108L, as amended, providing a career incentive 
program offering base salary increases to regular full-time police officers as 
a reward for furthering their education in the field of police work; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by David Axelrod, 35 Clark Street, "I move that the Town accept 
the provisions of M. G. L. Chapter 41, Section 108L, as amended, 
providing a career incentive program offering base salary increases to 
regular full-time police officers as a reward for furthering their 
education in the field of police work." 



-151- 



Finance Committee recommended disapproval. Stephen Mauriello, stated this 
bill adds additional compensation to police officers salaries, 10% for 
Associate's Degree, 20% for Bachelor's Degree, and 25% for Law Degree or 
Masters Degree. He stated initial cost should be $30,000. James Peterson, 57 
Swain Road, Police Officer and Gerald Tully, 38 West Street, spoke in favor. 
Town Manager, Michael Caira then addressed Town Meeting, stating that the 
Quinn Bill should be brought to collective bargaining and he recommends 
disapproval of this article. The Police Union now has a three year contract, 
which includes a college incentive program. State has not fully funded their 
portion of this bill in the last four years. The Town wisely did not accept 
it previously. Supreme Court ruled that funding by the state is not 
guaranteed. Town Manager stated costs to the Town would be much higher as 
these percentages are added to current salaries. Increases from $35,300 to 
$81,900, $38,800 to $102,400. Motion to move the question and end debate 
voted 198 to 2. Main motion then voted. Yes 197 No 71. 

Total attendance at meeting was three hundred fifty-three (353) and thirty-one 
(31) non-voters. Meeting was adjourned at 10:35 p.m. 




Annual Town Meeting — 7995. 



-152- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



GENERAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 



AND REPORT OF THE TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



June 30, 1995 



Members of the Board of Selectmen 

and Town Manager 
Town Hall 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 01887 



The General Purpose Financial Statements of the Town of Wilmington for the 
fiscal year ended June 30, 1995, are hereby submitted. This report was 
prepared by the Office of the Town Accountant. Responsibility for the 
accuracy of the data and the completeness and fairness of the presentation, 
including all disclosures, rests with the Town. 

To the best of our knowledge and belief, the enclosed data is accurate in all 
material respects and is reported in a manner designed to present fairly the 
financial position and results of operations of the various funds and account 
groups of the government. 



Respectfully submitted. 




-153- 




TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMPREHENSIVE ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT 

Table of Contents 



FINANCIAL SECTION 



PAGE 



Combined Balance Sheet - All Fund Types and Account Groups 155 
Notes to Financial Statements 156 



SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION 



Schedule of Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures 
and Changes in Fund Balances - All Governmental Fund 
Types and Expendable Trust Funds 



159 



Schedule of Combined Balance Sheet - Special Revenue 
Accounts 



161 



Schedule of Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures 
and Changes in Fund Balances - Special Revenue Accounts 



162 



Schedule of Expenditures and Encumbrances Compared with 
Authorization by Function and Activity - General Fund 



164 



Schedule of Revenues and Expenditures - Water Department 
Operations 



173 



Schedule of Revenues and Expenditures - Capital Project Fund 174 



Schedule of Debt Retirement 



175 



Schedule of Trust Funds 



176 



-154- 



TOUN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

COMBINED BALANCE SHEET 
ALL FUND TYPES AND ACCOUNT GROUPS 
JUNE 30, 1995 



ASSETS 



GENERAL 



SPECIAL 
REVENUE 



CAPITAL 
PROJECTS 



TRUST 
AGENCY 



LONG-TERM 

DEBT TOTAL 



CASH 

RECEIVABLES: 

GENERAL PROPERTY TAXES 

LESS:PROV FOR ABATES 
& EXEMPTIONS 

TAX LIENS 

TAX FORECLOSURES 

MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE 

DEPARTMENTAL 

BETTERMENTS 

USER CHARGES 
DUE FROM OTHER GOV'TS 
INV.DEF.COMP.PLAN 
AMOUNTS TO BE PROVIDED FOR: 

RETIRE OF LONG TERM DEBT 

DEFERRED SALARIES 



1,321,334.83 1,457,588.20 369,685,29 1,163,494.28 



1,206,650.06 

(430,471.23) 
491,549.11 

58,102.11 
407,023.13 
122,213.32 
286,302.00 

84,582.44 



361,848.06 
260.604.00 



4,312,102.60 

1,206,650.06 

(430,471.23) 
491,549.11 
58,102.11 
407,023.13 
122,213.32 
286,302.00 
446,430.50 
260,604.00 

336,168.00 336,168.00 
4,638,500.00 4,638,500.00 



TOTAL ASSETS 3,547,285.77 2,080,040.26 369,685.29 1,499,662.28 4,638,500.00 12,135,173.60 

LIABILITIES & FUND BALANCE 



LIABILITIES: 

WARRANTS PAYABLE 

OTHER LIABILITIES 

DEFERRED REVENUE: 
GENERAL PROPERTY TAXES 1,206,650.06 
OTHER ACCTS RECEIVABLE 1,449,772.11 

NOTES PAYABLE 

PAYROLL WITHHOLDINGS 



763, §50. 33 120,433.93 



622,452.06 



4,953.71 
519,418.00 



4,638,500.00 



889,237.97 
519,418.00 

1,206,650.06 
6,710,724.17 



TOTAL LIABILITIES 3,420,272.50 742,885.99 



0.00 524,371.71 4,638,500.00 9,326,030.20 



FUND BALANCE: 
RES. FOR ENCUMBRANCES 
RES. FOR EXPENDITURES 
RES. FOR SPEC. PURPOSE 
RES. FOR DEF. TEACHERS 
UNRESERVED-UNDESIGNATED 

TOTAL FUND BALANCE 



454,087.45 215,000.00 
905,405.22 

(532,636.00) 

205,561.82 216,749.05 
127,013.27 1,337,154.27 



321,141.00 
369,685.29 169,452.28 

484,697.29 

369,685.29 975,290.57 



0.00 



669,087.45 
1,444,542.79 

907,008.16 
2,809,143.40 



TOTAL LIABILITIES 
& FUND BALANCE 



3,547,285.77 2,080,040.26 369,685.29 1,499,662.28 4,638,500.00 12,135,173.60 



-155- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
June 30, 1995 
Summary of Significant Accounting Policies 

The accounting policies for financial reporting purposes of the Tovm of 
Wilmington conform to generally accepted accounting principles for 
local governmental units except as indicated in Note 2. The following 
is a summary of the significant accounting policies: 

A. Fund Accounting 

The Town reports its financial activities in several funds and one 
account group in order to comply with the limitations and 
restrictions placed on both the resources made available to the 
Town and the services provided. The various funds are grouped in 
the financial statements in this report into five generic fund 
types as follows: 

GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS 

General Fund - The general fund is the general operating fund of 
the Town. It is used to account for all financial resources except 
those reqpaired to be accounted for in another fund. 

Special Revenue Funds - Others - Special revenue funds are used to 
account for the proceeds of specific revenue resources (expendable 
trust or major capital projects) that are legally restricted to 
expenditures for specific purposes. 

Capital Projects Fund - Capital project funds are used to account 
for financial resources to be used for the acgulstion or 
construction of major capital facilities (other than those 
financed by trust funds). 

FIDUCIARY FUNDS 

Trust and Agency Funds - Trust and agency funds are used to 
account for assets by the Town in a trustee capacity or as an 
agent for individuals, private organizations, other governments 
and/or other funds. These include expendable trust, non- 
expendable trust and agency funds. Non-expendable trust funds are 
accounted for in a manner that permits the periodic measurements 
of revenues earned, expenses Incurred and/or net income in order 
to demonstrate maintenance of capital. Expendable trust funds are 
accounted for in essentially the scune manner as governmental 
funds. Agency funds are custodial in nature (assets ecjual 
liabilities) and do not involve measurement of results of 
operations. 

ACCOUNT GROUP 

Long-Term Debt and Liabilities - Long-term liabilities expected to 
be financed from governmental funds are accumulated in the general 
long-term debt group of accounts. This account group is not a 
fund. It is only concerned with the measurement of financial 
position and, therefore, is not involved with a measurement of the 
results from any operations. 

B. Basis of Accounting 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared 
principally on the modified accrual basis of accounting. This 
method recognizes revenues when they become measurable and 
available. Expenses are recognized under this method as they are 
Incurred. 



Revenue - Property tax revenues are recognized when they become 
available. Available means then due or past due and receivable 
within the current period or expected to be collected soon enough 
thereafter to be used to pay liabilities of the current period. 

All other revenues are recognized throughout the year when cash is 
received. Receipts during the sixty days immediately following 
the close of the fiscal year are also recognized as available 
revenue. 

In applying the susceptible to accrual concept to inter- 
governmental revenues, the legal and contractual requirements of 
the numerous individual programs are used as guidance. There are, 
however, essentially two types of these revenues. In one, monies 
must be expended on the specific purpose or project before any 
amounts will be paid to the Town. Therefore, revenues are 
recognized based upon the expenditures recorded. In the other, 
monies are virtually unrestricted as to purpose of expenditure and 
are usually revocable only for failure to comply with prescribed 
compliance requirements. These resources are reflected as 
revenues at the time of receipt or earlier if the susceptible to 
accrual criteria is met. 

Expenses - Expenditures are recorded during the year on a cash 
disbursement basis. In addition, as required by Massachusetts 
General Laws, disbursements made during the fifteen days 
immediately following the close of each fiscal year and which 
pertain to the prior year are recorded as warrants payable and 
expenses as of June 30th. 

Purchase orders outstanding at June 30th related to annual 
operating expenses are recorded as encumbrances and, accordingly, 
as a reservation of fund balances at that date. 

Deferred Revenue - Property taxes and other revenues that are 
measurable but not available have been classified as deferred 
revenue on June 30, 1995. 

Encumbrances - Encumbrance accounting under which purchase orders, 
contracts and other commitments for the expenditure of funds are 
recorded in order to reserve that portion of the applicable 
appropriation, is employed in governmental funds. Open 
encumbrances at year-end are reported as reservations of fund 
balances. Encumbrances do not constitute expenditures or 
liabilities. 

Inventory - Inventory items (materials and supplies) are recorded 
as expenditures when purchased (purchase method). 

General fixed assets - General fixed assets are recorded as 
expenditures in applicable governmental funds. The Town does not 
capitalize the cost of general fixed assets in a general fixed 
asset account group which is consistent with the practice of many 
municipalities in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

C. Total Columns 

Total columns on the combined statements are captioned "Memorandum 
Only" to indicate that they are presented only to facilitate 
financial analysis. Data in these columns do not present 
financial position, results of operations or changes in financial 
position in conformity with generally accepted accounting 
principles. Such data is not comparable to a consolidation since 
interfund eliminations have not been made. 

D. Retirement System 

The Town contributes to the Middlesex Contributory Retirement 
System, a single employer plan, established under Chapter 32 of 
the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Substantially all full-time and some part-time employees of the 



-157- 



Town, except teachers and certain administrative personnel 
employed by the School Department, participate in the System. 
Benefits paid under the plan, referred to as "retirement 
allowance", include both an annuity portion, funded principally 
from amounts contributed by the participants, and a pension 
portion funded by the Town. 

The participants contribute a certain percentage of their 
compensation annually, determined by their date of employment. 
The employer contribution by the Town as determined by the 
County's actuarial valuation normal cost plus the amortization of 
the original unfunded actuarial liability. 

Teachers and certain administrative employees of the School 
Department participate in a contributory retirement plan 
administered by the Massachusetts Teachers Retirement Board. 
Contributions to this plan are made entirely by the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, and therefore, the Town does not contribute to 
the plan. 

2 . Departures from Generally Accepted Accounting Principles 

For years prior to 1985, the Town presented its financial statements on 
the basis of accounting practices prescribed by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, Department of Revenue. These practices differed in many 
significant respects from G.A.A.P. 

During 1981, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts issued a revised uniform 
municipal accounting system entitled "U.M.A.S." The departures from 
G.A.A.P. under this revised system have been significantly narrowed. 
The Town has adopted a modified U.M.A.S. for its financial statements. 

The significant departures from G.A.A.P. included in the Town of 
Wilmington's financial statements are: 

a. Retirement benefits are provided for in accordance with Chapter 32 
of the Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (seen note ID). 

b. General fixed asset acquisitions are recorded as expenditures at 
the time purchases are made rather than being capitalized in a 
general fixed asset group of accounts. 

c. Purchases for materials and supplies inventories are recorded as 
expenditures rather than assets at time of purchase. 

3. Long-term Debt 

The annual debt service recjuirement in the future are as follows: 



General Obligation Bonds 

Year ending June 30, Principal Interest Total 



1996 


1,712,500 


330,874 


2,043,374 


1997 


1,385,700 


153,528 


1,539,228 


1998 


670,700 


87,316 


758,016 


1999 


440,700 


53,396 


494,096 


2000 


365,700 


27,983 


393,683 


2001 


225.000 


7.706 


232.706 




4,800,300 


660,803 


5,461,103 



The Town is subject to various debt limits by statute and may issue additional 
debt under the normal debt limit. As of June 30, 1995, the Town has 
authorized and unissued debt of $1,500,000. 



-158- 



TOWN OF UILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES 
IN FUND BALANCES - ALL GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES 
AND EXPENDABLE TRUST FUNDS 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1995 



REVENUES: 



General 



Special 
Revenue 



Capital 
Projects 



Fiduciary 
Fund Types 
Expendable 
Trust 



Total 
(Memorandun 
Only) 



General Property Taxes 


24,150,314.53 








24,150,314.53 


Tax Liens 


722,667.12 


118,204.82 






840,871.94 


Special Assessments 


82,195.97 


3,730.53 






85,926.50 


Excise 


1,588,072.98 








1,588,072.98 


Pena 1 1 i es 


251,122.85 








251,122.85 


Licenses and Permits 


315,960.87 






19,253.40 


335,214.27 


I ntergovernmenta I 


4,593,617.18 


2,269,563.62 




853.68 


6,864,034.48 


Charges for Services 


2,033,677.19 


4,133,354.02 




304,853.85 


6,471,885.06 


Fines 


184,325.50 








184,325.50 


Fees 


54,856.30 








54,856.30 


Interest Earnings 


94,777.46 


6,392.60 




24,701.78 


125,871.84 


Other 


714,201.77 


84,514.38 




806,602.42 


1,605,318.57 


Bonds 


230,000.00 








230,000.00 


Total Revenues 


35,015,789.72 


6,615,759.97 


0.00 


1,156,265.13 


42,787,814.82 


XPENDITURES: 












General Government 


985,664.58 


37,527.33 




666,952.20 


1,690,144.11 


Public Safety 


3,719,543.72 


231,187.82 




252,654.72 


4,203,386.26 


Human Services 


470,861.92 


33,168.43 




7,660.05 


511,690.40 


Public Works 


3,230,978.34 


1,658,259.16 






4,889,237.50 


Conmunity Development 


372,177.28 


226,512.67 






598,689.95 


Building Maintenance 


1,803,769.20 






41,441,39 


1,845,210.59 


Educat i on 


14,928,077.28 


1,412,148.87 




3,104.49 


16,343,330.64 


Recreation 


79,491.49 


291,250.00 






370,741.49 


Veterans' Services 


17,102.36 








17,102.36 


Debt and Interest 


2,612,418.97 








2,612,418.97 


Unclassified 


2,719,776.98 


34,640.96 






2,754,417.94 


Statutory Charges 


2,892,743.00 








2,892,743.00 


Capital Outlay 


566,610.69 


60,424.85 






627,035.54 


Warrant Articles 


6,406.68 








6.406.68 


Refunds 


0.00 








0.00 


Other-Bonds, Court Judgements 


88,000.00 








88,000.00 


Total Expenditures 


34,493,622.49 


3,985,120.09 


0.00 


971,812.85 


39,450,555.43 


xcess (deficiency) of 












Revenues over Expenditures 


522,167.23 


2,630,639.88 


0.00 


184,452.28 


3,337,259.39 



OTHER FINANCIAL SOURCES (USES): 



-159- 




Proceeds of General 
Obligation Bonds 
Operating Transfers In 
Operating Transfers Out 
State and County Charges 
Court Judgements 

Total Other Financing 
Sources (Uses) 



0.00 

1,512,687.85 1,512,687.85 
(1,491,277.85) (6,410.00) (15, 000. 00)(1, 512,687.85) 

0.00 
0.00 



1,512,687.85 (1,491,277,85) (6,410.00) (15,000.00) 



0.00 



Excess/Deficiency of Revenues 
and Other Financing Sources 
over Expenditures and Other 
Uses 



2,034,855.08 1,139,362.03 (6,410.00) 169,452.28 3,337,259.39 



Fund Balance July 1, 1994 



(2,446,050.58) 197,792.24 376,095.29 805,838.29 (1,066,324.76) 



Decrease in Provision for 
Abatements and Exemptions 

Fund Balance June 30, 1995 



538,208.77 538,208.77 
127,013.27 1,337,154.27 369,685.29 975,290.57 2,809,143.40 



-160- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED BALANCE SHEET - SPECIAL REVENUE ACCOUNTS 
ALL FUND TYPES AND ACCOUNT GROUPS 
JUNE 30. 1995 



ASSETS 



CASH 

RECEIVABLES: 

GENERAL PROPERTY TAXES 

LESS:PROV FOR ABATES 
& EXEMPTIONS 

TAX LIENS 

TAX FORECLOSURES 

MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE 

DEPARTMENTAL 

BETTERMENTS 

USER CHARGES 
DUE FROM OTHER GOV'TS 
INV.DEF.COMP.PLAN 
AMOUNTS TO BE PROVIDED FOR: 

RETIRE OF LONG TERM DEBT 

DEFERRED SALARIES 



GRANTS 



GIFTS 



RES. FOR 
APPROP. 



REVOLVING 
FUNDS 



WATER 



TOTAL 



317,751,98 11,764.96 443,045.92 102,037.76 582,987.58 1,457,588.20 



260,604.00 



361,848.06 361,848.06 
260,604.00 



TOTAL ASSETS 578,355.98 11,764.96 443,045.92 102,037.76 944,835.64 2,080,040.26 

LIABILITIES & FUND BALANCE 



LIABILITIES: 

WARRANTS PAYABLE 

OTHER LIABILITIES 

DEFERRED REVENUE: 

GENERAL PROPERTY TAXES 
OTHER ACCTS RECEIVABLE 

NOTES PAYABLE 

PAYROLL WITHHOLDINGS 

TOTAL LIABILITIES 



60,369.93 



260,604.00 



320,973.93 



0.00 



21,761.50 38,302.50 120,433.93 



361,848.06 622,452.06 



0.00 21,761.50 400,150.56 742,885.99 



FUND BALANCE: 
RES. FOR ENCUMBRANCES 
RES. FOR EXPENDITURES 
RES. FOR SPEC. PURPOSE 
RES. FOR DEF. TEACHERS 

UNRESERVED-UNDESIGNATED (426,656.12) 12,738.76 243,983.50 56,997.83 329,685.08 216,749.05 



215,000.00 215,000.00 
684,038.17 (973.80) 199,062.42 23,278.43 905,405.22 



TOTAL FUND BALANCE 

TOTAL LIABILITIES 
& FUND BALANCE 



257,382.05 11,764.96 443,045.92 80,276.26 544,685.08 1,337,154.27 
578,355.98 11,764.96 443,045.92 102,037.76 944,835.64 2,080,040.26 



-161- 



TOUN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES 
IN FUND BALANCES • SPECIAL REVENUE ACCOUNTS 
AND EXPENDABLE TRUST FUNDS 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1995 



Grants 



Gifts 



Reserved for 
Appropriation 



Revolving 
Funds 



Water 



Total 



REVENUES: 
General Property Taxes 
Tax Liens 

Special Assessments 

Excise 

Pena 1 1 i es 

Licenses and Permits 
I ntergovernmenta I 
Charges for Services 
Fines 
Fees 

Interest Earnings 

Other 

Bonds 

Total Revenues 



1,964,783.79 182,500.00 



1,486.73 74.44 4,831.43 
6,358.00 20,861.31 51,937.10 



103,574.59 
1,214,261.81 



1,135.00 



118,204.82 
3.730.53 



18,705.24 
2,919,092.21 



4,222.97 



0.00 
118,204.82 
3,730.53 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 

2,269,563.62 
4,133,354.02 
0.00 
0.00 
6,392.60 
84,514.38 
0.00 



1,972,628.52 20,935.75 239,268.53 1,318,971.40 3,063,955.77 6,615,759,97 



EXPENDITURES: 
General Government 
Public Safety 
Human Services 
Public Works 
Conmunity Development 
Building Maintenance 
Education 
Recreation 
Veterans' Services 
Debt and Interest 
Unclassified 
Statutory Charges 
Capital Outlay 
Warrant Articles 
Refunds 

Other- Bonds, Court Judgements 
Total Expenditures 



37,527.33 
214,680.46 

27,097.39 
328,235.05 
226,512.67 

408,374.75 



19,434.85 



16,507.36 
5,402.19 



668.85 



1,003,774.12 
291,250.00 



15,206.11 



1,330,024.11 



60,424.85 



37,527.33 
231,187.82 
33,168.43 
1,658,259.16 
226,512.67 
0.00 

1,412,148.87 
291,250.00 
0.00 
0.00 

34,640.96 
0.00 

60,424.85 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 



1,261,862.50 21,909.55 



15,206.11 1,295,692.97 1,390,448.96 3,985,120.09 



Excess (deficiency) of 
Revenues over Expenditures 



710,766.02 (973.80) 224,062.42 23,278.43 1,673,506.81 2,630,639.88 



OTHER FINANCIAL SOURCES (USES): 



-162- 



Proceeds of General 
Obligation Bonds 
Operating Transfers In 

Operating Transfers Out (26,727.85) 
State and County Charges 
Court Judgements 

Total Other Financing 
Sources (Uses) (26,727.85) 



(25,000.00) 



0.00 
0.00 
0.00 

(1,439, 550. 00)(1, 491, 277. 85) 
0.00 
0.00 



0.00 (25,000.00) 



0.00 (1,439, 550. 00)(1, 491, 277. 85) 



Excess/Deficiency of Revenues 
and Other Financing Sources 
over Expenditures and Other 
Uses 



684,038.17 (973.80) 199,062.42 23,278.43 233,956.81 1,139,362.03 



Fund Balance July 1, 1994 (426,656.12) 12,738.76 243,983.50 56,997.83 310,728.27 197,792.24 



Decrease in Provision for 
Abatements and Exemptions 



Fund Balance June 30, 1995 257,382.05 11,764.96 443,045.92 80,276.26 544,685.08 1,337,154.27 



-163- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1995 







AMNT CFWD TO 




TRANSFER & 












FY 95 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDED 


CARRY FORWARD 


CLOSEOUT 






FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1995 


FISCAL 1995 


FISCAL 1995 


FISCAL 1995 


FISCAL 1995 


GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 
















Selectmen 


Salaries 


0.00 


1,600.00 


1,600.00 


1,599.96 


0.00 


0.04 


Selectmen 


Expenses 


0.00 


7,350.00 


7,350.00 


7,350.00 


0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


8,950.00 


8,950.00 


8,949.96 


0.00 


0.04 


Elections 


Salaries 


0.00 


14,498.00 


14,498.00 


13,757.36 


0.00 


740.64 


Elections 


Constable 


0.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Elections 


Expenses 


127.62 


3,005.00 


5,255.00 


4,821.49 


150.00 


411.13 






127.62 


17,603.00 


19,853.00 


18,678.85 


150.00 


1,151.77 


Registrars 


Salaries 


0.00 


1,690.00 


1,690.00 


1,690.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Registrars 


Expenses 


45.33 


3,500.00 


3,500.00 


3,473.00 


0.00 


72.33 






45.33 


5,190.00 


5,190.00 


5,163.00 


0.00 


72.33 


Finance Comn. 


Salaries 


0.00 


1,200.00 


1,200.00 


675.80 


0.00 


524.20 


Finance Coiran. 


Expenses 


0.00 


4,725.00 


4,725.00 


4,715.98 


0.00 


9.02 






0.00 


5,925.00 


5,925.00 


5,391.78 


0.00 


533.22 


Town Manager 


Sal -Town Manager 


0.00 


75,000.00 


75,851.07 


75,851.07 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Manager 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


185,920.00 


191,285.26 


191,285.26 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Manager 


Expenses 


2,795.58 


41,600.00 


42,396.65 


45,137.66 


0.00 


54.57 


Town Manager 


Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 


500.00 


500.00 


500.00 


0.00 


0.00 






2,795.58 


303,020.00 


310,032.98 


312,773.99 


0.00 


54.57 


Town Accountant 


Sal -Town Accountant 


0.00 


54,272.00 


55,158.96 


55,158.96 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Accountant 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


59,830.00 


61,824.01 


61,824.01 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Accountant 


Expenses 


0.00 


2,020.00 


2,020.00 


1,852.85 


0.00 


167.15 






0.00 


116,122.00 


119,002.97 


118,835.82 


0.00 


167.15 


Treas/Col lector 


Sal -Finance Dir. 


0.00 


54,272.00 


55,158.96 


55,158.96 


0.00 


0.00 


Treas/Col lector 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


94,596.00 


94,596.00 


88,409.10 


0.00 


6,186.90 


Treas/Col lector 


Expenses 


0.00 


26,850.00 


26,850.00 


26,850.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Treas/Col lector 


Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


175,718.00 


176,604.96 


170,418.06 


0.00 


6,186.90 



-164- 



TOWN OF UILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1995 







AMNT CFUD TO 




TRANSFER & 












FY 95 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDED 


CARRY FORUARD 


CLOSEOUT 






FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1995 


FISCAL 1995 


FISCAL 1995 


FISCAL 1995 


FISCAL 1995 


Town Clerk 


Sal-Town Clerk 


0.00 


41,646.00 


42,326.45 


42,326.45 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Clerk 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


34,469.00 


35,047.52 


35,047.52 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Clerk 


Expenses 


89.81 


2,100.00 


2,100.00 


2,168.88 


0.00 


20.93 


Town Clerk 


Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 






89.81 


78,215.00 


79,473.97 


79,542.85 


0.00 


20.93 


Assessors 


Sal-Prin. Assessor 


0.00 


54,717.00 


55,611.51 


55,611.51 


0.00 


0.00 


Assessors 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


62,125.00 


62,125.00 


52,505.79 


0.00 


9,619.21 


Assessors 


Expenses 


13,256.21 


29,200.00 


29,200.00 


42,107.24 


348.97 


0.00 


Assessors 


Appraisals.EDP 


5,985.73 


50,000.00 


50,000.00 


55,985.73 


0.00 


0.00 


Assessors 


Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 






19,241.94 


196,042.00 


196,936.51 


206,210.27 


348.97 


9,619.21 


Town Counsel 


Contractual Services 


0.00 


57,200.00 


59,700.00 


59,700.00 


0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


57,200.00 


59,700.00 


59,700.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Permanent Bldg Conm Salaries 


0.00 


500.00 


500,00 


0.00 


0.00 


500.00 


Permanent Bldg Conin Expenses 


0.00 


100.00 


100.00 


0.00 


0.00 


100.00 






0.00 


600.00 


600.00 


0.00 


0.00 


600.00 


General Government Subtotal 


22,300.28 


964,585.00 


982,269.39 


985,664.58 


498.97 


18,406.12 


PROTECTION OF 


PERSONS & PROPERTY: 














Pol ice 


Salary-Chief 


0.00 


69,295.00 


70,432.25 


70,432.25 


0.00 


0.00 


Pol ice 


Sal. -Dep. Chief 


0.00 


56,107.00 


57,024.24 


57,024.24 


0.00 


0.00 


Pol ice 


Sa I . - L i eut . 


0.00 


100,057.00 


101,738.12 


101,738.12 


0.00 


0.00 


Pol ice 


Sal.-Sgts. 


0.00 


256,706.00 


256,968.80 


256,968.80 


0.00 


0.00 


Pol ice 


Sal. -Patrolmen 


0.00 


1,040,795.00 


1,054,241.17 


1,054,241.17 


0.00 


0.00 


Pol ice 


Sal .-Clerical 


0.00 


61,481.00 


62,430.89 


62,430.89 


0.00 


0.00 


Pol ice 


Sal. -Fill In Costs 


0.00 


211,573.00 


231,573.00 


231,573.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Pol ice 


Sal. -Pd. Holidays 


0.00 


64,368.00 


65,116.68 


65,116.68 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal. -Specialist 


0.00 


10,200.00 


10,200.00 


9,775.00 


0.00 


425.00 


Police 


Sal . - Incentive 


0.00 


34,000.00 


34,900.00 


34,900.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Police 


Sal. -Night Diff 


0.00 


31,980.00 


31,980.00 


30,327.00 


0.00 


1,653.00 


Pol ice 


Expenses 


0.00 


119,484.00 


122,335.92 


115,230.64 


7,105.28 


0.00 



TOUN OF UILMINGTOM 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1995 







AMNT CFUD TO 




TRANSFER & 












FY 95 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDED 


CARRY FORWARD 


CLOSEOUT 






FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1995 


FISCAL 1995 


FISCAL 1995 


FISCAL 1995 


FISCAL 1995 


Pol ice 


Sick Leave Buyback 


0.00 


12,826.00 


12,826.00 


8,077.53 


0.00 


4,748.47 


Pol ice 


Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 


36,588.00 


36,588.00 


0.00 


36,588.00 


0.00 






0.00 


2,105,460.00 


2,148,355.07 


2,097,835.32 


43,693.28 


6,826.47 


Fire Dept. 


Sal .-Chief 


0.00 


57,262.00 


58,198.15 


58,198.15 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept. 


Sal. -Dep. Chief 


0.00 


50,936.00 


51,772.11 


51,772.11 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept. 


Sal . -Li eut . 


0.00 


212,237.00 


218,314.86 


218,314.86 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept. 


Sal. -Privates 


0.00 


872,583.00 


872,583,00 


863,346.11 


0.00 


9,236.89 


Fire Dept. 


Sal.-Clerk/Disptch 


0.00 


53,708.00 


53,708.00 


46,425.82 


0.00 


7,282.18 


Fire Dept. 


Sal .-Overtime Costs 


0.00 


141,800.00 


149,930.62 


149,930.62 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept. 


Sal . -Pd.Hol idays 


0.00 


64,030.00 


64,030.00 


61,511.23 


0.00 


2,518.77 


Fire Dept. 


Sal.-Incentive/EMT 


0.00 


58,928.00 


58,928.00 


58,720.00 


208.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept. 


Sal.-O.T. Fire Alarm 


0.00 


10,545.00 


10,582.29 


10,582.29 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept. 


Expenses 


138.31 


52,300.00 


52,300.00 


52,300.00 


0.00 


138.31 


Fire Dept. 


Sick Leave Buytiack 


0.00 


13,381.00 


13,381.74 


13,381.74 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept. 


Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 


10,375.00 


10,375.00 


10,375.00 


0.00 


0.00 






138.31 


1,598,085.00 


1,614,103.77 


1,594,857.93 


208.00 


19,176.15 


Emer. Hgmt. 


Expenses 


0.00 


1,650.00 


1,650.00 


1,650.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Enier. Mgnit. 


Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 


1,350.00 


1,350.00 


1,350.00 


0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


3,000.00 


3,000.00 


3,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Animal Control 


Salaries 


0.00 


20.438.00 


20,516.69 


20,516.69 


0.00 


0.00 


Animal Control 


Contractual Services 


0.00 


5,500.00 


5,500.00 


3,318.80 


443.00 


1,738.20 


Animal Control 


Expenses 


0.00 


500.00 


500.00 


14.98 


0.00 


485.02 






0.00 


26,438.00 


26,516.69 


23,850.47 


443.00 


2,223.22 


Prot. Persons 


& Prop. Subtotal 


138.31 


3,732,983.00 


3,791,975.53 


3,719,543.72 


44,344.28 


28,225.84 


PUBLIC WORKS: 
















Engineering Div. 


Salaries 


0.00 


73,717.00 


75,037.89 


75,037.89 


0.00 


0.00 


Engineering Div. 


Salaries-Part Time 


0.00 


35,503.00 


35,503.00 


32,916.28 


0.00 


2,586.72 


Engineering Div. 


Expenses 


0.00 


2,200.00 


2,200.00 


1,478.80 


0.00 


721.20 






0.00 


111,420.00 


112,740.89 


109,432.97 


0.00 


3,307.92 



-166- 



TOWN OF UILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1995 







AMNT CFUD TO 
FY 95 FROM 
FISCAL 1994 


APPROPRIATION 
FISCAL 1995 


TRANSFER & 
APPROPRIATION 
FISCAL 1995 


EXPENDED 
FISCAL 1995 


CARRY FORUARD 
FISCAL 1995 


CLOSEOUT 
FISCAL 1995 


Highway Division 
Highway Division 
Highway Division 
Highway Division 
Highway Division 
Highway Division 
Highway Division 
Highway Division 
Highway Division 


Sal-D.P.U. Super. 
Salaries-Other 
Expenses 
Rd. Mach. Exp. 
Fuel & Other 
Drainage Projects 
Public St. Lights 
Chapter 90M 
Chapter 81M 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
26,980.84 
22,218.94 


70,678.00 
766,714.00 
135,690.00 
60,000.00 
99,394.00 
15,000.00 
199,700.00 
0.00 
60,796.00 


71,833.72 
766,714.00 
143,029.16 

60,000.00 
101,178.35 

15,000.00 
199,700.00 
0.00 

60,796.00 


71,833.72 
732,772.55 
139,966.78 
59,953.37 
95,982.67 
14,628.68 
182,607.41 
0.00 
63,975.05 


0.00 

0.00 
1,605.00 
0.00 
3,383.15 
0.00 
17,092.59 
26,980.84 
19,039.89 


0.00 
33,941.45 
1,457.38 
46.63 
1,812.53 
371.32 
0.00 
0.00 
(0.00) 






49,199.78 


1,407,972.00 


1,418,251.23 


1,361,720.23 


68,101.47 


37,629.31 


Snow & Ice Control 
Snow & Ice Control 


Salaries 
Expenses 


0.00 
0.00 


119,635.00 
173,385.00 


79,635.00 
139,385.00 


42,053.22 
97,890.50 


0.00 
8,765.00 


37,581.78 
32,729.50 






0.00 


293,020.00 


219,020.00 


139,943.72 


8,765.00 


70,311.28 


Highway Division 


Rubbish Collection 


10,909.38 


1,261,732.00 


1,261,732.00 


1,261,312.21 


5,215.40 


6,113.77 






10,909.38 


1,261,732.00 


1,261,732.00 


1,261,312.21 


5,215.40 


6,113.77 


Tree Division 
Tree Division 


Salaries 
Expenses 


0.00 
0.00 


81,100.00 
9,297.00 


81,100.00 
9,297.00 


79,168.61 
6,711.73 


0.00 
0.00 


1,931.39 
2,585.27 






0.00 


90,397.00 


90,397.00 


85,880.34 


0.00 


4,516.66 


Parks/Grounds Div. 
Parks/Grounds Div. 


Salaries 
Expenses 


0.00 
0.00 


133,555.00 
28,353.00 


133,555.00 
28,353.00 


132,409.08 
27,691.58 


0.00 
0.00 


1,145.92 
661.42 






0.00 


161,908.00 


161,908.00 


160,100.66 


0.00 


1,807.34 


Cemetery Division 
Cemetery Division 


Salaries 
Expenses 


0.00 
9,363.81 


102,990.00 
14,725.00 


103,087.45 
14,725.00 


103,087.45 
9,500.76 


0.00 
14,440.60 


0.00 
147.45 






9,363.81 


117,715.00 


117,812.45 


112,588.21 


14,440.60 


147.45 


Public Works Subtotal 


69,472.97 


3,444,164.00 


3,381,861.57 


3,230,978.34 


96,522.47 


123,833.73 


COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT: 

Board of Health Sal-Director 


0.00 


46,868.00 


47,637.02 


47.637.02 


0.00 


0.00 



-167- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1995 

AMNT CFUD TO TRANSFER & 







FY 95 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDED 


CARRY FORWARD 


CLOSEOUT 






FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1995 


FISCAL 1995 


FISCAL 1995 


FISCAL 1995 


FISCAL 1995 


Board of Health 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


78,001.00 


78,001.00 


77,523.71 


0.00 


477.29 


Board of Health 


Expenses 


0.00 


6,100.00 


6.285.57 


5,626.87 


658.70 


(0.00) 


Board of Health 


Mental Health 


0.00 


14,581.00 


14,581.00 


14,580.96 


0.00 


0.04 


Board of Health 


Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


145,550.00 


146,504.59 


145,368.56 


658.70 


477.33 


Sealer/Ught & Meas. 


Salaries 


0.00 


3,780.00 


3.780.00 


3,780.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Sealer/Ught & Meas. 


Expenses 


0.00 


80.00 


80.00 


80.00 


0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


3,860.00 


3,860.00 


3,860.00 


0.00 


0.00 


P I anni ng/Conserv. 


Sal -Director 


0.00 


48,788.00 


48,788,00 


45,605.48 


0.00 


3,182.52 


Planning/Conserv. 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


62,367.00 


62,367.00 


61,460.44 


0.00 


906.56 


P I ann i ng/Conserv . 


Expenses 


850.00 


5,190.00 


5,190.00 


5,224.59 


0.00 


815.41 






850.00 


116,345.00 


116,345.00 


112,290.51 


0.00 


4,904.49 


Bldg. Inspector 


Sal-Bldg Inspector 


0.00 


46,868.00 


57,301.71 


57,301.71 


0.00 


0.00 


Bldg. Inspector 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


50,261.00 


50,578.15 


50,578.15 


0.00 


0.00 


Bldg. Inspector 


Expenses 


0.00 


3,272.00 


3,272.00 


2,778.35 


493.65 


(0.00) 


Bldg. Inspector 


Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


100,401.00 


111,151.86 


110,658.21 


493.65 


(0.00) 


Coomunity Development Subtotal 


850.00 


366,156.00 


377,861.45 


372.177.28 


1,152.35 


5,381.82 


PUBLIC BUILDINGS: 
















Publ ic Bui Idings 


Sa I - Super i nt endent 


0.00 


63,735.00 


64,777.40 


64,777.40 


0.00 


0.00 


Public Bui Idings 


Salaries-Other 


0.00 


1,165,350.00 


1,165,765.57 


1,165,765.57 


0.00 


0.00 


Publ ic Bui Idings 


Fuel Heating 


2,056.89 


214,160.00 


205,133.54 


193,102.90 


14,033.15 


54.38 


Public Bui Idings 


Electric-Town Bldgs. 


0.00 


82,068.00 


92,068.00 


88,574.36 


0.00 


3.493.64 


Publ ic Bui Idings 


Utilities-Town Bldgs 


0.00 


61,196.00 


61,351.14 


57,858.23 


0.00 


3.492.91 


Public Bui Idings 


Expenses -Town Bldgs. 


161.35 


63,579.00 


63,735.50 


62,872.20 


1,024.65 


0.00 


Publ ic Bui Idings 


Expenses-School Bldg 


0.00 


103,002.00 


103,630.98 


103,630.98 


0.00 


0.00 


Public Bui Idings 


Furn. & Equip. 


0.00 


2,000.00 


2,899.00 


2,764.92 


0.00 


134.08 


Publ ic Bui Idings 


Asbestos Repair 


1,730.00 


3,000.00 


3,000.00 


879.36 


3,850.64 


0.00 


Public Bui Idings 


Roof Repairs 


0.00 


13,000.00 


13,000.00 


12,870.55 


0.00 


129.45 


Public Bui Idings 


HVAC Repairs 


0.00 


65,820.00 


65,820.00 


50,672.73 


10,000.00 


5.147.27 



-168- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1995 



AMNT CFUD TO 



TRANSFER & 







FY 95 FROM 
FISCAL 1994 


APPROPRIATION 
FISCAL 1995 


APPROPRIATION 
FISCAL 1995 


EXPENDED 
FISCAL 1995 


CARRY FORWARD 
FISCAL 1995 


CLOSEOUT 
FISCAL 1995 






3,948.24 


1,836,910.00 


1,841,181.13 


1,803,769.20 


28,908.44 


12,451.73 


Publ ic Bui Idings 


Subtotal 


3,948.24 


1,836,910.00 


1,841,181.13 


1,803,769.20 


28,908.44 


12,451.73 


HUMAN SERVICES: 
Veterans 
Veterans 
Veterans 


Salary 

Expenses 

Assistance 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


5,200.00 
1,525.00 
10,000.00 


5,220.00 
1,525.00 
13,000.00 


5,220.00 
1,402.36 
10,480.00 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
122.64 
2,520.00 






0.00 


16,725.00 


19,745.00 


17,102.36 


0.00 


2,642.64 


Library 
Library 
Library 
Library 


Salary-Oi rector 
Salaries-Other 
Expenses 
Furnish & Equip. 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


43,452.00 
253,486.00 
66,086.00 
6,486.00 


43,452.00 
253,486.00 
66,308.29 
6,486.00 


42,849.32 
246,947.64 
65,383.45 
6,486.00 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


602.68 
6,538.36 
924.84 
0.00 






0.00 


369,510.00 


369,732.29 


361,666.41 


0.00 


8,065.88 


Recreation 
Recreation 
Recreation 


Salary-Director 

Salaries-Other 

Expenses 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


50,595.00 
25,381.00 
2,700.00 


51,421.86 
25,381.00 
2,700.00 


51,421.86 
25,377.43 
2.692.20 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
3.57 
7.80 






0.00 


78,676.00 


79,502.86 


79,491.49 


0.00 


11.37 


Elderly Services 
Elderly Services 
Elderly Services 


Salary-Director 

Salaries-Other 

Expenses 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


37,528.00 
39,699.00 
30,018.00 


38,141.26 
39,699.00 
30,018.00 


38.141.26 
39.626.78 
29.426.43 


0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
72.22 
591.57 






0.00 


107,245.00 


107,858.26 


107,194.47 


0.00 


663.79 


Historical Conm. 
Historical Conn. 
Historical Conm 


Salaries 
Expenses 

Furnish. & Equip. 


0.00 
2,121.81 
0.00 


800.00 
1,100.00 
0.00 


800.00 
1,100.00 
0.00 


770.00 
975.23 
0.00 


0.00 
2,196.00 
0.00 


30.00 
50.58 
0.00 






2,121.81 


1,900.00 


1,900.00 


1,745.23 


2,196.00 


80.58 


Handicapped Conin. 
Handicapped Corran. 


Salaries 
Expenses 


0.00 
230.00 


600.00 
300.00 


600.00 
300.00 


98.00 
157.81 


0.00 
372.19 


502.00 
0.00 






230.00 


900.00 


900.00 


255.81 


372.19 


502.00 



-169- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1995 

AMNT CFUD TO TRANSFER & 

FY 95 FROM APPROPRIATION APPROPRIATION EXPENDED CARRY FORWARD CLOSEOUT 
FISCAL 1994 FISCAL 1995 FISCAL 1995 FISCAL 1995 FISCAL 1995 FISCAL 1995 



Human Services Subtotal 



2,351.81 574,956.00 579,638.41 567,455.77 2,568.19 11,966.26 



EDUCATION: 
School Dept. 
School Dept. 
School Dept. 



Appropriation 
Expenses 
Furnish & Equip. 



0.00 11.043,561.00 11,046,261.41 10,909,571.87 135,995.72 693.82 
330,772.98 2,309,787.00 2,309,796.95 2,564,996.41 75,573.52 (0.00 
0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 



330,772.98 13,353,348.00 13,356,058.36 13,474,568.28 211,569.24 693.82 
Regional Vocational Shawsheen Vocational 0.00 1,458,722.00 1,458,722.00 1,453,509.00 0.00 5,213.00 

0.00 1,458,722.00 1,458,722.00 1,453,509.00 0.00 5,213.00 



Education Subtotal 



330,772.98 14,812,070.00 14,814,780.36 14,928,077.28 211,569.24 



5,906.82 



DEBT SERVICE: 



Debt & Interest Schools 


0.00 


978,609.00 


978,609.00 


978,608.75 


0.00 


0.25 


Debt & Interest Gen. Government 


0.00 


89,523.00 


89,523.00 


89,523.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Debt & Interest Sewer 


0.00 


452,611.00 


452,611.00 


452,611.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Debt & Interest Water 


0.00 


1,019,936.00 


1,019,936.00 


1,019,936.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Debt & Interest Auth. Fees & Misc. 


0.00 


86,925.00 


86,925.00 


71,740.22 


0.00 


15,184.78 




0.00 


2,627,604.00 


2,627,604.00 


2,612,418.97 


0.00 


15,185.03 


Debt & Interest Subtotal 


0.00 


2,627,604.00 


2,627,604.00 


2,612,418.97 


0.00 


15,185.03 


UNCLASSIFIED: 














Veterans' Retirement 


0.00 


33,940.00 


33,940.00 


25,386.20 


0.00 


8,553.80 


Employ. Retire. Unused Sick Leave 


0.00 


43,175.00 


45,957,50 


45,957.50 


0.00 


0.00 


Medicare Employers' Contribution 


0.00 


74,517.00 


94,264.80 


94,264.80 


0.00 


0.00 


Unemployment Payments 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Salary Adj. & Add. Costs 


5,600.00 


55,000.00 


7,085.92 


8,294.67 


77.00 


4.314.25 


Local Trans/Training Conf. 


0.00 


6,300.00 


6,300.00 


2,129.05 


200.00 


3,970.95 


Out of State Travel 


0.00 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


1,000.00 


Computer Hardware & Software 














Ma int. & Expenses 


2,936.50 


46,263.00 


52,263.00 


46,721.46 


8,478.04 


(0.00 


Microfilm Projects 


0.00 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


0.00 


1,000.00 


0.00 



-170- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1995 





AHNT CFWD TO 




TRANSFER & 










FY 95 FROM 


APPROPRIATION 


APPROPRIATION 


EXPENDED 


CARRY FORWARD 


CLOSEOUT 




FISCAL 1994 


FISCAL 1995 


FISCAL 1995 


FISCAL 1995 


FISCAL 1995 


FISCAL 1995 


Annual Audit 


0.00 


13,900.00 


13,900.00 


13,900.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Ambulance Billing 


0.00 


10,000.00 


10,000.00 


10,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Town Report 


0.00 


6,000.00 


6,000.00 


5,628.70 


0.00 


371 .30 


Hazardous Hat. Consult. Services 


0.00 


2,500.00 


2,500.00 


0.00 


0.00 


2,500.00 


Sewer Maintenance 


0.00 


30,000.00 


43,500.00 


43,500.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Reserve Fund 


0.00 


71,697.00 


51,697.00 


0.00 


0.00 


51,697.00 


Insurance & Bonds 


1,400.00 


598,268.00 


598,268.00 


509,703.08 


25,000.00 


64,964.92 


Enployee Health & Life Insurance 


49,968.12 


2,097,717.00 


2,211,967.46 


1,914,291.52 


0.00 


347,644.06 


Unclassified Subtotal 


59,904.62 


3,091,277.00 


3,179,643.68 


2,719,776.98 


34,755.04 


485,016.28 


STATUTORY CHARGES: 














Ant, Cert. Coll. Tax Title 


10,559.70 


26,000.00 


36,000.00 


37,928.50 


8,631.20 


(0.00) 


Current Year Overlay 


0.00 


600,000.00 


649,999.26 


0.00 


0.00 


649,999.26 


Prior Year Overlay Deficit 


0.00 


100,000.00 


468,863.00 


0.00 


0.00 


468,863.00 


Retirement Contributions 


0.00 


1,331,088.00 


1,076,390.24 


1,076,390.24 


0.00 


0.00 


Teachers Retirement 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


County Retirement Tax 


21,548.72 


44,174.00 


44,174.00 


65,722.26 


0.00 


0.46 


Offset Items 


0.00 


32,213.00 


35,916.00 


0.00 


0.00 


35,916.00 


Special Education 


0.00 


2,038.00 


6,652.00 


974.00 


0.00 


5,678.00 


Mass Bay Trans Auth. 


0.00 


403,420.00 


400,640.00 


400,563.00 


0.00 


77.00 


MAPC <Ch.688 of 1963) 


0.00 


3,846.00 


4,071.00 


4,071.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Excise Tax (Ch. 727 of 1962) 


0.00 


0.00 


4,980.00 


11,140.00 


0.00 


(6,160.00) 


Energy Cons. Pro. Assessment 


0.00 


19,916.00 


19,916.00 


19,916.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Metro Air Poll. Cont. Dist. 


0.00 


4,463.00 


4,646.00 


4,646.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Mosquito Control Program 


0.00 


23,000.00 


23,642.00 


22,913.00 


0.00 


729.00 


H.W.R.A. Sewer Assessment 


0.00 


1,212,054.00 


1,248,479.00 


1,248,479.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Final Court Judgements 


0.00 


0.00 


85,000.00 


88,000.00 


0.00 


(3,000.00) 


Statutory Charges Subtotal 


32,108.42 


3,802,212.00 


4,109,368.50 


2,980,743.00 


8,631.20 


1,152,102.72 


CAPITAL OUTLAY: 














Police Dept. Cruisers 


0.00 


76,055.00 


76,055.00 


74,105.00 


0.00 


1,950.00 


Fire Dept. Pumper 


230,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


230,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Fire Dept. Ambulance 


0.00 


90,000.00 


90,000.00 


90; 000. 00 


0.00 


0.00 


Highway Div. Sidewalks 


0.00 


61,280.00 


66,317.69 


66,317.69 


0.00 


0.00 


Highway Div. Pickup Trucks 


50,703.00 


0.00 


0.00 


50,703.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Public Buildings Telephone System 


25,137.27 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


25,137.27 


0.00 


Public Buildings School Chairlift 


0.00 


55,485.00 


55,485.00 


55,485.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Capital Outlay Subtotal 


305,840.27 


282,820.00 


287,857.69 


566,610.69 


25,137.27 


1,950.00 



-171- 



TOUM OF WILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF GENERAL FUND 
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1995 

AMNT CFUD TO TRANSFER ft 

FY 95 FROM APPROPRIATION APPROPRIATION EXPENDED CARRY FORWARD CLOSEOUT 
FISCAL 1994 FISCAL 1995 FISCAL 1995 FISCAL 1995 FISCAL 1995 FISCAL 1995 



WARRANT ARTICLES: 

Memorial Day/Veterans Day 0.00 5,000.00 5,000.00 4,156.68 0.00 843.32 

Lease Quarters-Marines, VFW, Legion 0.00 2,250.00 2,250.00 2,250.00 0.00 0.00 

Street Acceptance 0.00 100.00 100.00 0.00 0.00 100.00 



Warrant Articles Subtotal 0.00 7,350.00 7,350.00 6,406.68 0.00 943.32 



TOTAL 827,687.90 35,543,087.00 35,981,391.71 34,493,622.49 454,087.45 1,861,369.67 



< 



-172- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
WATER DEPARTMENT 
ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 



ACTUAL FISCAL ACTUAL FISCAL ACTUAL FISCAL 



REVENUES: 

WATER RECEIVABLES RATES 
WATER RECEIVABLES SERVICES 
WATER RECEIVABLES INDUSTRIAL 
WATER RECEIVABLES CONNECTIONS 
WATER RECEIVABLES FIRE PROT. 
WATER RECEIVABLES CROSS CONN. 
WATER LIENS 
SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS 
CAPITAL PROJECT CLOSEOUTS 
MISCELLANEOUS 
REIMBURSEMENTS 

TOTAL REVENUE: 

OPERATING COSTS 

CLOSEOUT TO MAI NT. & OPERATIONS 
TOTAL OPERATING COSTS: 



TRANSFERS TO GENERAL FUND FOR 
DEBT SERVICE, EMPLOYEES BENEFITS 
AND ALLOCATED CHARGES 

EXCESS OF EXPENDITURES AND 
TRANSFERS OVER REVENUES 

TOTAL FUND BALANCE - BEGINNING 

TOTAL FUND BALANCE - ENDING 



1993 


1994 


1995 


2,404,215.47 


2,691,225.68 


2,680,383.24 


11,974.79 


16,414.11 


8,981.94 


15,227.93 


49,644.51 


31,339.80 


66,100.00 


85,350.00 


113,508.00 


29,865.29 


31,112.29 


30,913.29 


3,840.00 


44,760.00 


41,614.60 


95,793.02 


103,708.26 


118,204.82 


3,448.48 


4,338.85 


3,730.53 


47,465.00 


0.00 


0.00 


18,767.61 


31,953.87 


16,574.31 


41,710.00 


63,062.53 


18,705.24 


2,738,407.59 


3,121,570.10 


3,063,955.77 


1,712,195.10 


1,401,187.00 


1,390,448.96 


47,465.00 


0.00 


0.00 


1,759,660.10 


1,401,187.00 


1,390,448.96 


978,747.49 


1,720,383.10 


1,673,506.81 


1,298,693.00 


1,473,987.00 


1,439,550.00 


(319,945.51) 


246,396.10 


233,956.81 


384,277.68 


64,332.17 


310,728.27 


64,332.17 


310,728.27 


544,685.08 



-173- 



TOUM OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
COHBINING STATEMENTS OF REVENUES, 
EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 





CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 


1995 






Town Meeting Dates 


SEWER 
CONSTRUCTION 


(ENGINEERING) 
N.E. SEWER 
INTERCEPTOR 
4/23/88 


MAIN ST. 

SEWER 
4/22/89 


HIGH SCHOOL 
RENOVATION 


TOTAL 
(MEMORANDUM 
ONLY) 


Initial Project Authorization 1,210,000.00 


450,000.00 


747,000.00 7,750,000.00 10,157,000.00 


REVENUES: 

Intergovernmental 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Total Revenue 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


EXPENDITURES: 

Capital Outlay 
Total Expenditures 
Excess of revenues over/under 

expenditures 


0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 


Other Financial Sources (uses) 
Proceeds of General 

Obligation Bonds & Notes 
Operating transfers 
Total Other Financial 
Sources/Uses 


0.00 
(6,410.00) 


0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
(6,410.00) 


Excess of Revenues 
and other sources over 
(under) expenditures and 
other uses 


(6,410.00) 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


(6,410.00) 


FUND BALANCE JULY 1, 1994 


234,346.26 


7,266.68 


121,479.43 


13,002.92 


376,095.29 


FUND BALANCE JUNE 30, 1995 


227,936.26 


7,266.68 


121,479.43 


13,002.92 


369,685.29 



-174- 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
SCHEDULE OF LONG TERM DEBT-PRINCIPAL 
FOR FISCAL YEAR 1995 





YEAR 


YEAR 




OUTSTANDING AT 


BOND 


BOND 


OUTSTANDING A 


DESCRIPTION 


ISSUE 


DUE 


RATE 


JUNE 30, 1994 


ADDITIONS 


RETIREMENTS 


JUNE 30. 199 


INSIDE DEBT LIMIT 
















Sewer Bonds 


07-77 


Uf TO 








An nnn 




Sewer Bonds 


05-82 




s-in L 

y mJ 1 U ■ H 






9nn nnn 

£UV , UUU 


CTU I VVV 


Street Bonds 


11-90 


1 1 - OR 
1 1 yo 


O • O D • OJ 


A^ nnn 




m nnn 

1 J , UUv 


jyj t UUU 


Remodel ing 


11-90 


11-98 


6.85 


255,000 


- 


55,000 • 


200,000 


Sewer - Main Street 


11-90 


11-98 


6.8-6.85 


520,000 




75,000 


445,000 


School Boilers 


11-90 


11-99 


6.8-6.85 


565,000 




95,000 


470,000 


Sewer -MWRA Loan 


06-95 


05-00 


5.1 





103,500 





103,500 


D ept . Equ i pment -Fire 


06-95 










u 


?7n nnn 

£ JU , UUU 


TOTAL INSIDE DEBT LIMIT 






2,215,000 


333,500 


520,000 


2,028,500 


OUTSIDE DEBT LIMIT 
















High School Bonds 


01-85 


01-95 


8 


650,000 




650,000 





School Renovation 


08-86 


08-96 


5.8-5.9 


340,000 




130,000 


210,000 


Water Plant 


07-79 


07-98 


5.25 


600,000 




150,000 


450,000 


Water Plant 


08-86 


08-96 


5.8-5.9 


1,110,000 




370,000 


740,000 


Water Land Purchase 


08-92 


08-96 


4.25 


525,000 




175,000 


350,000 


Water Standpipe 


11-90 


11-00 


6.8-8.85 


1,020,000 




160,000 


860,000 


TOTAL OUTSIDE DEBT 


LIMIT 






4,245,000 





1,635,000 


2,610,000 


TOTAL DEBT 








6,460,000 


333,500 


2,155,000 


4,638,500 



-175- 



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Boards Committees & Commissions 



Meeting Dates & Times 



Board, Committee, Commission 




Date 


RoomBuilding 


Time 


APPEALS, BOARD OF 


1st 


& 3rd Monday 


4 


Town Hall 


7:00 


p.m. 


ARTS, COUNCIL FOR THE 


2nd 


Wednesday 




Arts Center 


7:00 


p.m. 


ASSESSORS, BOARD OF 


2nd 


& 4th Thursday 


2 


Town Hall 


9:30 


a.m. 


CARTER LECTURE FUND 


As Needed 










CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 


3rd 


Thursday 




Cemetery 


1:00 


p.m. 


CONSERVATION COMMISSION 


1st 


St 3rd Wednesday 


9 


Town Hall 


7:00 


p.m. 


DISABILITIES, WILMINGTON COMM. 






4 


Town Hall 


6:00 


p.m. 


ELDERLY SERVICES COMMISSION 


3rd 


Tuesday 




Sr. Center 


2:30 


p.m. 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 


2nd 


Tuesday 


9 


Town Hall 


7:30 


p.m. 


HEALTH, BOARD OF 


1st 


& 3rd Monday 


4 


Town Hall 


5: 15 


p.m. 


HISTORICAL COMMISSION 


2nd 


Monday 


4 


Town Hall 


7:30 


p.m. 


HOUSING AUTHORITY 


1st 


Tuesday 




Deming Way 


7:30 


p.m. 


HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 


2nd 


Thursday 


9 


Town Hall 


7:30 


p.m. 


LIBRARY TRUSTEES 


3rd 


Tuesday 




Library 


7:30 


p.m. 


PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 


Monthly 




Town Hall 


7:00 


p . m . 


PLANNING BOARD 


1st 


& 3rd Tuesday 


9 


Town Hall 


7:30 


p.m. 


RECREATION COMMISSION 


1st 


Thursday 


8 


Town Hall 


7:00 


p.m. 


RECYCLING ADVISORY COMM. 


Monthly 




Town Hall 


6:30 


p.m. 


REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 


3rd 


Thursday 




Chamber Office 


7:00 


p.m. 


REG. VOC./TECH. SCHOOL COMM. 


2nd 


& 4th Tuesday 




Shaw. Tech. 


7:30 


p.m. 


REGISTRARS, BOARD OF 


2nd 


Monday 


12 


Town Hall 


7:00 


p.m. 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE 


2nd 


& 4th Wednesday 


9 


Town Hall 


7:00 


p.m. 


SELECTMEN, BOARD OF 


2nd 


& 4th Monday 


9 


Town Hall 


7:00 


p.m. 


TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 


As Needed 










WATER & SEWER COMMISSION 






AUD 


Town Hall 


6:00 


p.m. 



-177- 



* * For Your Information * * 



Department Phone Directory 



Department 

Accountant 
Animal Control 

Arts Center 
Assessor 

Board of Selectmen Office 
Building Inspector 
Cemetery Department 
Collector of Taxes 
Credit Union 

Department of Public Works 
Elderly Services 
Engineer 

Financial Director 
Fire Department 

Health, Board of 
Housing Authority 
Library 

Nurse 

Planning/Conservation 
Plumbing Inspector 
Police Department 



Public Buildings Department 
Recreation Department 
School Department 
Town Clerk 
Town Manager 

Treasurer 
Tree Department 
Veteran's Agent 
Water Department 
Water Pumping Station 



Telephone Number 

694-2029 

658-5071 (Complaints) 
658-7845 (Missing/Adoption) 

657- 3887 

658- 3675 
658-3311 
658-4531 
658-3901 
658-3531 
658-5394 
658-4481 

657- 7595 

658- 4499 
658-3531 

658-3346 (Business Phone) 

9-1-1 (EMERGENCY) 
658-4298 
658-8531 
658-2967 

657- 4625 (TDD) 

658- 4298 
658-8238 
658-3223 
658-5071 

9-1-1 (EMERGENCY) 

657- 8368 (TDD) 

658- 3017 
658-4270 
694-6000 
658-2030 
658-3311 
694-1417 (TDD) 
658-3531 
658-2809 
694-2040 
658-3116 
658-4711 



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